education program – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png education program – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Bienen School of Music Music Education Program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 06:36:28 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Podcast (nu-declassified): Listen in a new window | To download Subscribe: Spotify | Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music […]]]>

Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music teachers.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

FELIX GARKISCH: People have this stereotype of a music major. It’s like, “Oh, they don’t have to do much. All they have to do is practice their instrument or they don’t have to do any real work,” which I think is right — totally, completely wrong.

ERICA SCHMITT: It was Felix Garkisch, a freshman in the music education program at the Bienen School of Music. Félix’s main instrument is the violin.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

ERICA SCHMITT: While some Bienen students plan to play their instrument professionally, others, like Felix, strive to become teachers themselves.

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. This is NU Declassified, a look at how the Wildcats thrive and survive in Northwestern. I don’t know much about Bienen, but I always thought music was a really cool field to study at university. So, in this episode, I spoke to students and faculty in the music education program about the unique opportunities and challenges of the major. Felix said the music education major is slightly different from other Bienen majors.

FELIX GARKISCH: We have a lot of courses that we have to take by the time we graduate not only for our teaching students but also to get our teaching license. So it’s like all the other music majors. I would say that our courses are more academic, in general. There are certainly other practical or performance-based courses, like the various methods courses that I have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha Hussain is a freshman pursuing a dual degree in Music Education and Chemistry. One of the first classes she took in the music education program was Music Education 260-0, or Introduction to Music Education.

RISHA HUSSAIN: We will visit many middle schools, high schools and elementary schools in Chicago, and observe the teachers and their different styles. Teachers who are more active, teachers who let the children take the lead more, and we write a lot of observational reports and we discuss in class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha said she learned a lot about different teaching styles in her class.

RISHA HUSSAIN: In terms of teaching, we talk a lot about the types of teachers there are, so we’ll be playing with teachers who let the students do whatever they want. We call it a musical playground. So you don’t leave anything forbidden, like you sit on the floor with your children, if they are sitting on a carpet instead of standing on top of them. As body language is something we talked about a lot.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he liked the small classes in the music education program.

FELIX GARKISCH: Most of my teachers are really, really, really approachable. And that also means that even during class, they can see what your progress looks like, so even if you’re late or something, they can really, really, really easily help you out.

ERICA SCHMITT: For Risha, the program’s small size creates a sense of community and cohesiveness.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I feel like my teachers actually know me, which I guess feels a bit more like high school, at least for the standard high school experience where you have these consistent teachers. Like, if I take theory for two years, and it’s like I have this little tight-knit group of people because you usually take the same amount of time. And it’s as if you were part of the same group. And so you get to make a friend, and you feel comfortable around everyone. And then you don’t feel weird asking questions and stuff like that. It’s really nice to sit in there.

ERICA SCHMITT: In these classes, students must learn many different instruments as well as vocal and musical composition in order to prepare for the teaching environment. But on top of that, students also specialize in a specific instrument – ​​or voice.

RISHA HUSSAIN: So we have to take classes like percussion and strings and woodwinds to get used to the music that might be taught in an elementary school. And then you come into your concentration later.

ERICA SCHMITT: The music education program also offers three different paths for students to choose from: General Music Education, Instrumental Music Education, and Choral Music Education. Felix said the general track prepares students to –

FELIX GARKISCH: Entering an elementary or middle school class (and) teaching a music class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Félix pursues the instrumental music track.

FELIX GARKISH: This usually involves a band or orchestra, but it can extend to other things as well. Like, I know, some music teachers who run guitar lessons or also like music production lessons. So it’s not like the traditional stuff. There are so many things, it’s so open. And it’s really like, I can shape it however I want, which I think is really cool.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha is on the choir track.

RISHA HUSSAIN: The person who had the most impact on me was my choirmaster. And just kind of watching her watch all these kids grow up and teach and use music as a vehicle to not only talk about you know, music is pretty, but it can be a vehicle to inform a wider audience about things like social justice, and it can bring awareness to many things.

ERICA SCHMITT: Like Risha, Felix said he –

FELIX GARKISCH: Really, really admired my high school music teacher. And the experience I had in that class made me think, “Okay, I want to be able to give this to my own students one day.” So music education seems like the right choice for me.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: All music education majors must participate in a student teaching program, where they often work with certified Northwestern teachers. Each student works with two mentors during their teaching. To find out more about this, I spoke with Professor Stevi Marks, the student-teacher and assessment coordinator at Bienen.

STEVI BRANDS: So, to get a license in the state of Illinois, you must have completed all levels of prerequisite training. So that means let’s say, Erica, you came to me and said, “Man, I’m really interested, I want a high school experience.” But I love elementary kids, I’d like to be, you know, run an elementary program where I first introduce the kids to the instruments and then maybe rehearse them in middle school and then have an experience in high school. So I would be looking for something like that.

ERICA SCHMITT: Teacher mentors guide education majors through the teaching process in a hands-on environment. Marks said she matches students with mentors based on a variety of factors, asking questions like –

STEVI BRANDS: Who can we match you with that will work well for you? And do you have a car or do you rely on public transport? What kind of experiences do you want? Do you want a marching band? Do you want a mariachi? Do you want to work with a show choir or do you want to help direct the musical? We try to match our students with a position that will benefit them and really, really take them to another level as a teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he had a student teacher for his high school music program.

FELIX GARKISCH: I remember she was a music education student in the North West and she was a phenomenal teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Although the music education program is full of opportunities, it can be a heavy workload. For some dual degree students, the program can last five years.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I think mine is a bit heavier, because I have a four-year plan instead of a five-year plan but I’m, I was at 5.8 units right now. And the rest of my plan is around 6.3 to 6.8 units per quarter. And most of it is Bienen.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said the program has made some changes to its curriculum over the past few years to ease the workload for students.

STEVI BRANDS: We know that music education students have to take more credits than I think almost anyone across the University. So we were looking for ways to consolidate some of these courses. And so I incorporated some of the technical things about singing into my choral methods course, which all students have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: I asked Félix about his experience with the workload in music education classes.

FELIX GARKISCH: I mean, I love them. But they are designed to be difficult. And I appreciate that. It’s not like you can browse them all, you have to put in the effort to get a quality product out of it.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said that ultimately her goal is to motivate students to remain passionate about teaching students as she always has been.

STEVI BRANDS: Music education offers every child the opportunity to express themselves in a way that they will not find in any other discipline. And so that’s the most valid pursuit. And we need great music teachers and I’m proud to serve in that capacity. It scares me, Erica, it’s a big responsibility. These fabulous young adults are going to come out and they’re going to have their own classroom. And God willing, they’re going to make a difference like someone did in their life, a positive difference. And that’s what I think about every time I go to class.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. Thanks for listening to another episode of NU: Declassified. This episode was reported and produced by me. The Daily Northwestern’s Audio Editor is Will Clark, Digital Editor is Jordan Mangi, and Managing Editor is Isabelle Sarraf. Be sure to subscribe to The Daily Northwestern podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or SoundCloud to hear more episodes like this.

[music]

E-mail: [email protected]
Twitter: @eschmitt318

Related stories:
– Captured: Bienen’s fall concert series marks the return to in-person performances
— In Focus: Diversifying classical music through education
— NU Declassified: A Day at the Opera

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Encore: SWFL Music Education Center Unveils Career Pathway Program for Neurodivergent Student Musicians https://russjohnsonmusic.com/encore-swfl-music-education-center-unveils-career-pathway-program-for-neurodivergent-student-musicians/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/encore-swfl-music-education-center-unveils-career-pathway-program-for-neurodivergent-student-musicians/ This episode originally aired on January 31, 2022. The Southwest Florida Music and Education Center in Naples will soon be offering neurodivergent young adults a truly unique and comprehensive music education program to help them pursue careers in the music industry. Its curriculum, which was developed by the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special […]]]>

This episode originally aired on January 31, 2022.

The Southwest Florida Music and Education Center in Naples will soon be offering neurodivergent young adults a truly unique and comprehensive music education program to help them pursue careers in the music industry.

Its curriculum, which was developed by the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs, provides hands-on, career-focused music training for pre-college and college musicians who learn differently than their typical peers.

Southwest Florida Music Education Center

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Amaya Moher, inspired by the great Andrea Bocelli. When Rob Moher’s daughter graduated from high school, he struggled to find a path for her to become a professional musician, as she struggled with typical learning styles. So he worked with the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs in Boston to come up with something completely new.

The program is designed for young adults with diagnoses such as autism spectrum disorders, learning disabilities, pragmatic social communication disorders, and anxiety-related neurodiversity disorders.

The idea for the program was inspired by the founder and chair of the board of directors of the Southwest Florida Music Education Center’s daughter, who had graduated from high school but was struggling to find a path to her dream of become a professional musician.

After laying a solid foundation, the music program reinforces concepts over time to improve retention and accommodate a wide range of learning styles.

Additionally, other highly personalized programs include special education and mental health support, as well as peer and professional mentorship to help students develop life skills for self-care, advocacy and independence. This includes managing anxiety, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, building meaningful relationships, time management, executive functioning, personal safety, job skills and more.

At the time of registration, students must be between the ages of 16 and 30 with low to moderate support needs and must demonstrate primarily independent self-care skills. Students should also possess intermediate or higher level musical skills on one or more instruments, including voice, percussion, strings, guitar, and piano/keyboard.

Students take advantage of technology.jpg

Southwest Florida Music Education Center

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Amaya Moher uses technology to develop her talents.

For more information or to offer your support for this project, contact Jennifer Clark at JenC@SWFLmusic.org, call 239-205-8258, or visit SWFLmusic.org.

GUESTS

  • Rob Moher, Founder and Chairman of the Board of Southwest Florida Music Education Center
  • Dr. Rhoda Bernard, Founding Executive Director of the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs
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Dayton Public Schools Superintendent Recognized for Supporting Music Education – WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio https://russjohnsonmusic.com/dayton-public-schools-superintendent-recognized-for-supporting-music-education-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/dayton-public-schools-superintendent-recognized-for-supporting-music-education-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ DAYTON — Dayton Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has received the Save The Music Foundation Award for her outstanding support of music education. The award recognizes a national school district superintendent or superintendent who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to restoring music education in their school district. In a statement, Lolli said she was honored that the […]]]>

DAYTON — Dayton Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has received the Save The Music Foundation Award for her outstanding support of music education.

The award recognizes a national school district superintendent or superintendent who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to restoring music education in their school district.

In a statement, Lolli said she was honored that the district’s efforts were recognized.

“Giving students the opportunity to actively play instruments, sing, and participate in other aspects of music education is truly invaluable to their overall success,” Lolli said in a statement.

>>Richmond Police Department is asking the community to help raise funds to buy a new K9

In 2019, Save the Music and Dayton Public Schools partnered to launch a district-wide music education program.

“Superintendent Lolli has been a champion of music education for all students in Dayton,” said Jaclyn Rudderow, senior director of school programs for Save The Music Foundation, in a statement.

In the three districts where Lolli previously worked, she also increased funding and support for band, choir, general music programs and professional staff development, according to a statement.

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Music Education students have the fourth highest course load https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-students-have-the-fourth-highest-course-load/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 14:33:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-students-have-the-fourth-highest-course-load/ Music Education students take the fourth highest course load at BYU with 93 credit hours and graduate with music and teaching expertise. The music education major gives students a license to teach music in the K-12 classroom. There are four different accents offered at BYU: choir, general music, strings and orchestra. Victoria Dixon and Nathan […]]]>

Music Education students take the fourth highest course load at BYU with 93 credit hours and graduate with music and teaching expertise.

The music education major gives students a license to teach music in the K-12 classroom. There are four different accents offered at BYU: choir, general music, strings and orchestra.

Victoria Dixon and Nathan Seamons celebrate at the end of BYU Wind Symphony’s 2021 Fall Semester Concert on December 9, 2021. Seamons is the Symphony Band’s conductor and a faculty member of the Education Instrumental Ensemble musical. (Photo courtesy of Victoria Dixon)

“I think the most fundamental way to understand this is really that there are two majors involved in this major. You have to be an expert in music and you have to be an expert in teaching,” said music education teacher Paul Broomhead.

Broomhead said his class MUSIC 176: Careers in Music Education is designed to provide a clear picture of what a career in music education is really about. Students use this course to “assess their compatibility with the profession” and determine whether to apply. The class also helps students with the application process.

“Those who decide to apply, I give them a bit of coaching on how to be successful in the application process,” Broomhead said.

According to Broomhead, applying music education is a rigorous process. The app focuses on five areas: Teaching Personality, Musicality, Academics, Teaching Experience, and Leadership Experience.

Students must submit a 10-minute video of themselves teaching four people a musical concept and a video of them playing their main instrument. They must also audition for the studio of their choice. The school then reviews GPA and asks students to write an 800-1000 word essay about their motivation to participate in the music education program. Finally, students must also pass an interview with the faculty.

“We’re really serious about this,” Broomhead said. “We are prepared to invest a lot of time in each candidate in order to know this person as well as possible before deciding whether or not they are admitted to our program.”

The trumpet section of the symphony group celebrates during their end-of-semester concert, “BYU Wind Symphony: Winter Celebration.” Music Education students must audition and be part of the studio of their choice. (Photo courtesy of Victoria Dixon)

Once admitted to the program, music education students share lessons with music performance and education students. They are also required to learn all of the instruments under their teaching umbrella as well as some of the other accents.

“There are a lot of things I need to learn to get this degree,”Victoria Dixon, a BYU junior with an instrumental accent, said. “If BYU took away a required class, they would take away the teaching skills I would need. Although the credits are few, they are very rewarding and it is very useful to have so many.

Spencer Baldwin, a BYU sophomore in choral emphasis, knew he wanted to be a choir teacher since he was in junior high where he participated in orchestra, choir and theater. Although he already has a year under his belt, Baldwin said he will be at BYU for another four years.

“There’s so much to do,” Baldwin said. He said the fun thing about being a music student is you’ll have a classical singing lesson with an expectation of nine hours of practice and a 45 minute lesson, but that only counts as a 1 lesson. .5 credit.

Many courses in the Music Education major are one-credit courses, but require in-class and out-of-class practice time. Baldwin said it can sometimes be difficult to manage all the homework and exercises he has to do throughout the week, but he understands that’s how it is.

Dixon hopes people know how long music teachers have to put in, the time they spend and the dedication it takes. She understands that her major has a bad reputation for being a failing for those “afraid to be an artist” or those who “won’t make money.” For her, however, it is not like that at all.

“Everyone I know in the music education program is there because they love it and because they want to help people and serve people,” Dixon said.

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Long-time Fairfield resident to lead new music education program at the University of the Sacred Heart https://russjohnsonmusic.com/long-time-fairfield-resident-to-lead-new-music-education-program-at-the-university-of-the-sacred-heart/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 23:22:46 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/long-time-fairfield-resident-to-lead-new-music-education-program-at-the-university-of-the-sacred-heart/ FAIRFIELD – The new music education program at the University of the Sacred Heart aims to create a vibrant community of forward-thinking teachers, its director said. Frank Martignetti was recently appointed assistant professor and director of SHU’s new music education program, according to the university. The 42-credit graduate program will begin this summer and the […]]]>

FAIRFIELD – The new music education program at the University of the Sacred Heart aims to create a vibrant community of forward-thinking teachers, its director said.

Frank Martignetti was recently appointed assistant professor and director of SHU’s new music education program, according to the university. The 42-credit graduate program will begin this summer and the undergraduate program will begin in the fall.

Martignetti said the folks at Sacred Heart have wanted to create a major in music for years – both students and faculty. The university has finally succeeded and is investing resources in it. He said he was given a big brushstroke to create a dream program and then hired to lead it.


“I’m really proud of what we’re building here,” he said. “I hope it will host a dynamic cohort of very high quality students, both at the masters and undergraduate level. I hope he has successful teaching students across the North East and that he has a reputation for being truly forward thinking and progressive.

He said he was now working on recruiting, facilities, equipment and personnel for it.

Martignetti, a Fairfield resident from New Rochelle, NY, said he spent 28 years teaching and playing music. He sang in church and school choral groups throughout his life and began working professionally as a church organist and choir director, as well as a music director for community theater productions.

During his career, Martignetti continued in music education – teaching high school students in New Haven. He then headed the music education program at Bridgeport University for nine years and eventually headed the entire music and performing arts department.

SHU’s master’s program in music education lasts one and a half years, while the undergraduate to master’s music program will take five years.

“Our MAT program is for people who have a degree in the field, and who often have significant work experience in the discipline, and now they want to teach it,” he said.

Martignetti said the program is similar to the previous program he oversaw and revitalized at the University of Bridgeport.

“The good thing is that the graduate students who participate in the program are between 22 years old – barely out of undergraduate studies – to 40 or 50 years old,” he said. “It’s a cool mix of adult learners. “

Martignetti said he was not sure how many people would enroll in the graduate program this summer, adding “you are at the point where you have started a new business and you are waiting for the phone to ring.”

He said he wanted the cohort to be small enough that he could give students individual attention, while still being large enough that they could network and learn from each other.

“It’s not supposed to be a huge program, but we don’t want to limit its growth potential either,” he said. “It’s just a strong cohort.”

Adult learners have unique strengths and weaknesses, Martignetti said, so they need individual attention. The teaching certification is broad, covering Kindergarten to Grade 12 and subjects in general music, choir, band, orchestra, technology, and music theory – as well as the wide variety of music. instruments.

“No one can teach all of these things well,” he said. “So it’s about helping students build on those strengths, sharpen their weaknesses, and learn new skills so that they have a few areas where they can be effective. “

Martignetti said there are several post-baccalaureate teacher preparation programs in Connecticut, but the only master’s programs in music education are at Sacred Heart University and Bridgeport University. He said his former students are doing well in the workforce.

“Everyone works,” he says. “Most teaching positions are available in the summer, and a few around Christmas. But, the job market looks pretty good. Unfortunately, some people withdraw from education because they are afraid of contracting COVID. “

Martignetti said there were 18 music teacher positions open in the state on Tuesday – a higher number than normal.

Another aspect of this program will be the relationship the university and its students have with the public schools in Bridgeport, Martignetti said. He said he held workshops with music teachers from Bridgeport and other professional development activities while at BU, and helped the district in other ways. He wants to build this relationship while also managing the SHU program.

“We’re trying to create a unique opportunity where just like the rest of the education programs here, they have the opportunity to enter this teacher’s residence in Bridgeport – where they work with a really good teacher at the schools in Bridgeport. “, did he declare. .

The student would co-teach with this teacher for the entire school year, Martignetti, and then Bridgeport would offer them a job if the graduate agreed to work there for at least three years.

“We want our students to teach in a variety of contexts to find the right context for them,” he said. “We want them to know how to teach all students successfully and well. Creating a good musical program in a neighborhood where the resources are not so good … is a great result.

joshua.labella@hearstmediact.com

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A game changer for music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 00:22:42 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ [ad_1] Reading time: 4 minutes The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional […]]]>


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Reading time: 4 minutes

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional musicians, but will also lead to better academic performance and student well-being.

Through Amadeus’ Music Education Program, 33,000 students in Sydney’s 150 Catholic schools will benefit from a quality music education, including learning to play a musical instrument by early 2024.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said the program builds on the great tradition of music education in Catholic education, with benefits extending far beyond the curriculum. music itself.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus. “

“There is a strong correlation between excellent musical progress in schools and better academic performance in reading, writing, arithmetic and analytical skills. So this was a time when we could put it all together and create a huge opportunity for all the students in our system, ”he said.

The program offers students in-class music lessons, ensemble lessons and small group lessons and will be led by more than 80 classroom music teachers and 270 specialist music teachers.

Tutors bring with them professional experience of orchestras and ensembles across Australia and the world, with strong program support from the Sydney Youth Orchestra, Sydney Conservatory of Music and Opera Australia. .

Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre” width=”808″ height=”488″ srcset=”https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4.jpg 808w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-300×181.jpg 300w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-768×464.jpg 768w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-696×420.jpg 696w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-695×420.jpg 695w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-600×362.jpg 600w” sizes=”(max-width: 808px) 100vw, 808px”/>
Students of the Amadeus Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large,” said Opera Australia Artistic Director Lyndon Terracini.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus.”

The program started with a successful pilot project involving 13 schools in the Auburn-Lakemba network.

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case, and even show up for the tutorials on time.

One of the schools involved, Holy Spirit College mixed secondary school in Lakemba, said it was already reaping the rewards.

Principal Phillip Scollard said this has helped to dramatically expand access to music education for students from all socio-economic backgrounds.

“With our 7 years, even though it’s been up for a year, we can see that it really helps them engage in their learning more effectively, including better focus. Music is not a cheap business and therefore a program like this is also a real social leveler, ”he said.

Grade 7 student Elyssia Deeb started playing the transverse flute and said she had benefited greatly from the Amadeus program.

“It also helped me improve my memory because I have to remember all the notes. It gives everyone the opportunity to play musical instruments that we might not have otherwise been able to access. It’s a wonderful program and we get constant support and guidance from our music teachers, ”she said.

His classmate John-Paul Sukkar also had a very positive experience learning to play the viola.

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large. “

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case and even show up for the tutorials on time, ”he said.

The Creative and Performing Arts Coordinator at Holy Spirit College Ms Emma Hughes said the Amadeus program is starting to unlock many previously untapped musical talents among students.

“They never had the experience of playing the flute or the cello or anything and some students never even knew these instruments existed,” she explained.

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program.  Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools
The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

“So it has been very exciting to unlock these abilities that you would never have known existed without this program.”

Head of St John Vianney Elementary School in Greenacre, Mr. Justin Coupland said classes in the program had moved online during the recent lockdown, but face-to-face tutoring would resume soon.

“COVID embarrassed a bit, which made face-to-face teaching quite difficult, but tutors continued to post online through Google Classroom,” he said.

“As our grade 3 students start and enter high school, we’ll see the music programs evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary school, but particularly in high schools…”

Thanks to the program, students in grades 3 to 8 will have access to 52,000 different instruments by 2024 and in-class music lessons will begin in kindergarten.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said it would have many long-term benefits.

“As we have our grade 3 students starting and entering high school, we will see the music curricula evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary, but especially in high schools, we will have students who have benefited from four years of practice, working in ensembles and bands which will then enter our high schools with real confidence and will greatly contribute to the music programs of our schools, ”he added.

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Big Noise music education program hailed as a success in Dundee https://russjohnsonmusic.com/big-noise-music-education-program-hailed-as-a-success-in-dundee/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 10:39:01 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/big-noise-music-education-program-hailed-as-a-success-in-dundee/ [ad_1] A music education program aimed at underprivileged communities across Scotland is having “very positive impacts” on children in Dundee, according to a new study. Big Noise Douglas was launched by Sistema Scotland in the city’s Douglas quarter in 2017 and enables young people to take music lessons while building their self-confidence and communication skills. […]]]>


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A music education program aimed at underprivileged communities across Scotland is having “very positive impacts” on children in Dundee, according to a new study.

Big Noise Douglas was launched by Sistema Scotland in the city’s Douglas quarter in 2017 and enables young people to take music lessons while building their self-confidence and communication skills.

A team of academics from the University of Dundee assessed the impact of the program during its early years, interviewing parents, children and school staff.

They concluded that the program not only helped young people from unprivileged backgrounds learn music, but also made them healthier and more complete individuals.



The study found that children’s communication skills improved significantly during Big Noise sessions.

Professor Divya Jindal-Snape, who led the study, said: “Our participants reported that the positive impact of Big Noise Douglas was due to the fact that children had the opportunity to learn music and to enjoy themselves. express in a fun and safe environment.

“The project gave the children access to resources they don’t have at home as well as the chance to be part of a group.

“The children felt a positive impact when they received nutritious food and formed valuable relationships with the staff at Big Noise Douglas.

“We would like to thank the children, parents, school professionals and staff at Big Noise Douglas for their participation in the assessment despite the continued disruption due to Covid-19. “

Approximately 250 P1-P3 children and 92 P3-P6 children from Douglas’ St Pius X RC and Claypotts Castle Primary Schools participate in Big Noise. A Baby Noise group is also lively with preschoolers.

The choice of Douglas as one of Dundee’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods was deliberate. Almost nine in ten people in the district live in areas considered to be among the poorest in all of Scotland.

Other Big Noise projects are taking place in very disadvantaged areas such as Torry in Aberdeen and Govanhill in Glasgow.

According to research, children who participated in Big Noise Douglas were better able to listen, focus, work with others, and build positive relationships.

The program was also praised for the way it adjusted during the lockdown, including hosting one-on-one music lesson sessions – often a child’s only activity outside the home during the months. first days of the pandemic.



Researchers obtained children's feedback by asking them to draw comics
Researchers obtained children’s feedback by asking them to draw comics

The researchers recommended that the Big Noise program in Douglas be extended to high schools in the area.

Paul Clancy, the outgoing boss of child and family services at Dundee City Council, called the project “very important”.

And Benny Higgins, president of Sistema Scotland, is “delighted” with the university’s findings.

He added, “Participating in Big Noise helps participants develop the attributes necessary to become happy and healthy adults, such as self-confidence, social skills and self-esteem.

“We are delighted to build on this achievement and to work closely with the local community and Dundee City Council to continue our work to help more children and youth realize their potential. “

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Rachel Dallas, grandparent of some of the kids attending Big Noise, said, “It’s not just about learning to play an instrument, it’s about coming together.

“They can see their friends, play games and have healthy snacks.

“Big Noise is so good for them – and it’s good for their mental health, too.”



Researchers say the program should be extended to older children as well
Researchers say the program should be extended to older children as well

Sistema was persuaded to bring Big Noise to Dundee through the Optimistic Sound Campaign, founded to honor the aspiration of famed Dundee singer-songwriter Michael Marra to provide a musical education to disadvantaged children in the city.

Campaign Chairman Urban Gaming Guru Chris van der Kuyl said: “Since opening in 2017, Big Noise Douglas has grown steadily, positively impacting young people and families in the local community.

“Optimistic Sound is delighted to have been instrumental in campaigning and fundraising to bring this work to Dundee.

“We are delighted to have played our part in helping children and young people benefit from this meaningful work.”

Jenny Marra, former Labor MP and niece of the late singer, said on Twitter: “Brilliant work at #Dundee by @sistemascotland hand in hand with kids in Douglas.

“Well done to all the kids and staff and thank you to @DundeeCouncil #partenariat. Reach for the stars! “

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School of Rock’s Unique Music Education Brand Comes to Grand Rapids https://russjohnsonmusic.com/school-of-rocks-unique-music-education-brand-comes-to-grand-rapids/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/school-of-rocks-unique-music-education-brand-comes-to-grand-rapids/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 21:28:35 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/school-of-rocks-unique-music-education-brand-comes-to-grand-rapids/ [ad_1] GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan – In just a few months there will be a new option not only for learning a new musical instrument, but also for learning how to rock. The Rock Grand Rapids School is scheduled to open near Breton Village, on the southeast side of Grand Rapids, in late December. Gwen Bultema […]]]>


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GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan – In just a few months there will be a new option not only for learning a new musical instrument, but also for learning how to rock.

The Rock Grand Rapids School is scheduled to open near Breton Village, on the southeast side of Grand Rapids, in late December.

Gwen Bultema and her husband decided to turn to the School of Rock franchise network earlier this year. It has been quite a process to get to where they are now, but there is already the shape of a huge guitar taking shape outside their building.

“It’s not a musical venue, but we kind of wanted to give that impression to the students,” Bultema said on Friday.

“We wanted to be able to sort of create not only a music education program, but also a place where people can relax and feel at home. “

The installation does not see much like your typical music store where lessons traditionally take place, and it works in a format meant to keep students excited about what they’re doing and engaged with the skills they’re learning together.

RELATED: Couple Promote Heart Health Education Through Music

“Our foundational course would be a one-on-one course with an instructor, and then later in the week you would do a performance-based group course,” Bultema said.

“This is where you have someone on drums and bass and vocals, and you learn together and you sing songs. “

Eventually, student musical groups will even have the chance to perform in local concert halls in the region.

“We’re really looking forward to cultivating relationships with local venues and having our kids open for some of the groups coming to town,” Bultema said.

The program is aimed at children, adolescents and young adults, but all ages are welcome. School of Rock specializes in working with students of all skill levels.

Although they have already hired several key staff before the opening, they are still looking for around 10 to 15 additional employees. You can apply for a position HERE.

You can find out about all the programs they offer and request information for your future music student. HERE.

RELATED: Piano Teacher Gives Lessons on Her Porch During Pandemic

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Bradford Band Donates $ 9,000 to School Board for Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bradford-band-donates-9000-to-school-board-for-music-education/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bradford-band-donates-9000-to-school-board-for-music-education/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 18:45:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bradford-band-donates-9000-to-school-board-for-music-education/ [ad_1] The Simcoe County District School Board Music Education Program received a boost of $ 9,000 last weekend from Bradford’s band, Ninth Line. The Simcoe County District School Board Music Education Program received a boost of $ 9,000 last weekend from Bradford cover band Ninth Line. Formed in the 1980s at Bradford District High School […]]]>


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The Simcoe County District School Board Music Education Program received a boost of $ 9,000 last weekend from Bradford’s band, Ninth Line.

The Simcoe County District School Board Music Education Program received a boost of $ 9,000 last weekend from Bradford cover band Ninth Line.

Formed in the 1980s at Bradford District High School (BDHS), named after one of the town’s rural roads, the group returned to their hometown to donate to the school board while performing at its first performance since the start of the pandemic at the city’s annual Pumpkin Fest at Henderson Park.

“Ninth Line is where we rehearsed,” said band frontman Jimmy Skerratt. “This is where we made all our noise when we were younger.”

The band – Skerratt, Michael Jack, Joe Brett, Matthew Certosimo and new drummer John Lord – have come together in recent years to perform covers of 1980s rock ‘n’ roll, pop and blues classics. Their original drummer, Peter “Woody” Woodhead, sadly passed away earlier last year.

The group were joined by Holly Reynolds, head of the school board’s music program, Bonnie Black and Bradford District High School (BDHS), and Superintendent Chris Samis for a special check discount on Saturday afternoon.

Through the group’s charity, the Ninth Line Foundation, they donated $ 9,000 to the board of directors so they could purchase software and licenses for remote music lessons during the pandemic. The group also announced their Ninth Line Music Fellowship through the Ninth Line Foundation at BDHS, which was first awarded to a student entering a college music program.

“We always felt great in high school,” Skerratt said. “Music education has always been important to us, and it got us thinking about how we might give back.”

It took about three years for the band to collect money from the funds raised through concerts and merchandise sales.

In the past, the group has used their music to support school programs, purchasing musical instruments to donate to schools and providing scholarships to young people pursuing music studies, through the Ninth Line Foundation.

“The Ninth Line Foundation’s donations to SCDSB have been made possible by all of our friends and family who have attended the band’s concerts and purchased our ‘merch’ since our reunion in 2016, as well as the generous support of Scotto Electric, Bradford Print Shoppe and Borden Ladner Gervaus srl. “

As the restrictions related to the pandemic begin to ease, the band hope to continue performing and further supporting music education at SCDSB and across the country.

“Music isn’t much money anymore and concerts are scarce, we take it where we can,” Skerratt said. “We miss being in front of people. We all appreciate that.”

To learn more about the group and its foundation, visit their Facebook page here.

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Pfeiffer brings back bands, music education – The Stanly News & Press https://russjohnsonmusic.com/pfeiffer-brings-back-bands-music-education-the-stanly-news-press/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/pfeiffer-brings-back-bands-music-education-the-stanly-news-press/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 17:55:10 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/pfeiffer-brings-back-bands-music-education-the-stanly-news-press/ [ad_1] At the end of August, the new Pfeiffer University Wind & Percussion Ensemble began rehearsing every Monday evening for a concert on November 2 in the Henry Pfeiffer Chapel. The formation of the group is one of the many steps that Dr Joseph Earp, its director, is taking to restore the major in music […]]]>


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At the end of August, the new Pfeiffer University Wind & Percussion Ensemble began rehearsing every Monday evening for a concert on November 2 in the Henry Pfeiffer Chapel. The formation of the group is one of the many steps that Dr Joseph Earp, its director, is taking to restore the major in music education to Pfeiffer from the fall of 2022.

“Any honors program in music education requires its students to perform in instrumental and choral ensembles,” Earp said. “Thus, the Wind & Percussion Ensemble is vital to the prospects for success of the music education program, as are the Pfeiffer choral ensembles, which are already thriving under the able leadership of Joe Judge (class of 1987). I want people to see that Pfeiffer’s bands are the real deal. We’re going to do something about it.

By “bands,” Earp also meant Freddie Falcon’s House Band, a dynamic band who have also started rehearsing for their debut, which will take place at a Pfeiffer basketball game this winter. He will perform the University’s first fight song, for which Earp, also a prolific songwriter, writes the music and lyrics.

Earp, a trombonist with a PhD in Music Education from Liberty University, is interested in enrolling 10 majors in Music Education at Pfeiffer for the 2022-2023 academic year. In four years, if all goes according to plan, that number would increase to around 25 or 30.

The Wind & Percussion Ensemble would grow from its current 13 members to between 35 and 50 members. Like Mila Rutter (class of 2023), a junior environmental science major from Gold Hill, many of the players in the group won’t be majoring in music education or music. Instead, they will continue to practice music as a serious hobby, which would be consistent with a culture that encourages Pfeiffer students to participate in several extracurricular activities.

“I still want to play the trumpet and I want to learn how to play the drums,” said Rutter, who has performed in the East Rowan High School March and Jazz Orchestras. “I don’t intend to specialize in music, but I want to keep playing as long as possible. So the Wind & Percussion Ensemble was great for me.

Earp’s recruitment strategy will build on his successful experiences during his pre-Pfeiffer days as a builder of instrumental music programs, first at Cox Mill High School in Concord (2009-2017) then at Limestone. University in Gaffney, South Carolina (2017-2021). He will highlight the benefits of Pfeiffer’s culture when it comes to music education: “One of the special things about Pfeiffer is this little school experience. When you walk into an orchestra hall, for example, I’ll know more than your name. I’ll ask you how your classes are going and I’ll help motivate you to get things done for your classes.

Earp is a first generation student and his doctoral dissertation focused on the experiences of first generation students in an undergraduate music education program. Thus, he gets along particularly well with future first-generation university students who plan to follow in his footsteps in music education.

Earp will showcase his talents as a conductor as a guest assistant during rehearsals for the high school groups he visits. This could mean leading a section of a group or criticizing the balances and other delicate points of the whole. This way, future students will get a good idea of ​​Earp as a teacher / conductor.

Earp wants to attract potential students to the Misenheimer campus in Pfeiffer. One way to do this already exists: it recruits ensemble members from local community colleges and already has seven who have joined the group. Another way, which was also tried with success during Earp’s stay in Limestone, will be to bring together the best high school musicians in the area in an honorary band that rehearses and performs in Pfeiffer under the direction of a leading clinician.

“The likelihood of them dating Pfeiffer increases dramatically if you can get them on campus,” he said.

Finally, Earp works with other faculty and administrators to make the university’s music facilities more attractive to future music education graduates who visit his Misenheimer campus. One of the main priorities is to enlarge the stage in the Henry Pfeiffer Chapel, where the ensemble will perform, as it is too small for a concert orchestra. Another priority is to attenuate the too bright acoustics of the chapel with acoustic panels.

Pfeiffer’s new music education majors are said to be the first to graduate from college since the spring of 2014, four years after the phasing out of the music education major began (Pfeiffer’s board of directors approved the return major in music education at a meeting in June). They would leave college both as generalists capable of doing “any kind of work” in K-12 music and as specialists revolving around one of three areas of music: instrumental, choral or elementary.

Earp is quite optimistic about the employment opportunities for these graduates, noting that some parts of the region will need music teachers as new schools are being built to cope with the growing population. He also points out that there is always a certain turnover in teaching.

“There are a lot of jobs available and available,” he said. “I look forward to helping launch the careers of the next generation of Pfeiffer-trained music teachers. “

Want to go?

What: Under the direction of Joseph Earp, the Pfeiffer University Wind & Percussion Ensemble will present their “Autumn Concert”. The program will include the first Pfeiffer from Earp’s “Hatsuhi Sunrise” for percussion ensemble, with the ensemble as percussionists. Also presented will be “Sing Gently” by Eric Whitacre (transcribed from a choir for instrumental ensemble, by Verena Mosenbichler-Bryant), “Deus Ex Machina” by Randall Standridge, “At Morning’s Light” by David R. Gillingham and “Declaration Overture” by Claude T. Smith. “

When: 7 p.m. on November 2

Where: Henry Pfeiffer Chapel on the Misenheimer Campus of Pfeiffer University

Price: free and open to the public

Ken Keuffel, author of this article, has been Pfeiffer’s Deputy Director of Communications since December 2019. He welcomes article ideas from professors, staff, students, alumni and friends of Pfeiffer. The form for submitting story ideas is at www.pfeiffer.edu/newsform.

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