Music instrument – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 04:20:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png Music instrument – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Texas School’s Musical Instrument Repair Class is America’s First – NBC 5 Dallas-Fort Worth https://russjohnsonmusic.com/texas-schools-musical-instrument-repair-class-is-americas-first-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 04:20:18 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/texas-schools-musical-instrument-repair-class-is-americas-first-nbc-5-dallas-fort-worth/ Each afternoon they come from Arlington ISD Schools to the Center for Visual and Performing Arts. They come in, take an instrument and tear it to pieces. It’s a musical instrument repair course, much like a brass repair shop. Students learn to work, refine and repair the tools that make music. “I never realized it […]]]>

Each afternoon they come from Arlington ISD Schools to the Center for Visual and Performing Arts. They come in, take an instrument and tear it to pieces.

It’s a musical instrument repair course, much like a brass repair shop. Students learn to work, refine and repair the tools that make music.

“I never realized it would be like a whole career,” said Aidan Jackson, a student in the program.

Jackson plays the flute and thought that knowing the workings of his instrument might help him play better.

“I have a better understanding of the instruments I’ve worked on before,” Jackson said.

Students learn all the ins and outs of repair, and many of them don’t play instruments but pursue it as a very lucrative and in-demand career choice.

“We don’t have as many people coming in to take those spots and that’s why a program like this has become so valuable,” said teacher Joseph Strohl. “You have to have a very sharp mind about how things work and what the problem is.”


NBCDFW.com

Learn to apply just enough heat to break the bonds, but not too much to burn the brass.

“I love how tedious it is, I love fixing things with my hands,” said Andreah Moreano, a student who plays three instruments and plans to major in music.

While she works to compose and produce the next big thing, instrument repair can help her pay for her education and pay her bills.

The instruments are all end-of-life, donated to the program, and help spark interest in a field of study that is no longer as popular as it once was. It’s perfect for students who enjoy challenges, problem solving, and working with their hands to help their careers and goals in a symphony of sound just as rewarding as an actual orchestra.



NBCDFW.com

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Ongoing musical instrument drive for Columbus students https://russjohnsonmusic.com/ongoing-musical-instrument-drive-for-columbus-students/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 01:04:17 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/ongoing-musical-instrument-drive-for-columbus-students/ COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — Starting this weekend, you can donate an instrument to benefit Columbus City schools and other local youth organizations. NBC4 is a proud sponsor of the Gift of Music instrument player, which has received 2,200 instruments since its launch in 2019. These instruments cost a total of $250,000, giving students and children […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — Starting this weekend, you can donate an instrument to benefit Columbus City schools and other local youth organizations.

NBC4 is a proud sponsor of the Gift of Music instrument player, which has received 2,200 instruments since its launch in 2019.

These instruments cost a total of $250,000, giving students and children around the world the chance to try out music without fear of not being able to afford an instrument.

It also gives instruments that are no longer in use a new home.

At Saturday’s drop off, a mother whose son died donated her electric guitar in hopes it will end up in the hands of someone who will appreciate it.

“There are kids whose families don’t have the means or the money to get them the instrument, so it helps to get the instruments into the hands of those kids and they can find out if music is their passion or if it’s their group of friends to pass high school, to finish school, so it opens up the world to them, ”said Kevin Johnson, owner of the Music Go Round stores, which serve as drop-off points for the instrument player.

The drive runs until September 4. For more information on when and where instruments can be donated, click here.

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Steelpan Musical Instrument in Trinidad History and Sound Honored by Google Doodle https://russjohnsonmusic.com/steelpan-musical-instrument-in-trinidad-history-and-sound-honored-by-google-doodle/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 16:02:53 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/steelpan-musical-instrument-in-trinidad-history-and-sound-honored-by-google-doodle/ Today, July 26, Google Doodle is celebrating a musical journey. The search engine celebrates the steelpan, an acoustic musical instrument made of 55-gallon steel drums illustrated by Trinidad and Tobago-based artist Nicholas Huggins. According to Google’s Doodle Archive, the steelpan was developed in the 20th century and originated in the Caribbean islands in the 1930s. […]]]>

Today, July 26, Google Doodle is celebrating a musical journey. The search engine celebrates the steelpan, an acoustic musical instrument made of 55-gallon steel drums illustrated by Trinidad and Tobago-based artist Nicholas Huggins.

According to Google’s Doodle Archive, the steelpan was developed in the 20th century and originated in the Caribbean islands in the 1930s. However, its origins date back to the 1700s.

Steelpan musical instrument in the history of Trinidad, the sound is honored by Google Doodle

The instrument was used during Carnival and Canboulay, the annual harvest festivals celebrated in Trinidad and it is still used in contemporary music.

Doodle celebrates his journey today because on July 26, 1951, the Trinidad All-Steel Pan Percussion Orchestra (TASPO) introduced a new musical genre to the world while presenting steelpan at the Festival of Britain.

History of Steel Pan

In the 1700s, when enslaved Africans were brought to Trinidad in the West Indies by colonialists, they also brought their heritage and drumming traditions with them.

According to Google’s Art and Culter, after the abolition of slavery in 1834, Trinidadians participated in Trinidad carnival celebrations with their drums.

However, performances of music of African origin have been targeted by restrictive government bills, sparking protests and demonstrations. According to the search engine, these protests have facilitated the development of new instruments.

It was improvised using scrap metal, metal containers, trash cans and bamboo stamping tubes. The first instrument that developed in the evolution of Steelpan was Tamboo Bamboo.

These bamboo strips are made from pieces of bamboo cut to different lengths so that different pitches can be achieved, and now they are widely accepted and used as precursors to modern steel strips.

According to Culture Mix, these instruments were first seen on BBC television in June 1950, when dancers from Trinidad and the Caribbean performed with a steel band on its television show, Bal Creole.

And with this exhibition, in 1951, TASPO was invited to perform on the Southbank in London as part of the “Festival of Britain”. It was the first time that the British public came into direct contact with the instrument.

TASPO

TASPO was formed for the ‘Festival of Britain’ in 1951. It was the first steel band to use recycled instruments such as oil drums.

According to Culture Mix, TASPO was a group of 12 top pan musicians.

These musicians were selected from 70 Trinidad Steel bands, including Ellie Mannette of ‘Invaders’, Sterling Betancourt of ‘Crossfire’, Philmore ‘Boots’ Davidson of ‘Syncopators’, Belgrave Bonaparte of ‘Southern Symphony’ and Andrew ‘Pan’ De Labastide de ‘Hill 60 and many more.

According to Google records, the Steelpan is now a national instrument of Trinidad and Tobago and is a true source of resilience for its citizens. This instrument is now also seen in concerts at the Royal Albert Hall, Carnegie Hall and among others.

Whether in Japan, the UK or any other country, Steelpan is now an internationally recognized instrument around the world.

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Narasinganpettai nagaswaram: The classical wind musical instrument which now has a GI tag https://russjohnsonmusic.com/narasinganpettai-nagaswaram-the-classical-wind-musical-instrument-which-now-has-a-gi-tag/ Thu, 31 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/narasinganpettai-nagaswaram-the-classical-wind-musical-instrument-which-now-has-a-gi-tag/ The nagaswaram, the classical wind musical instrument made by the craftsmen of Narasinganpettai, has been awarded the Geographical Indication (GI) label. Narasinganpettai, a small village 15 km from Kumbakonam in Tanjore district, has traditional nagaswaram makers. Even though nagaswarams are made in many other parts of the state, only Barinagaswaram of Narasinganpettai makes Madhyamam Swara […]]]>

The nagaswaram, the classical wind musical instrument made by the craftsmen of Narasinganpettai, has been awarded the Geographical Indication (GI) label.

Narasinganpettai, a small village 15 km from Kumbakonam in Tanjore district, has traditional nagaswaram makers. Even though nagaswarams are made in many other parts of the state, only Barinagaswaram of Narasinganpettai makes Madhyamam Swara commonly.

From royal courts and temples to weddings and festivals, this classic instrument is part of every auspicious event and artists have preserved the art of nagaswaram for over 300 years.

The story of Narasinganpettai nagaswaram

Before the Barinagaswaram, musicians used the ‘timiri nagaswaram’. In the timiri nagaswaram, the musicians find it difficult to play the madhyamam swara.

It was the legendary nagaswaram maestro TN Rajarathinam Pillai who wanted Narasinganpettai nagaswaram maker Ranganatha Aachari to look into this matter. Ranganathan then went to Srirangam to learn the techniques and then came up with six modified nagaswarams. TNR fell in love with it and played these modified nagaswarams until the end.

According to the book Nine Rupees An Hour, even before the establishment of the Barinagaswaram, TNRajarathinam Pillai performed the Shanmugapriya ragam on Narasinganpettai Nagaswaram in front of Jawaharlal Nehru and other leaders on August 15, 1947 in Delhi.

Sathish Selvaraj, the fifth generation nagaswaram craftsman in his family, says the tradition was started by Govindasamy, and future generations – Govindasamy’s son Narayanasamy, grandson Ranganathan and great-grandson Selvaraj – pursued her. Now Selvaraj’s two sons – Sathish and Prakash – are actively involved in handcrafting nagaswarams.

Selvaraj and Sathish doing Nagaswaram. (Photo: special arrangement)

“Do you know the song Nalandana by Thillana Mohanambal? In this song they used bari nagaswaram which was made by my grandfather. In Timiri nagaswaram, “nadham” never mixed with the human voice. Everything changed after this modification, you know. I’m really proud of my grandfather,” says Sathish Selvaraj.

“It is sad to see that the number of luthiers is diminishing in the region where once the work of making classical instruments was flourishing and where famous maestros waited in front of our “pattarais” (workshops). Until today, we make the nagaswaram by hand for two reasons. Reason: Craftsmen used to work with my dad and shared all the ups and downs together. If we modernize the techniques, they would lose their livelihood. Secondly, the company “NR Nagaswaram” is named after its fine handmade products. We don’t want to destroy that name,” Sathish added.

Prakash learned all the techniques from his father while his older brother Sathish stayed away from nagaswaram and wanted to earn his living in a different field. But the sudden disappearance of their father forced him to take care of their family business for the immense love he has for his father.

Asked about profit from nagaswaram, Sathish replied, “There is no profit, I can say. Getting money for our working hours is also impossible.

“In our investment, the Aachamaram or Indian blackwood and rain tree wood cost the maximum. We cannot estimate how many nagaswarams can be made with the items we purchase. Indian blackwood must have more 80 to 100 years old so that the saliva collected inside the instrument will not affect the nagaswaram and tonal quality.If the inside of the wood is cracked, we can’t use it.We also have to pay our associates. My brother and I work out of passion but must respect the work of the workers and pay them well. To some extent, we can get a decent profit at the beginning of the Margazhi season. The rest of the year is a situation disastrous for manufacturers,” he said.

During Margazhi season, each nagaswaram costs around 7,000 to 8,000 rupees.

The process of making Narasinganpettai nagaswaram

Sathish describes the process of making the classical instrument. Narasinganpettai nagaswaram is 2 to 2.5 feet long and has three parts. The long cylindrical block is composed of Aachaamaram. The wood comes from the Karaikudi, Vellore, Thiruvannamalai of Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh. The upper end of the block measures 1.75 inches, into which the sevaali reed, a handmade mouthpiece, is inserted. Seevaali are made from Korukkai thattai naanal, a type of reed that grows in the Cauvery River. The bottom of the block measures 2.25 to 2.5 inches. The megaphone, like the Anasu part, made from the rain tree, is attached to the lower part of the block.

Reed mouthpiece. (To express)

According to Sathish and other traditional nagaswaram craftsmen, Indian blackwood is salvaged from demolished bungalows and palatial houses in the Chettinad region. If there are no intermediaries, they pay 40,000 to 50,000 rupees for a big pillar. But it costs more when intermediaries are involved in the purchase.

“I don’t know if there is a way to increase the premium price of Nagaswarams through this GI label announcement. But it still makes me happy that the unique methods we use in making nagaswaram have been recognized,” says Gunasekharan, another craftsman from Narasinganpettai.

“Few families only do Nagaswaram and the men in my age group teach the methods to the younger ones. I couldn’t do that since I have two daughters. Both are married and their husbands have no interest in finding out. People from other local villages also make nagaswaram but for the best and clear Madhyamam Swara, musicians should come and buy the instrument here only,” Gunasekharan said.

Anasu. (To express)

“I have spent over 20 years of my life researching and facilitating the GI labeling process for unique Tamil Nadu products. This is the 27th product I have worked with,” says P Sanjay Gandhi, Nodal Officer of State GI Registered Products.

“In all the southern states, musicians play the same kind of instruments. Thus, the prevalence of duplicates is also common. Getting a GI for Narasinganpettai nagaswaram will greatly reduce the circulation of duplicates which can help mainstream manufacturers make decent profits for their fine products and brand value will also increase. Once people start to understand the importance of these products, they tend to spend more on them,” he said.

Gandhi suggested that to increase production, the HR&CE department of Tamil Nadu can request major temples in the state to purchase Narasinganpettai nagaswarams for auspicious play during poojas, adding that the department can also sponsor temples for buy one.

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A virtual reality musical instrument built from a spider’s web https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-virtual-reality-musical-instrument-built-from-a-spiders-web/ Tue, 22 Mar 2022 09:51:41 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-virtual-reality-musical-instrument-built-from-a-spiders-web/ Researchers have transformed the 3D structure of a spider’s web into melodies, collaborating with artist Tomás Saraceno to develop Spider weban engaging musical tool. The researchers then refined and expanded on their earlier efforts, including adding a dynamic virtual reality element that allows users to access and play with the web. Not only can this […]]]>

Researchers have transformed the 3D structure of a spider’s web into melodies, collaborating with artist Tomás Saraceno to develop Spider weban engaging musical tool.

The researchers then refined and expanded on their earlier efforts, including adding a dynamic virtual reality element that allows users to access and play with the web. Not only can this study help their understanding of the three-dimensional design of a spider’s web, but it can also help our understanding of the vibrational speech of spiders, the scientists say. Because they cannot see clearly, they sense their surroundings via tremors of varying speeds.

To study the construction of such webs, the researchers locked a species of tropical tent-web spider in a square cage and sat there waiting for it to occupy the area with a 3D web. They then illuminated and created high-quality photographs of two-dimensional cross-sections of the lattice using a sheet laser.

The 3D design of the net was then collectively stitched together using a uniquely created mathematical formula from all of these 2D cross views. To convert this into melodies, various audio frequencies were assigned to various cords. The sounds thus created were then sung in rhythms inspired by the architecture of the web.

While Spider’s Canvas allows people to perceive the spider’s song, the perspective of virtual reality, which allows people to access and interact with web strands themselves, offers a whole new depth of immersion. , the experts said.

Perhaps most intriguingly, the effort allowed scientists to devise a mathematical model to identify the tremors produced by a spider’s web and convert them into “prey captured”, “web in progress” or “another spider came with sexual expectations”.

They are now trying to produce composite pulses that will allow them to communicate in the language of spiders. In order to connect with them, we can introduce them to specific rhythms or vibrational patterns.

Previous results were published in the Royal Society Interface Journal.

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Classical wind musical instrument narasinghapettai nagaswaram gets GI tag – The New Indian Express https://russjohnsonmusic.com/classical-wind-musical-instrument-narasinghapettai-nagaswaram-gets-gi-tag-the-new-indian-express/ Mon, 21 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/classical-wind-musical-instrument-narasinghapettai-nagaswaram-gets-gi-tag-the-new-indian-express/ By Express press service THANJAVUR: The Narasinghapettai nagaswaram, a classical wind musical instrument traditionally made by artisans based in a village near Kumbakonam, has been awarded the Geographical Indication (GI) label. The Narasinghapettai Nagaswarammade in a village near Kumbakonam Government Advocate and Nodal Officer for Tamil Nadu Government Products GI Registration, P Sanjai Gandhi said […]]]>

By Express press service

THANJAVUR: The Narasinghapettai nagaswaram, a classical wind musical instrument traditionally made by artisans based in a village near Kumbakonam, has been awarded the Geographical Indication (GI) label.

The Narasinghapettai Nagaswaram
made in a village near Kumbakonam

Government Advocate and Nodal Officer for Tamil Nadu Government Products GI Registration, P Sanjai Gandhi said on Sunday that the label application was filed on behalf of Thanjavur Musical Instruments Workers Co-operative Cottage Industrial Society Limited and facilitated by his team.

The GI Registry issued registration certificate number 420 dated January 21, 2022. The application was originally filed on January 31, 2014, he added.

Gandhi said artisans based in the village of Narasinganpettai, who inherited the making of these wooden instruments from their ancestors, make them through a process that requires specialized skills. The nagaswaram now used by performers is called “pari nagaswaram”, which is longer than the “thimiri”.

Much of “Narasinghapettai nagaswaram” is made from the aacha tree (Hardwickia binata) and craftsmen often use wood from parts of old houses, he said. Artisans use drills, in addition to carpentry tools, to make the nagaswarams which are widely performed in functions such as weddings and temple festivals.

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My background: Violinist Lisa Archontidi-Tsaldaraki, Benslow Music Instrument Loan Scheme | To concentrate https://russjohnsonmusic.com/my-background-violinist-lisa-archontidi-tsaldaraki-benslow-music-instrument-loan-scheme-to-concentrate/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 10:13:02 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/my-background-violinist-lisa-archontidi-tsaldaraki-benslow-music-instrument-loan-scheme-to-concentrate/ Until 8th grade, I played a full-size Stradivari-style Jay Haide model that was good enough for that grade. However, when I joined Mrs. Emanuela Buta’s teaching studio and was asked to learn Bruch’s Concerto, I realized that the instrument had certain limitations and its lack of complexity made unclear sound in fast passages. Coincidentally, I […]]]>

Until 8th grade, I played a full-size Stradivari-style Jay Haide model that was good enough for that grade. However, when I joined Mrs. Emanuela Buta’s teaching studio and was asked to learn Bruch’s Concerto, I realized that the instrument had certain limitations and its lack of complexity made unclear sound in fast passages. Coincidentally, I noticed some friends from a youth orchestra walking around with these black violin cases labeled “Benslow,” and I got quite curious. My teacher also urged me to look for a better instrument and indeed mentioned the name of the black cases I was seeing. I contacted the Benslow Music Instrument Loan Scheme (BMILS) and within weeks I was able to borrow an instrument.

0674 before Pelozzi

The first violin I borrowed was an Antonius Pelozzi with composite volute (1753). With this instrument I successfully auditioned for the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain (NYOGB) and organized a fundraiser for them at the Bromley Youth Music Trust, where I played a recital with other young musicians. I also had the chance to have sessions with Carmine Lauri, co-leader of the London Symphony Orchestra.

About a year later, I was able to switch to the 1907 Bela Szepessy violin from BMILS. With this second violin, I successfully participated in a few local music festivals and returned for a second year at NYOGB, was shortlisted for the RPS Duet Prize, and also won the Rotary Young Musician competition of the Year (SE England and Gibraltar Quartier, 2019). Most importantly, I was accepted into my current teacher’s class, Professor Rodney Friend.

By borrowing and testing instruments, my ears gradually opened up to the sonic possibilities of finer instruments. When I acquired a French Counault (1898), it was obvious that the quest for a more expressive sound lay in a combination of the best violin and bow available.

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we prostrate ourselves

So my attention turned to the bow, and I was able to borrow a WE Hill & Sons silver mounted bow from BMILS again. This accompanied me on a tour of Germany with the Bromley Youth Chamber Orchestra as concerto leader and soloist, culminating in a concert at the Bach-Denkmal in Leipzig. This was the high point of my playing journey for me before joining the Royal Academy of Music as an undergraduate in 2019, and I am extremely grateful to BMILS for providing me with the much needed tools for such opportunities.

Benslow Music Instrument Loan Scheme (BMILS) is an inclusive and unique UK charity founded in 1932, which exists to provide talented young musicians with high quality instruments to develop their musicality. BMILS (in Hitchin, Herts) has nearly 500 borrowers and around 1,600 musical items in its custody. The program constantly strives to expand and diversify its reach and, for nine decades, has had an immense impact on the lives of thousands of young musicians and, subsequently, on the culture at large.

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The origin and mechanics of the Indian classical musical instrument Mridangam https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-origin-and-mechanics-of-the-indian-classical-musical-instrument-mridangam/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 07:38:44 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-origin-and-mechanics-of-the-indian-classical-musical-instrument-mridangam/ India was the hub of different types of art, especially music in ancient times. One of the oldest and most important musical instruments is Mridangam Mridangam is a classical musical instrument used mainly in South Indian music. It is a popular percussion instrument, which is a double-headed drum and made of different types of wood. […]]]>

India was the hub of different types of art, especially music in ancient times. One of the oldest and most important musical instruments is Mridangam

Mridangam is a classical musical instrument used mainly in South Indian music. It is a popular percussion instrument, which is a double-headed drum and made of different types of wood. It is widely used in vocal and instrumental music presentations in South India. The instrument is also known as maddal or maddalam in some places.

Etymology

The name of the instrument is formed from the union of two Sanskrit words ‘Mrit’ and ‘Anga’. In Sanskrit, “Mrit” means clay or earth and “Anga” means member. In the early days when the instrument came into existence, the instrument was made of hardened clay. Over the years, people have started using different types of wood to increase their durability.

Story

Mridangam is known as Tannumai in Tamil culture. In ancient Tamil literature, Sangam literature, there is the first mention of Mridangam. There is a detailed reference of the instrument in the Natyasastra. It was the most widely used and important percussion instrument of the Sangam period. It was also used at the start of a war as people believed its sound was sacred and powerful enough to ward off enemy arrows and protect the king. After the Sangam period, it is mentioned in the epic ‘Silappatikaram’. In the epic, Mridangam was part of the Antarakottu, which is a musical collection played at the start of any dramatic performance. This was later developed into the iconic Bharatnatyam. The Miridangam player holds the title Tannumai aruntozhil mutalvan.

The instruments have also been mentioned in Hindu religious scriptures. It is said to have been one of the favorite instruments of the bahana of Lord Ganesha and Lord Shiva, Nandi. According to mythology, Nandi performed Mridangam during Lord Shiva’s Taandav dance. Hence, the instrument is known as Deva Vaadyam, the instrument of the gods. Another story shows that the sound of Mridangam is a recreation of the sound that was made when Lord Indra rode across the sky on his elephant. Many believe that the Tabla instrument was created by splitting a Mridangam into two.

Construction

The body of the Mridangam is carved from a single block of wood. The inside of the wooden block is hollowed out to make it hollow. Most Mridangam makers prefer Jackwood or Redwood to make it. But sometimes the kernel of a coconut and palm tree and the wood of the Morogosa tree are also used to make Mridangam nowadays. The instrument has the shape of a barrel and its left head is a little bigger than the right head. The length of the instrument is usually a foot and a half or two feet and it has a diameter of twenty-five to thirty centimeters. Preaching requires great skill to achieve perfection. On the right head of the drum there are three concentric layers of skin. The innermost layer which is the full skin is hidden from view. The concealed layer is cowhide, and sheepskin is used for the inner ring, and calfskin is used for the outer ring. Goatskin is also used in some Mridangams.

The left head has two rings: the outer ring is buffalo skin and the inner ring is sheepskin or goatskin. The two parchments are stretched and held together by a braid made of twisted leather straps. The leather straps connected to the braids can be loosened or tightened to tune the instrument. Mridangam is very closely related to another classical Pakhavaj percussion instrument which is mainly used in Hindustani traditional music of northern India.

Mridangam Schools

The first school to teach the game of Mridangam was established in the 20th century. The most famous and prominent schools of Mridangam past and present are Thanjavur school and Puddukottai school. Both schools have their distinct styles of play. Mridangam game has become very popular over the years and there are Mridangam players all over the world. It has also been adopted by various styles of music other than Indian classical music.

Notable Mridangam Players

There are great Mridangam players in the past and in the present. Some of the most notable Mridangam players across the world are Guruvayur Dorai, Anoor Anantha Krishna Sharma, Karaikudi Mani, Bombay CN Balaji, Kovai Venugopal, Mannargudi Easwaran, Prapancham Ravindran, Srimushnam Raja Rao, N. Lakshmi Ganesh, Rohan Krishnamurthy, Umayalpuram K. Sivaraman, Vasudevan Govindarajan, K. Murthy, Palghat R. Raghu, Tiruvarur Bhaktavatsalam, etc. Palghat Mani Iyer, Palani Subramanuam Pillai and CS Murugabhupathy are known as the Trinity of Midangam for their incredible contribution to art.

In modern times, Mridangam is used in Carnatic music performances. Although they are most popular in South India, they are played all over the world. It is a very popular instrument which is used in the Yakshagana orchestra as an accompaniment instrument and there it is called Maddale.

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Benslow’s Musical Instrument Lending Program Celebrates 90th Anniversary With New Building https://russjohnsonmusic.com/benslows-musical-instrument-lending-program-celebrates-90th-anniversary-with-new-building/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 10:40:34 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/benslows-musical-instrument-lending-program-celebrates-90th-anniversary-with-new-building/ The new building will provide instrument storage as well as practice space and instrument workshop space. Benslow Music Trust Chair, Judith Weir CBE, officially opened the trust’s new premises in Hertfordshire, UK. The Aston Building is the latest facility for the Benslow Musical Instrument Loan Program (BMILS), which turns 90 this year. The new […]]]>


The new building will provide instrument storage as well as practice space and instrument workshop space.

Benslow Music Trust Chair, Judith Weir CBE, officially opened the trust’s new premises in Hertfordshire, UK. The Aston Building is the latest facility for the Benslow Musical Instrument Loan Program (BMILS), which turns 90 this year.

The new building will provide a safe environment for instruments as well as spaces where students can practice and try out potential loans and workshop space for BMILS’ on-site luthier.

Etta Dainty, Head of BMILS, said, “There should be no barriers for young people to pursue their musical dreams, and at BMILS we strive to make ourselves visible and available to potential borrowers from all walks of life.”

Since its inception in 1932, BMILS has grown to become the UK’s largest musical instrument loan scheme and has facilitated the loan of instruments to young artists for the past nine decades. BMILS has helped several BBC Young Musician of the Year finalists, an RPS award winner and a BBC Guardian Young Composer award winner as well as a variety of academics.

Loans from BMILS’ collection of over 1,600 musical items are available to UK residents aged 7-25 who are currently taking a full-time music course. The program currently serves over 475 current active borrowers who pay an annual loan fee of 5% of the item’s value (bursaries are also available).

You can find more information about the Benslow Musical Instrument Lending Program here.

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Benslow’s Musical Instrument Lending Program Celebrates New Home | News https://russjohnsonmusic.com/benslows-musical-instrument-lending-program-celebrates-new-home-news/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 13:06:05 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/benslows-musical-instrument-lending-program-celebrates-new-home-news/ The Benslow Musical Instrument Lending Scheme (BMILS) celebrated the opening of the Aston Building over the weekend. Officially opened by Benslow Music Trust President Judith Weir, the new facility offers a supervised and secure environment for the instruments, a test studio, workshop space for on-site luthier Marco Matathia as well as an office and a […]]]>

The Benslow Musical Instrument Lending Scheme (BMILS) celebrated the opening of the Aston Building over the weekend. Officially opened by Benslow Music Trust President Judith Weir, the new facility offers a supervised and secure environment for the instruments, a test studio, workshop space for on-site luthier Marco Matathia as well as an office and a practice space.

The program is available to UK resident students aged 7 to 25 currently in full-time training and following a music education course. With a collection currently comprising over 1600 musical items, including stringed instruments and bows, it aims to inspire confidence in the next generation of string players by lending high quality instruments to students in need. Previous borrowers include BBC Young Musician of the Year finalists, RPS Awards winners, and many have gone on to international solo and chamber music careers.

Etta Dainty, Head of BMILS, said, “There should be no obstacles preventing young people from pursuing their musical dreams, and at BMILS we strive to make ourselves visible and available to potential borrowers from all walks of life.

“To see a young player’s face light up when they first try an instrument of much better quality than the one they had before is priceless! A whole new world of sound opens up.

The opening ceremony also included performances by two BMILS borrowers, 16-year-old violinist Olivia Trezise and 8-year-old cellist Apollo Premadasa.

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The Benslow Music Instrument Loan Scheme was founded in 1932 by Editha Knocker and Edith Croll. They wrote a letter to The temperature, calling for ‘Good Violins Lying Idle’ to be repurposed for use by promising students whose artistic development was held back by the prohibitive cost of good quality instruments. Their aims were endorsed by leading figures in the music and cultural establishment of interwar Britain, including the eminent conductor Sir Henry Wood. The program currently supports over 475 current active borrowers.

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