Music education – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 12:05:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png Music education – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Walnut Creek Northgate High student fills gap in music education programs https://russjohnsonmusic.com/walnut-creek-northgate-high-student-fills-gap-in-music-education-programs/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 12:05:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/walnut-creek-northgate-high-student-fills-gap-in-music-education-programs/ WALNUT CREEK — Sophomores at Northgate High School have been tasked with a community service project that revolves around something that inspires them to change the world. A 15-year-old, Aidan Fisher, has made it his mission to put instruments in the hands of students who otherwise might not have the chance to feel the impact […]]]>

WALNUT CREEK — Sophomores at Northgate High School have been tasked with a community service project that revolves around something that inspires them to change the world.

A 15-year-old, Aidan Fisher, has made it his mission to put instruments in the hands of students who otherwise might not have the chance to feel the impact of music in their lives.

“I’ve been playing for five years now,” says Fisher as he prepares his saxophone for his orchestra lesson.

This spring, the Mount Diablo Unified School District voted for cuts for the next school year to include the elimination of music programs for Grade 4, the elimination of the Diablo Day program – an alternative school for children at high risk and the removal of librarians from college and high school libraries.

At the time of the board’s vote, the district said it was operating with a deficit of about $20 million per school year, in part due to declining enrollment.

Fisher knew he had to do something so other kids could play.

“Grade 4 music was cut, so I’m just trying to donate it so more people can get more into music, just like me,” Fisher told KPIX.

Fisher’s mother, Monaliza Fisher, helps her son with his instrument player.

“We’ve had a number of people drop off their instruments here,” she said. “We have this storage space just to hold the instruments that Aidan collects.”

After being posted on local social media sites, Aidan’s project received a good response from his community. Many people have donated instruments to his cause. A woman, who lives just down the street, donated her guitar and a new Yamaha keyboard.

“I was a singer, it was my instrument,” said Phyllis Amon.

At 81, Amon can no longer use his favorite instruments. The guitar she played to accompany her voice was becoming too difficult for her hands to play now that she has arthritis.

This photo was taken in the 70s,” Amon explains, looking at an old photo of herself with a guitar. “Look at her, she’s happy, look at that joy she has.”

Amon is well aware of the gift that the sound of music can give to those who create it.

“When you sing, when you get into the music, you’re practically there,” Amon said. “It’s incredible.”

The Concord resident now talks about the pressure on students who don’t have the right avenues to express themselves due to a lack of resources in schools.

“I don’t think they understand how important it is to have the arts,” Amon said.

Amon worries that this year’s cuts to 4th grade music classes are just the start of more to come.

“If you feel like a stranger, maybe that’s a way of feeling like you belong,” Amon said.

Aidan Fisher follows in Amon’s footsteps. Her daily routine for her 6th period class is Jazz Band 2, practicing for an hour at school every day.

He has found joy in music and has the opportunity to explore his talent through his music program.

“Music is one of my favorite things in the world, I love playing jazz, I love listening to jazz,” Fisher said. “Especially the 6th period, it’s like my last thing and I play that and it makes me really happy.”

He wants other students to have the chance to get an instrument as well.

“I really want this to be a big factor in many other lives as well,” Fisher said. “Knowing that I can give it to people who really want to use it or can’t afford it or can’t get one.”

It was through music that Fisher and his band of classmates found a place of acceptance and unity in their love of the notes they play.

“All of my friends that I have now come from music and I certainly wouldn’t have them today without music,” Fisher said.

To donate used musical instruments to Aidan’s community service project, you can contact Monaliza Fisher at monaliza@astound.net.

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Survey of acclaimed composers shows importance of music education throughout their career https://russjohnsonmusic.com/survey-of-acclaimed-composers-shows-importance-of-music-education-throughout-their-career/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 09:45:58 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/survey-of-acclaimed-composers-shows-importance-of-music-education-throughout-their-career/ new November 14, 2022 A survey conducted by the Ivors Academy to mark 20 years of the Ivors Composer Awards has shown the importance of music education at every stage in the careers of acclaimed classical music, jazz and sound art composers. The majority have studied music in school, had the opportunity to learn an […]]]>

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A survey conducted by the Ivors Academy to mark 20 years of the Ivors Composer Awards has shown the importance of music education at every stage in the careers of acclaimed classical music, jazz and sound art composers. The majority have studied music in school, had the opportunity to learn an instrument, the chance to play music growing up and many now teach as part of their career.

The investigation reveals that 319 composers who have won or been nominated for an Ivor Novello Award, 96% learned one or more instruments as a child and 94% had the opportunity to play music when he is young. Among those who performed, more than 50 composers had opportunities at school or in their region.

64% of respondents attended a publicly funded school and 21% had a scholarship to go to an independent school. Demonstrating the importance of music education in all schools, 83% studied music to A level. There has been a long-term decline in the number of A Level Music entrants to England, Wales and Northern Ireland, in 2012 there were 7,655 compared to 5,916 in 2022.

Charlotte Harding, Ivor Novello Award-winning composer, said: “As we celebrate 20 years of achievement by composers in the UK, this survey reminds us that composers benefit enormously from sustained support throughout their careers. Alongside a healthy cultural sector, opportunities to learn, play and experience the love of music at school and in local areas can lead to a lifetime of creative expression and should be encouraged, enhanced and protected. .

Composers rely heavily on commissions and more 60% had received at least one commission from the BBC or one of its ensembles. 44% of respondents said the frequency of commissions had decreased since the beginning of their career and 46% that per-minute commission charges had decreased or stayed the same.

Arts Council of England, PRS Foundation and the Vaughan Williams Foundation where the 3 main sources of funding.

Graham Davies, Chief Executive of Ivors Academy, said: “Composers are expressing concern about the impact of funding changes and the long-term decline of music education in public schools. We must bring music back to every school and community, and secure stable, long-term funding for the UK’s enviable cultural institutions and venues.

Composers report having “portfolio careers”, dividing their time between composing, teaching, performing, organizing workshops and administration. Some say they can spend more time composing as their career develops, but the need for more support and opportunities for mid-career and early-career composers is clear.

Even though a third of respondents said it had become more difficult to start a career as a composer, 75% said they would become a composer again if they started today. The investigation starts a conversation from the Ivors Academy, Composers under pressure?to examine the opportunities and challenges faced by composers in the UK throughout their careers.

The anonymous survey was sent to past winners and nominees of The Ivors Composer Awards, formerly known as the British Composer Awards. Over the past twenty years the awards have celebrated and recognized the craftsmanship and achievements of some of the UK’s most talented composers including Sir Harrison Birtwistle, Tansy Davies, Mark-Anthony Turnage, Sir John Tavener, Yazz Ahmed, Jonny Greenwood, Sally Beamish, Anna Meredith. , Errollyn Wallen, Roderick Williams, Jason Yarde and many more.

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Online Music Education Market Size, Global Demand Analysis and https://russjohnsonmusic.com/online-music-education-market-size-global-demand-analysis-and/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 03:59:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/online-music-education-market-size-global-demand-analysis-and/ Analytica’s recent research report includes an in-depth analysis of the major players in the global online music education market, including their corporate identities and business strategies. This allows the buyer of the report to get a complete picture of the competitive landscape and develop market strategies accordingly. Astute Analytica’s report illustrates a detailed picture of […]]]>

Analytica’s recent research report includes an in-depth analysis of the major players in the global online music education market, including their corporate identities and business strategies. This allows the buyer of the report to get a complete picture of the competitive landscape and develop market strategies accordingly.

Astute Analytica’s report illustrates a detailed picture of the global online music education market for the study period 2017-2027. The market is estimated to register a revenue of US$421.9 million by the end of the year 2027, from US$130.7 million in 2020. The market is growing at a CAGR of 18.4% over the forecast period. Request to download an example of this strategic report: – https://www.astuteanalytica.com/request-sample/online-music-education-market

The research in-depth analyzes the prices, gross revenue (Mn), entry-level storage specifications and company profiles in a separate section with major key players.

Main competitors

Berklee College of Music, The Juilliard School, Lessonface, Moosiko, MusicGurus and other top players.

The Online Music Education Market Size section provides the market revenue, considering both historical market growth and future projections. The report also includes a variety of company profiles that are either creating waves in their respective industries or have the potential to do so. Their profiles include players market size, important product launches, strategies and other information.

The report details the overall market sales produced over time by a specific company. By taking into account the product sales over a period and dividing them by the total industry sales over the same period, the experts in the field decide to share.

The research examines the current size of the global market and its five-year growth rates. It also includes many types of segmentation, including geographic segmentation (North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, etc.). Detailed information on market segments facilitates performance tracking and crucial decision making for expansion and profitability.

Segmentation analysis

Online Music Education Market SegmentationThe online music education market is segmented on the basis of type, instrument type, session type, organizer type, learner type, and region. Among the four main instruments, namely piano, guitar, banjo and violin, piano holds the highest market share of 38% of online music education. This is mainly due to the growing demand from students and the introduction of new piano lessons by various universities and schools. The market value of piano is around US$44.7 million in 2020, followed by guitar in second place. Download full sample report- https://www.astuteanalytica.com/request-sample/online-music-education-market By device type
Piano
Guitar
Banjo
Violin
Other
By type
music history
Musicology
The theory
Others
By session type
Solo
Band
By type of organizer
Schools
Music studios/academy
Professionals
By type of learner
Beginners
Amateurs
Professional musicians
By region
North America
United States
Canada
Mexico
Europe
Great Britain
Germany
France
Spain
Russia
Russia
Asia Pacific
China
India
Japan
Australia and New Zealand
ASEAN
Rest of Asia-Pacific
Middle East and Africa (MEA)
United Arab Emirates
Saudi Arabia
South Africa
Rest of MEA
South America
Brazil
Argentina
Rest of South America
Request a full report- https://www.astuteanalytica.com/request-sample/online-music-education-market

About Astute Analytica:

Astute Analytica is a global analytics and consulting company that has built a solid reputation in a short time, thanks to the tangible results we have delivered to our clients. We pride ourselves on generating unrivaled, thorough and incredibly accurate estimates and projections for our highly demanding clients spread across different verticals. We have a long list of satisfied and repeat customers from a wide range including Technology, Healthcare, Chemicals, Semiconductors, FMCG and many more. These satisfied customers come to us from all over the world.

They are able to make well-calibrated decisions and take advantage of highly lucrative opportunities while overcoming fierce challenges, all because we analyze for them the complex business environment, existing and emerging opportunities by segment, technology formations , growth estimates and even the strategic choices available. . In short, a complete package. All of this is possible because we have a team of highly qualified, knowledgeable and experienced professionals including business analysts, economists, consultants and technology experts. In our list of priorities, you, our patron, come first. If you decide to engage with us, you can be sure of the best value-added and cost-effective package from us.

Contact us:

Phone number: +18884296757

Email: sales@astuteanalytica.com

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This press release was published on openPR.

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Educators fight for accessible music education despite funding and diversity challenges | New https://russjohnsonmusic.com/educators-fight-for-accessible-music-education-despite-funding-and-diversity-challenges-new/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/educators-fight-for-accessible-music-education-despite-funding-and-diversity-challenges-new/ Teachers have found ways to make music education more accessible and relevant for elementary, high school, and college students, despite the lack of funding and the diversity of music education programs. From 2014 to 2018, Oklahoma’s 1,110 fine arts classes endured a period of severe state budget cuts. In 2018, nearly 30% of Oklahoma public […]]]>

Teachers have found ways to make music education more accessible and relevant for elementary, high school, and college students, despite the lack of funding and the diversity of music education programs.

From 2014 to 2018, Oklahoma’s 1,110 fine arts classes endured a period of severe state budget cuts. In 2018, nearly 30% of Oklahoma public school students did not have access to fine arts classes.

Funding for music education programs in particular has long been an issue in the United States, and while it is too early to have any information on the impact of the recent COVID-19 pandemic on fine art programs arts, it is clear that many districts have experienced budget cuts resulting in cut programs and laid off arts educators.

“Unfortunately, the arts most often get the bottom of the funding poll because we haven’t sufficiently identified the fact that the arts are essential to humanity,” said Michael Raiber, former UO professor and current Director of Fine Arts at Mustang Public Schools. “If it’s essential to humanity, then it’s essential to human education.”

Christopher Baumgartner, associate professor of instrumental music education at OU, said funding for music education programs is different for every school across the country. Often, he said, the burden of providing instruments falls on the student themselves, making it “a constant battle” to ensure students have equitable access to music education.

“I think it’s catch-22,” Baumgartner said. “We want our school districts to have enough state and federal funding to support everything for our students, so they can just walk in and we can just teach them and be done. But, that’s not the reality really anywhere.

Jessica Haley, a former public school music teacher and currently a first-year master’s student in music education at OU, said one of the biggest hurdles she faces as a teacher is funding. At Clear Fork Valley Public School in Ohio, where she worked, Haley said many children lived in rural areas where they didn’t have internet access and often struggled to get enough reeds. for a clarinet.

Even so, Haley said the use of technology in bands expands students’ access to music. When schools received a grant to provide students with Chromebooks for their lessons, Haley said it helped break the funding barrier within the music curriculum.

“The language of students these days is technology,” Haley said. “If we can better achieve them by incorporating technology, then that’s a very valid pursuit.”

Baumgartner said while there is no single answer, he sees how teachers are getting creative with fundraising and parents are helping with donations to solve the underfunding problem. Additionally, he believes that teachers, both at OU and in all school systems, need to communicate the successes of their students.

“Advocacy is something that’s never going to go away,” Baumgartner said. “We always advocate for our programs to allow our students to involve more children because we know how much we love music and what it does for us and we want to do it for all of our children.”

Along with using technology to provide better access for students, Haley said community support in her former school district was key to the program. Advocacy to find more ways to bring music into the community, she said, is an important way to keep music alive in schools.

“One thing that I really loved about teaching in Clear Fork was that there was a really strong sense of community because it was like a small, rural town,” Haley said. “Everyone knows everyone, and I think the band’s program really played to that strength.”

The technology has broken down some of the barriers caused by a lack of funding in student music programs across the country, and it’s also contributing to increased accessibility to diverse groups in music education programs, according to Raiber and Baumgartner.

In a 2019 longitudinal study of more than 30,000 students, it was found that black students, men, people with disabilities, people living in poverty and people not yet fluent in English had no not the same opportunities for exposure to the arts in public colleges compared to others. groups. This points to inequities and access gaps in K-12 classrooms within the arts and culture industry.

Diversity in music education has also been an issue for years in the music teacher workforce, Raiber said. This problem is most often observed in urban and rural areas, Raiber said, and results from the fact that these spaces do not provide opportunities for students and teachers.

Raiber said the arts, as a profession, have for too long been seen as an “activity rather than an essential.” For this reason, music education programs have not made music widely accessible in educational settings, he said.

One problem, Rabier said, especially with the lack of diverse groups in music education, is that to be in this field, students must enter with a skill set already in place. Unlike other professions, music majors must audition and be accepted into a studio to register, which means they must demonstrate a high level of musical ability and understanding.

“There are universities across the country that are starting to look at different opportunities for students to get into (these programs),” Raiber said. “Looking at different programs and giving them a space where they could come in as a guitar major (or) as a jazz bassist, things along those lines – they provide more opportunities, but they’re rare.”

Baumgartner suggested implementing a variety of technological tools available to students of this generation, such as digital programs found on iPhones, tablets and computers, to make music programs more accessible to students.

“We have to challenge ourselves as teachers to stay up to date and keep up with this and find ways to reach kids where their interests lie,” Baumgartner said. “I think there are a lot of rewards and things to learn from playing an acoustic instrument that you might not be able to learn by doing or playing or making music on a (tech) app. ”

Baumgartner said OU electronic music composers have implemented some of these tactics, but, in general, he thinks music programs need to offer more diverse courses for popular music, guitar lessons, rock band lessons and tech apps like GarageBand.

Rabier agreed that different types of music taught and used in classrooms would not only diversify students’ interest in music, but also encourage all students to have a passion for their musical education. In her own classroom, Raiber uses a modern approach to her band by allowing students to bring their own music, as it is appropriate for the school.

By allowing students to contribute and write their own music, Raiber encouraged students to better express themselves through form, he said.

“Opening those doors for these kids to work through those personal life experiences and share the power of music to be able to help them express that themselves, to me, that’s the most powerful expression of musical education that we can obtain”, says Raïber. “Giving them those opportunities is what we are working towards.

Music, the three educators agreed, is not just fundamental to students everywhere, but to human nature as a whole.

“Music isn’t something that’s just made for our leisure,” Raiber said. “It’s not something that’s just done by gifted and talented people. It’s not something we do because we have nothing else to do. It is essential to our (humanity). You have to make music. It’s part of who we are.

Baumgartner said music is something everyone does innately, whether it’s professional musicians or children singing nursery rhymes at a playground.

“Music is part of human existence,” Baumgartner said. “People are naturally drawn to it and a lot of people naturally want to participate. Music and the arts bring a lot of culture and humanity to everyday life and to what we do.

Both in self-expression and enjoyment, students can greatly benefit from music. As music education professionals Baumgartner, Haley and Raiber have said, their goal is to inspire the passion and knowledge they have for music in their students.

“My number one goal for (my students) is for them to come away with an increased appreciation and love for music,” Haley said. “I don’t need them to go out there and be the next greatest bandleader. If they can just incorporate music into their daily lives, whether it’s just listening to the radio, playing an instrument, or participating in a community ensemble. My goal is for them to just understand the music and enjoy it and it can somehow improve their life in the future.

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Industry professionals serving music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/industry-professionals-serving-music-education/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 09:56:15 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/industry-professionals-serving-music-education/ Supporting access to quality music education is part of our core mission at the HarrisonParrott Foundation, so we welcomed the National Plan for Music Education (NPME) released in June this year. It offers an up-to-date and much-needed strategy focused on responsive and participatory musical engagement, and an appreciation of the multidimensionality of the music industry […]]]>

Supporting access to quality music education is part of our core mission at the HarrisonParrott Foundation, so we welcomed the National Plan for Music Education (NPME) released in June this year. It offers an up-to-date and much-needed strategy focused on responsive and participatory musical engagement, and an appreciation of the multidimensionality of the music industry and related skills.

Access to quality music education must be democratized and simplified. For many years, the highest quality musical education has been reserved for the privileged, namely those who have access to the time, money and resources necessary to acquire a musical instrument, take lessons and commit with ensembles, whether locally, regionally or nationally. The transformative qualities of music and the putative range of prosocial and well-being benefits must be accessible to all young people, whether their long-term engagement is responsive or participatory.

The NPME offers a range of new initiatives and guidelines that truly put music back on the curriculum map, despite its non-statutory status. As an industry professional and charity manager, I now want to know how I can do more with my skills and resources to help NPME achieve its goals.

The need for new innovations

The NPME identifies three key players in a young person’s musical education; educators (schools and higher education institutions), hubs and industry at large. The plan is incredibly compelling about why quality music education is so important, but, from an industry perspective, it’s about showcasing new and innovative solutions to how the music industry music can support the plan coming to fruition.

In fact, the NPME really offers only two concrete proposals for how the industry can and should play a greater role in the music education ‘ecosystem’: through the provision of paid internships; and through Music Hub partnerships, where hubs will host workshops, career fairs, and other events that allow students to engage with industry professionals.

Both suggestions seem obvious, and with good reason, as they are great mechanisms for young people to experience the world of music work, learn basic skills, and better understand day-to-day operations.

However, as a music professional, I started reading the NPME full of curiosity and an open mind about new innovative solutions that could be presented to industry professionals to help them improve the offer. of music education. I can only speak for our organization, but HarrisonParrott already offers high-paying internships (in partnership with Creative Access) and has a successful partnership with TriBorough Music Hub, among other organizations.

Can’t we do more? The NPME itself states that “although great work is already underway, more needs to be done to join it effectively” – but it offers no such inventions.

Funding to level the playing field

As a first step, perhaps we need to level the playing field. Music professionals who do not work in hubs or educational institutions are unlikely to have a clear understanding of what education is on offer. present, of the desired educational offer or, above all, of the way in which they can help.

One of the NPME’s suggestions is that all music hubs hire a volunteer professional musician to champion music education and serve as a role model for young people. This does not offer clear guidance as to how support can be most meaningfully applied. It is also disappointing to see, especially in this context, the services of musicians being solicited without remuneration (an eternal problem for artists).

Funding is described as a limitation of the NPME in the Independent Society of Musicians’ (highly recommended) analysis of the plan. Could the music industry fill some of these funding gaps by investing in the future of the industry through a sponsorship or scholarship program? Such a program could help fund travel costs for music lessons, concert tickets, or ancillary skills programs.

Engage industry at every step

The NPME offers clear strategies on how the music industry can support young people in higher education to enter music careers. But is it possible that the music industry is more involved before this entry point?

The plan suggests annual trips to attend live music performances to explore live music and meet music professionals. Wouldn’t it also be effective to bring industry resources and skills into schools, showcasing the diversity of roles, role models and pathways to industry careers?

It highlights how a quality music education can lead to a wide range of careers. But it’s also important to flip that notion around and demonstrate that the music industry has a role for everyone. For example, lawyers, accountants, engineers, and designers all work in industry, alongside the more obvious career paths.

At the tertiary level, the plan suggests that all T-level music technology students should engage in an industry placement program. Could this be extended to a wider group of music students? Similarly, could UK Music and the Music Academic Partnership expand their industry partnerships? For example, there are few representatives from the main classical music organizations in the UK, where I come from.

In search of answers

In direct response to these ‘how’ thoughts, the HarrisonParrott Foundation, in conjunction with the Tri-Borough Music Hub, designed the ‘Music Business Meets Music Education’ symposium, held in November at Hammersmith’s St Paul’s Centre. The symposium is designed as an opportunity to bring together all of the professionals featured in the NPME – educators, centers and industry professionals – to discuss how partnerships and programs can be established or improved to better meet the needs of young people. .

We don’t claim to have the answers. Indeed, the symposium aims to create a space where the thought leadership of the experts themselves can flourish. This is an opportunity to share ideas, form partnerships and collaborations, and creatively imagine and design solutions for the music industry to better work with music educators to deliver education. holistic and inspiring music to young people.

Music industry professionals, as evidenced by their strong involvement in the genesis of the NPME, are committed to supporting the next generation of industry professionals – now let’s see together how.

Lissy Kelleher-Clarke is Head of Art Operations and Digital Transformation at HarrisonParrott Ltd and Head of The HarrisonParrott Foundation.

www.harrisonparrott.com
@harrisonparrott

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The measure relating to artistic and musical education does not arouse any organized opposition https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-measure-relating-to-artistic-and-musical-education-does-not-arouse-any-organized-opposition/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 06:24:14 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-measure-relating-to-artistic-and-musical-education-does-not-arouse-any-organized-opposition/ | Photo courtesy of Ian D. Keating/PxHere (CC BY 2.0) By STEVEN HERBERT Proposition 28 from Tuesday’s ballot would provide additional funding for arts and music education in public schools without raising taxes, and it has drawn no organized opposition. What funders have dubbed “The Arts and Music in Schools – Funding Guarantee Accountability Act” […]]]>

| Photo courtesy of Ian D. Keating/PxHere (CC BY 2.0)

By STEVEN HERBERT

Proposition 28 from Tuesday’s ballot would provide additional funding for arts and music education in public schools without raising taxes, and it has drawn no organized opposition.

What funders have dubbed “The Arts and Music in Schools – Funding Guarantee Accountability Act” would allocate 1% of state and local funding required for public schools each year to supplement funding for arts and music education in all schools. K-12 public schools, including charter schools.

The initiative would allocate a greater proportion of funds to schools serving the most economically disadvantaged students. Schools with 500 or more students would be required to spend at least 80% of the funding on employing teachers and the rest on training, supplies and educational partnerships.

Passing the initiative would lead to increased spending on arts education in schools, likely in the range of $800 million to $1 billion per year, starting in the 2023-24 school year. according to an analysis by legislative analyst Gabriel Petek and Keely Martin Bosler, the director of the Department of Finance.

Austin Beutner, the former Los Angeles Unified School District superintendent who drafted the measure, called it “a passion project of mine.”

“My family moved many times when I was young and I attended many different elementary schools,” Beutner told City News Service. “As a shy kid entering a new fifth-grade class in the middle of a school year, my concern wasn’t reading or math. It was who I went to lunch with on my first day of school. since I didn’t know anyone.

“Fortunately, a teacher invited me to a music lesson at lunchtime. The cello became bass then guitar. With that came a sense of agency and trust. I could perform in front of thousands of people before I could speak in front of dozens. But it all started with a group of friends and a sense of belonging that I found in that fifth-grade music class.

Beutner said during his three years as superintendent, “I visited hundreds of schools and always asked what I could do to help.”

“Invariably, someone at school — a teacher, student, or family member — would tell me they wish their school had a more comprehensive arts or music curriculum,” Beutner said. “Every student in every school should have the opportunity to participate in artistic or musical activities.”

No arguments against Proposition 28 were submitted for the Official Voter Information Guide.

Beutner donated $4.2 million to the campaign on behalf of Proposition 28, while the political arm of the California Teachers Association donated $2.5 million and the Fender Musical Instruments Corp. $1.2 million, according to the Secretary of State’s office. Los Angeles Clippers owner Steven Ballmer and actress Monica Horan donated $1 million each.

Horan is best known for her recurring role as Amy MacDougall on the 1996-2005 CBS comedy “Everybody Loves Raymond,” which her husband Philip Rosenthal created and produced.

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‘Alphabet’ Songs: Googler Orchestra performs benefit concert for youth music education program | New https://russjohnsonmusic.com/alphabet-songs-googler-orchestra-performs-benefit-concert-for-youth-music-education-program-new/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 20:20:05 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/alphabet-songs-googler-orchestra-performs-benefit-concert-for-youth-music-education-program-new/ Singer Brian Hinman, who performs with Chanticleer, will narrate Googler Orchestra’s performance “The Orchestra Games,” which introduces children to orchestral instruments. Courtesy music for minors via Facebook. The Googler Orchestra, a symphony orchestra made up of Alphabet employees, interns and associates that formed in 2016, will perform a family concert to benefit the nonprofit Music […]]]>

Singer Brian Hinman, who performs with Chanticleer, will narrate Googler Orchestra’s performance “The Orchestra Games,” which introduces children to orchestral instruments. Courtesy music for minors via Facebook.

The Googler Orchestra, a symphony orchestra made up of Alphabet employees, interns and associates that formed in 2016, will perform a family concert to benefit the nonprofit Music for Minors on Sunday, November 6. at 4 p.m. at Gunn High School’s Spangenberg. Theater, 780 Arastradero Road, Palo Alto.

The 90-minute concert, which is recommended for audiences ages 5 and up, will include a performance of “The Orchestra Games”, which introduces children to orchestral instruments in the style of the Olympic Games, with “teams” in competition. (the different sections of the orchestra), narrated by vocalist Brian Hinman. Selections from “Carmen” will also be played.

Music for Minors is an organization that brings music education to local elementary school students. Proceeds from the event will be used to fund scholarships for underprivileged schools. Tickets are $10 to $25. More information is available at googlerorchestra.com and mfm.org.

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From Litchfield High School to an exciting career teaching music | Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/from-litchfield-high-school-to-an-exciting-career-teaching-music-education/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 17:12:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/from-litchfield-high-school-to-an-exciting-career-teaching-music-education/ Music was an integral part of Martha Thoralson’s family life. Even before making music her career, Martha left a musical legacy at Litchfield High School. The combination made her an obvious choice for posthumous induction into the Litchfield High School Hall of Fame. She was born in Litchfield in July 1920, daughter of Daynor and […]]]>

Music was an integral part of Martha Thoralson’s family life. Even before making music her career, Martha left a musical legacy at Litchfield High School.

The combination made her an obvious choice for posthumous induction into the Litchfield High School Hall of Fame.

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Online Music Education Market Regional Outlook, In-Depth https://russjohnsonmusic.com/online-music-education-market-regional-outlook-in-depth/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 06:29:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/online-music-education-market-regional-outlook-in-depth/ The global online music education market size was 130.7 million US$ in 2020 and is projected to reach 421.9 million US$ by the end of 2027, growing at a CAGR by 18.4% from 2022 to 2027. Astute Analytica compiled this research report after gathering input from various industry experts. The market has been studied using […]]]>

The global online music education market size was 130.7 million US$ in 2020 and is projected to reach 421.9 million US$ by the end of 2027, growing at a CAGR by 18.4% from 2022 to 2027.

Astute Analytica compiled this research report after gathering input from various industry experts. The market has been studied using various research tools that focus on market determinants along with other widely studied market elements. Market size and market estimation are some of the key elements considered in the research report. Market analysis consists of a combination of quantitative and qualitative market analysis of data using various statistical tools.

Request to download an example of this strategic report: – https://www.astuteanalytica.com/request-sample/online-music-education-market

To analyze the market from different angles, the research report covers major market segments, which are divided into different groups and sub-groups, hence market segmentation as follows:

By device type

Piano
Guitar
Banjo
Violin
Other
By type

music history
Musicology
The theory
Others
By session type

Solo
Band
By type of organizer

Schools
Music studios/academy
Professionals
By type of learner

Beginners
Amateurs
Professional musicians
Research methodology :

To compile a market research report, analysts have adopted a basic research methodology that covers primary and secondary methods of data mining and extraction. Market forecasting is done by covering various market patterns derived from driving factors, market dynamics, economic tools, analytical tools and many more.

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Primary research:

Primary research in market research involves in-depth market analysis based on information collected through various primary methods, such as:

Interviews
Group chat
Investigations
Discussion groups
Test marketing
Comments
Much more
The data information accumulated through the above-mentioned methods is compiled in aggregate and used as a tool or study basis for market estimation and analysis.

Secondary research:

In secondary research, various sources of reliable information such as government websites and research papers are used to identify and collect the information to identify industry trends. In addition, the business analyst collects data from various sources of freely available websites and paid databases of qualitative and quantitative data.

Market segmentation on the basis of geographies is segmented as follows:

Asia Pacific
Americas
Europe, Middle East and Africa
Market players present in the global online music education market are:

Berklee College of Music,
The Juilliard School,
lesson face,
Moosiko,
musicgurus,
These players adopt various market strategies to stay ahead of the market and maintain their position in the market for a long time. Some of the market strategies are as follows:

Merger
Partnership
Acquisition
Product launches
Business expansions
Collaborations
joint venture
Other
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The market forecast depends on a thorough analysis of the spending habits during the forecast period. It provides calculated information to support the decision-making process of customers. The compiled research study presents the analysis tool in the form of a research report. The global online music education market is analyzed considering various market factors and the market estimation analysis also includes restraints and challenges. Current market trends are also taken into account when analyzing the market. The company presents an overall analysis of the market along with various trending market areas and topics.

About Astute Analytica:

Astute Analytica is a global analytics and consulting company that has built a solid reputation in a short time, thanks to the tangible results we have delivered to our clients. We pride ourselves on generating unrivaled, thorough and incredibly accurate estimates and projections for our highly demanding clients spread across different verticals. We have a long list of satisfied and repeat customers from a wide range including Technology, Healthcare, Chemicals, Semiconductors, FMCG and many more. These satisfied customers come to us from all over the world.

They are able to make well-calibrated decisions and take advantage of highly lucrative opportunities while overcoming fierce challenges, all because we analyze for them the complex business environment, existing and emerging opportunities by segment, technology formations , growth estimates and even the strategic choices available. . In short, a complete package. All of this is possible because we have a team of highly qualified, knowledgeable and experienced professionals including business analysts, economists, consultants and technology experts. In our list of priorities, you, our patron, come first. If you decide to engage with us, you can be sure of the best value-added and cost-effective package from us.

Contact us:

Phone number: +18884296757

Email: sales@astuteanalytica.com

Visit our website: https://www.astuteanalytica.com/

This press release was published on openPR.

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Sharing the Sound: Eastwood seeks to bring music education to others | Mclean County https://russjohnsonmusic.com/sharing-the-sound-eastwood-seeks-to-bring-music-education-to-others-mclean-county/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/sharing-the-sound-eastwood-seeks-to-bring-music-education-to-others-mclean-county/ When Island native Pamela Eastwood was 9, she received a gift that marked the start of her career in music and education. “I don’t remember asking for it; I just remember that on Christmas, ‘Santa Claus’ brought me an electric keyboard…and I thought it was awesome,” Eastwood, 44, said. “…And then it became , ‘Oh, […]]]>

When Island native Pamela Eastwood was 9, she received a gift that marked the start of her career in music and education.

“I don’t remember asking for it; I just remember that on Christmas, ‘Santa Claus’ brought me an electric keyboard…and I thought it was awesome,” Eastwood, 44, said. “…And then it became , ‘Oh, we’re going to take piano lessons.’

“In hindsight, I asked my mother, ‘How could I have come to this?’ and she’s like, ‘Oh, you asked for music lessons.’ ”

Although Eastwood does not recall the conversation, she began taking lessons in March 1988 with Florence Stodghill at Livermore until her second year of high school.

As a student at McLean County High School, Eastwood played trumpet in the marching band and was also involved in concert and cheering bands.

She found playing the trumpet “a lot of fun” and began to get to know musicians like jazz trumpeter Doc Severinsen, who led the NBC orchestra on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” and even saw Severinsen perform. perform live at Madisonville Community College.

“For me, it was just awesome, and I just think, ‘I want to play like Doc Severinsen,'” Eastwood said. “…So, I hit the ground training more and more. I spent hours a day training…”

Years later, in 2004, Eastwood met Severinsen at a trumpet conference in Denver where they took pictures together and she got to share with him the influence he had on her career.

“He was just honored,” she said, “and … he was like, ‘Do you mind if I have my picture taken with you?’ … I felt privileged at that time.

Eastwood didn’t major in music when she enrolled at the University of New Mexico in 1996, though she had the opportunity to perform with the then president’s cheer band , Bill Clinton, during a re-election campaign in Albuquerque in the late 90s.

“…I started out as a biology student and I just didn’t feel it,” she said. “I was a minor in music. and I just didn’t know (what to do), so I took a lot of classes that I couldn’t get here… like archeology classes, a lot of ancient Mesoamerican history – all that.

After about a year and a half to two years, Eastwood returned home and took classes at Owensboro Community College (now Owensboro Community & Technical College) to complete her associate’s degree.

It was a conversation with her mother that helped Eastwood see what she should pursue.

“It was during that semester that my mom said to me, ‘Have you ever thought about majoring in music?’ she says. “She’s like, ‘You keep talking about these other careers, but you keep (come back) to music?’

“…I’ve always thought about keeping music in my life; I just didn’t know this was going to become my life.

Eastwood then studied music and education at the University of Kentucky before the curriculum changed to focus more on the performance aspect. She transferred to Eastern Kentucky University, which seemed to fit her overall goal better.

“I (really) wanted that part of education,” she said. “…In my freshman year of high school, I auditioned for the Governor’s School for the Arts, and I had taken classes and we worked on different things.”

During his lessons, Eastwood said the emphasis was more on technique than music theory. When she arrived at the audition, Eastwood was able to play two scales before a judge asked her to play a scale that was foreign to her.

Although she got it right after some advice from the judge, Eastwood remembers how she felt after he left.

“I walked out and thought, ‘There are more ladders? What am I missing?’ she said. “…I just felt like I was missing stuff, so as I went to college and learned the theory…I started to say, ‘How could I take what I learned in college as far as what I thought I should have learned earlier and start integrating that? » ”

After graduating from EKU in 2004, Eastwood traveled to Indiana to teach music in the school systems, starting first in Marion before moving to the Fort Wayne Community Schools District for eight year.

“I love working with children; I love teaching them music,” she said. “That mesh over there – I love it.”

She eventually moved closer to her hometown, teaching in Hardin County for about three years before returning to the island last year.

Eastwood began giving private lessons in 2018 focusing on piano, guitar, trumpet, ukulele, vocals and more, which quickly grew into a full-time activity.

“The next thing I know is that I have 43 lessons a week,” she said.

And though Eastwood said COVID has caused a little hiccup, she still looks after local students and those with military families in Alaska and Texas, she is able to instruct via Zoom.

Eastwood finds being able to be part of a student’s introduction to learning an instrument to be a “heartwarming” experience and enjoys seeing them grow through the process.

“For me, those are the great times when kids can say ‘oops’ and fix (the mistakes) themselves,” she said. “As I always tell my kids, my job here is to get you where you don’t need me. I love that they need me, but I want to be the one sitting here and saying, “You did it.” You did it all alone. … I love it when they can use their knowledge and run with it.

For Eastwood, her main goal is to be able to educate people about something she loves.

“…I know I don’t want to be paid to perform as a performer as long as I enjoy teaching,” Eastwood said. “Making sure everyone knows something about music is more my passion. …For me, it’s all about sharing information.

“Music is everywhere – and I just feel like everyone should have the chance to learn. … I just have this dream of everyone having music in one way or another in his life.

If you’d like to talk to Eastwood about classes, contact her at facebook.com/pamela.e.seidl.

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