learn play – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png learn play – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Santa Maria-Bonita Receives $3.6 Million Gift for Music Education in the Form of Apple Stock | Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-maria-bonita-receives-3-6-million-gift-for-music-education-in-the-form-of-apple-stock-education/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 03:30:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-maria-bonita-receives-3-6-million-gift-for-music-education-in-the-form-of-apple-stock-education/ The Santa Maria-Bonita School District will be able to increase local K-8 students’ access to musical instruments with an unprecedented donation of nearly $3.6 million given in memory of the local music lover Elizabeth Anne Brooks. The funds were provided by the Brooks Family Trust in the form of 20,818 shares of Apple – each […]]]>

The Santa Maria-Bonita School District will be able to increase local K-8 students’ access to musical instruments with an unprecedented donation of nearly $3.6 million given in memory of the local music lover Elizabeth Anne Brooks.

The funds were provided by the Brooks Family Trust in the form of 20,818 shares of Apple – each valued at $172.79 as of Tuesday – and formally accepted by the district board of directors at their meeting on 9 February.

The Brooks family has requested that the funds be used exclusively for the purpose of encouraging children to learn to play a musical instrument and continue long enough to become proficient, by making instruments available for rental to any student from Santa Maria enrolled in a public school music class. .

Acting Superintendent Matthew Beecher said the district will cash in the shares as soon as they have access to deposit them into the new Elizabeth A. Brooks Music Fund.

“We’re very excited about this and what it means in the long term for our children and their access to instrumental music,” Beecher told the district council.

Brooks, who died in 2012 at the age of 44, was known for her love of the flute as well as other instruments like the piano. She performed in the Junior National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, DC, and studied flute at Stony Brook State University in New York and the Suzuki Institute of Music in Japan.

Upon arriving in Santa Maria in 2004, she became a member of the Allan Hancock College Concert Band and the Christ United Methodist Church Choir, and was also known to have attended the Battle of the Bands competition at Ethel Auditorium. Pope of Santa Maria High School.

“It was his enjoyment of these performances that led his parents, Martha and Norman Brooks, to honor his memory by directing these resources to support the instrumental music program in the Santa Maria-Bonita School District,” Beecher said.

Board members marveled at the size of the donation for a public school district like theirs.

“This is probably the most gracious and grandest gift I’ve seen of this nature in a public setting like ours – we’re not a university, we don’t have deep-pocketed alumni or anything like that, so the generosity is just amazing,” said board member John Hollinshead.

Upon access to the shares, the district will immediately open an investment account with Fidelity Investments to execute the sale. Proceeds from the sale will then be placed in the Elizabeth A. Brooks Music Fund under the direction of the Santa Barbara County Treasurer.

Funds can also be used to provide access to musical instruments for students around Santa Maria, such as Orcutt.

Board member Ricardo Valencia noted that improving access to musical instruments for elementary students will also greatly benefit the Santa Maria Joint Union School District, where there is already a strong music program. with talented students.

“Now imagine what the possibilities will be for our young people when they get these resources at an even earlier stage in their lives. I get chills just thinking about it” Valencia said.

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Musicians raise funds to support music education for young people https://russjohnsonmusic.com/musicians-raise-funds-to-support-music-education-for-young-people/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 05:37:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/musicians-raise-funds-to-support-music-education-for-young-people/ ASHLAND, WI. (KBJR) – On a snowy Saturday in Ashland, Wis., people gathered at the Stagecoach Bar and Grill for an annual tradition. “We have the Snojam Music Festival and a fundraiser. It’s not the first year, but it’s the first year that Stagecoach Bar and Grill has taken over,” said Chelsea Anderson, Stagecoach Bar […]]]>

ASHLAND, WI. (KBJR) – On a snowy Saturday in Ashland, Wis., people gathered at the Stagecoach Bar and Grill for an annual tradition.

“We have the Snojam Music Festival and a fundraiser. It’s not the first year, but it’s the first year that Stagecoach Bar and Grill has taken over,” said Chelsea Anderson, Stagecoach Bar and Grill Events Coordinator and Promoter.

The Snojam featured local musicians playing different musical styles and a variety of instruments.

According to Native American Pied Piper Laughing Fox, he learned to play his flute in nature’s classroom.

“I went out and sat in the woods and played a note, and that note affected me so much,” Laughing Fox said.

Snojam has also served as a fundraiser to help today’s native youth embark on their musical journey. Organizers are raising money to send local kids to the Native Girls Rock Camp.

“A week where they can stay and learn to play in a band or learn an instrument. It’s so cool,” Anderson said.

Local businesses donated items for silent auctions, and festival-goers could purchase a commemorative t-shirt with proceeds going to the cause.

Organizers say their goal is to raise $1,000 to $2,000, but some of the Snowjam Festival rewards go beyond money.

“Here, we love music. We’re trying to kickstart the music scene in Ashland, so it made sense for us to partner up and elevate as we climbed,” Anderson said.

Organizers said that in addition to teaching music, the Indigenous Girls Rock Camp also teaches classes on building self-esteem and leadership.

The camp is made possible by a non-profit organization called The Spirit of a Woman.

For more information on their mission, click here.

Copyright 2022 CBS 3 Duluth. All rights reserved.

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Santa Barbara Education Foundation, 99.9 KTYD Instrumental in Local Music Education | School zone https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 18:05:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Posted on February 1, 2022 | 10:05 a.m. Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments. The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a […]]]>

Posted on February 1, 2022
| 10:05 a.m.

Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments.

The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a rarity for California school districts.

In recent years, SBEF staff and local music education advocates have taken to the airwaves on 99.9 KTYD to ask for community support.

During last year’s Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, SBEF provided $30,000 in funding and 60 donated instruments, including Indian string instruments, accordions, cellos and a piccolo that will go straight into the hands students in SB Unified music programs.

With so much hanging around the annual event, SBEF will once again join 99.9 KTYD for the entire month of February for the Keep the Beat Instrument Drive. The on-air event will serve as an outreach and celebration for SB Unified student musicians.

“We are always amazed at how our community comes together to support students with the gift of music,” said SBEF Executive Director Margie Yahyavi. “This is a huge victory for our students.

“In addition to the problem-solving and cooperative learning skills gained from playing music, having a creative outlet can be a huge benefit for a child, especially during this difficult time,”

The month-long radio event will feature SB Unified music teachers and local professional musicians taking to the airwaves to rally community support for music education at local public schools.

This year’s guests include George Pendergast of Dishwalla, Dylan Aguilera, music and band director of Santa Barbara High School, and Rick Boller of the Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation.

SBEF will also host a contactless instrument donation site from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday in February at its offices, 1330 State St. Instrument donations are also accepted at Nick Rail Music at 2801 De La Vina Street.

Do you have an instrument that collects dust? Donate your used instruments to put them directly into the hands of a student through a local school music program.

For more information about Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, visit keepthebeatsb.org or call 805-284-9125.

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Interview with music composer Green Knight Daniel Hart [WATCH] https://russjohnsonmusic.com/interview-with-music-composer-green-knight-daniel-hart-watch/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 23:00:29 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/interview-with-music-composer-green-knight-daniel-hart-watch/ “I did more research for this movie than any movie I’ve ever worked on,” says ‘The Green Knight’ composer Daniel Hart on Writing Music for Medieval Fantasy on Sir Gawain (Dev Patel) and his quest to find the main character as part of a deadly game. He had never written music for this genre before, […]]]>

“I did more research for this movie than any movie I’ve ever worked on,” says ‘The Green Knight’ composer Daniel Hart on Writing Music for Medieval Fantasy on Sir Gawain (Dev Patel) and his quest to find the main character as part of a deadly game. He had never written music for this genre before, so he thought, “It’s going to be an adventure. And I felt like it needed to feel musically authentic in some ways. Watch our exclusive video interview with Hart above.

Preparing for ‘The Green Knight’ involved “researching instruments and musical styles from the 15th century…and on top of that I wrote a lot of Middle English lyrics.” Hart intended these lyrics to sound like the original poem, which was written in the 14th century, “so I read a lot of Middle English poetry and listened to people recite Middle English poetry… Because often when I I was writing lyrics, it was the sound of a word that appealed to me as much as the meaning of the word itself.

“The Green Knight” was written and directed by David Bassey. Hart composed the scores for all of Lowery’s feature films, which ranged in style from “The Old Man and the Gun” to Disney’s “Pete’s Dragon” and required equally different music. “I love being a chameleon,” he said of the variation in his compositions from film to film. “There are so many different styles of music that I’m obsessed with, and so many that I’ve been blessed to learn and then play over the years.” But there is a common element in the music because Lowery’s films all explore “the fragility of existence, the vulnerability of what it is to be human and to be alive”.

Now, Hart finds himself on the Oscar list for Best Original Score, a first for the composer. “‘What?’ That was my reaction, I think. And then after that, “Awesome,” he says of being surprised at the good news. He admits it’s “intimidating” to be among “a lot of very great music by a lot of great composers”. But creating this score was “like being a kid in a candy store. All the things that I wanted to do to create the sounds for this movie, I have to do.

Make your Gold Derby predictions now. Download our free and easy app for Apple/iPhone or Android (Google Play) devices to compete against legions of other fans as well as our experts and editors for the highest prediction accuracy scores. Check out our latest betting champions. Can you then top our estimated rankings? Always remember to keep your predictions up to date as they impact our latest racetrack odds, which are terrifying chefs and Hollywood stars. Don’t miss the fun. Speak out and share your opinions on our famous forums where 5,000 showbiz leaders hide out every day to follow the latest awards rumours. Everyone wants to know: what do you think? Who do you predict and why?

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Savannah Music Stores Aim To Give Students A Quality Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:25:55 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ [ad_1] Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat. It often starts with […]]]>


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Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat.

It often starts with that decision in elementary school where students have the option of choosing an after-school program, such as a band or orchestra, which often continues through high school. In this journey it is common to see the relationship and collaboration between students, group programs and music stores that champion music education.

The legacy of Portman’s Music Superstore

Portman Music Superstore, a longtime Savannah staple, has an intimate relationship with group programs across the Southeast. Founded in 1936 by Ben Portman, Portman’s has been instrumental in the development of band and orchestral programs in the region. Jerry Portman, son of Ben Portman, currently owns the store and his wife Myra oversees the office. He said that prior to his and his father’s involvement in schools in the early 1950s, there were little or no band programs in the public school system and private schools in Savannah-Chatham County.

“My dad got a call from a few musical instrument companies that make instruments, and they said, ‘If we sent you horns in August, would you give them to the kids in the school marching band? beginner? And then whatever you don’t rent, send it back to us in October, and we can calculate the payment for the horns that have been rented. That’s how he officially got into the business, ”explained Jerry Portman. “He and I helped start music programs in schools that had never had music programs before. “

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

Portman’s has other locations in Albany, Augusta and Brunswick and rents instruments to thousands of students each year. They also offer full repairs and music lessons with 45 qualified instructors. They laid the groundwork for the group programs students participate in today and, at the forefront, they emphasize the importance of music education.

16-year-old Anne Ou takes piano lessons with instructor Hannah Wong at Portman's Music Superstore on Abercorn Street.

“We are proud to have done this for 85 years. We created it. We are still going strong. We are dedicated to music education. We are doing everything we can, ”said Myra Portman.

Guitar and Music & Arts Center

Students and parents alike looking for places to rent and purchase instruments don’t have to look far. On the same street as Portman’s, Abercorn is lined with two other stores that emphasize the importance of music education: Guitar Center and its subsidiary Music & Arts, the two retail chains, they claim, provide the largest selection of instruments in the United States.

The Music & Arts storefront located at 7805 Abercorn St., Suite 20A.

“Music education is what it all comes down to at the end of the day,” said Mike Marra, Retail District Manager for Music & Arts. “We can offer students the opportunity to explore a new art and give them a platform to express themselves. Music education has been proven to increase test scores and academic ability. For us to bring that into this community, that’s who we all are.

Following:2021 has been a year of resilience, innovation in Savannah’s art scene

Both stores also offer private and group musical instrument lessons with qualified instructors, rentals and repairs, contributing to the many choices available to students in acquiring a quality music education.

The Guitar Center showcase located at 7700 Abercorn St.

Guitar Center opened on the lot next to Portman’s in November 2021. Music & Arts opened across the street in April 2021; However, said Marra, prior to the physical establishment, Music & Arts had worked in partnership with directors of local bands and orchestras for more than six years, helping students choose the instruments that were best for them.

“A big part of educating and maintaining music is about getting kids interested. And we provide services that help these principals go into elementary schools and reach out and motivate these people to try and get started so that we can continue to bring music to life in schools, ”said Marra.

Music during the pandemic

Like many businesses, the pandemic has affected the operation of these music stores. Guitar Center and Music & Arts offer virtual lessons, and Portman’s installed an air purification system to make lessons safer for educators and students.

Rodney Gerido is a 52-year-old tank top who started taking guitar lessons with instructor Lee Cheek at Portman's Music Superstore in January 2021.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed operations, music education has persisted, from children to adults.

Following:Not a Record: Local Savannah Record Stores on Vinyl Sales and Popularity Increase

Jerry Portman said when people started to come back, it wasn’t the kids who came through the doors first, but more adults.

Studies have shown that music helps people get through the pandemic, which is evident in trends such as increased sales of musical vinyls since 2020 and increased sales of guitars. According to a study by Fender YouGov, nearly 16 million people have taken back the guitar since the COVID-19 pandemic.

A wall of guitars at the Savannah Guitar Center.  Will Bryant, chief executive, said there was an increase in the number of people wanting to learn to play the guitar during the pandemic.

“There was certainly a great deal of interest in people looking to buy a new instrument, whether it was a seasoned musician who has been playing drums for years, who perhaps wanted to get into the guitar.” , said Will Bryant, Managing Director of Savannah Guitar. Center. “We’ve also had a lot of people who were just looking for a hobby to take their time while they’re stuck at home. And a lot of people kind of look to the guitar for that because so many people would come and say that they wanted to learn to play guitar for years and years and years. Now that they are kind of forced to take that free time, it has given them the opportunity to follow that passion. ”

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

The stores also make an effort to supply musical instruments to other organizations in Savannah. Friends of Ben Tucker Inc., the charity honoring jazz great Ben Tucker, partners with Portman’s to provide musical instruments to underprivileged children in the Savannah area, and Music & Arts has partnered with Savannah Jazz to sponsor the 2021 festival master classes.

For a city like Savannah that is teeming with music, music stores are providing the next generation with the tools to acquire a quality music education.

“It just means the music is always popular. The groups will be there forever. School music will be here forever, ”said Myra Portman.

Laura Nwogu is the Quality of Life reporter for Savannah Morning News. Contact her at lnwogu@gannett.com. Twitter: @lauranwogu_

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Music education company Trala raises $6.9 million https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-company-trala-raises-6-9-million/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-company-trala-raises-6-9-million/ Music education app company Trala had raised $6.9 million. These are the details. Trala – a music education app allowing students to learn the violin at any age – recently announced that it has closed a new round of funding. This funding round brings Trala’s total funding to $6.9 million with participation from executives from […]]]>

  • Music education app company Trala had raised $6.9 million. These are the details.

Trala – a music education app allowing students to learn the violin at any age – recently announced that it has closed a new round of funding. This funding round brings Trala’s total funding to $6.9 million with participation from executives from Coinbase, LinkedIn, Airbnb, Apple Ads, Doordash, the Seattle Symphony and VMWare.

Over the past 3 years, Trala has been downloaded by over 400,000 people in 193 countries. And this funding round follows a groundbreaking partnership with world-renowned violinist Joshua Bell and enables Trala to continue making music education accessible to everyone on Earth.

When students download Trala, they are matched with the best violin teacher based on their age, skill level, and goals. And between online violin lessons, students work on the world’s largest library of violin videos and interactive scores. Plus, Trala’s proprietary signal processing algorithms additionally give students instant pitch and rhythm feedback every time they practice.

Backed by tech visionaries like Duolingo CEO Luis von Ahn and artists like Joshua Bell, Trala is now getting the support it needs to build the future of music education.

KEY QUOTE:

“We are building Trala because we believe everyone should have access to the gift of making music. This support shows us that the music education industry can and will evolve with the times. This new funding means we can continue to refine Trala’s curriculum and technology to enable anyone, at any age, to learn to play an instrument.

— Sam Walder, CEO and co-founder of Trala

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Music Education App Trala Provides $ 6.9 Million Funding With Support From Executives At Coinbase, LinkedIn And AirBnB | https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-app-trala-provides-6-9-million-funding-with-support-from-executives-at-coinbase-linkedin-and-airbnb/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 23:21:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-app-trala-provides-6-9-million-funding-with-support-from-executives-at-coinbase-linkedin-and-airbnb/ [ad_1] CHICAGO, December 6, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Trala, the music education app for students to learn violin at any age, has closed a new round of funding. This new investment brings the total financing of Trala to $ 6.9 million, with the participation of executives from Coinbase, LinkedIn, AirBnB, Apple Ads, Doordash, Seattle […]]]>


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CHICAGO, December 6, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Trala, the music education app for students to learn violin at any age, has closed a new round of funding. This new investment brings the total financing of Trala to $ 6.9 million, with the participation of executives from Coinbase, LinkedIn, AirBnB, Apple Ads, Doordash, Seattle Symphony and VMWare.

Over the past 3 years, Trala has been downloaded by over 400,000 people in 193 countries. This funding follows an innovative partnership with the world-renowned violinist Joshua Bell and allows Trala to continue to make music education accessible to everyone on Earth.

“We are building Trala because we believe that everyone should have access to the gift of making music,” says Sam walder, CEO and co-founder of Trala. “This support shows us that the music education industry can and will evolve over time. This new funding means we can continue to refine Trala’s curriculum and technology to enable anyone, at any age, to learn. to play an instrument. “

When students download Trala, they are matched with the best violin teacher for their age, skill level, and goals. Between online violin lessons, students work on the world’s largest library of interactive violin videos and sheet music. Trala’s proprietary signal processing algorithms further give students instant feedback on pitch and pace every time they practice. Designed for adult learners, the Trala app helps students of all ages.

Backed by tech visionaries like the CEO of Duolingo Luis von Ahn and artists like Joshua Bell, Trala receives the support necessary to build the future of music education.

About Trala: Trala is a music education app that uses technology to teach anyone, at any age, to play the violin. To get started with Trala, go to www.trala.com or search for “violin” in Google Play or App store.

Show original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/music-education-app-trala-brings-funding-to-6-9m-with-support-from-leaders-at-coinbase-linkedin-and-airbnb- 301438425.html

SOURCE Trala

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New program promotes music education for Cleveland children https://russjohnsonmusic.com/new-program-promotes-music-education-for-cleveland-children-2/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/new-program-promotes-music-education-for-cleveland-children-2/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 21:37:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/new-program-promotes-music-education-for-cleveland-children-2/ [ad_1] CLEVELAND – Kimberly Shemo is getting ready for one of her favorite times of the day. Shemo is the music program manager of the Northeast Ohio Boys and Girls Clubs. The position allows her to merge her love for children with her passion for music and entertainment. What would you like to know Some […]]]>


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CLEVELAND – Kimberly Shemo is getting ready for one of her favorite times of the day.

Shemo is the music program manager of the Northeast Ohio Boys and Girls Clubs. The position allows her to merge her love for children with her passion for music and entertainment.


What would you like to know

  • Some of Northeast Ohio’s largest musical institutions are working to make music and music education more accessible to children in Cleveland
  • Opening Track Project Brings Music Education Benefits to Boys & Girls Clubs of Northeast Ohio
  • The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and the Cleveland Orchestra offer programming for the program, giving children access to vocal and instrumental training and will be field trip destinations for on-site activities.
  • The Opening Track project was started as a pilot in the Boys & Girls clubs of Cleveland, Akron, Elyria and Sandusky. It is planned to expand to other sites in 2022.

She has been with the Boys & Girls Clubs for nine years and has been a Music Director for three months.

The position was created to help lead a new initiative called the Opening track project. It’s a program designed to incorporate music into virtually any type of activity here at Boys and Girls Clubs.

“What we want to do with Opening Track is teach you how to react holistically and when I say holistically, I mean mentally, don’t I? I mean socio and emotionally, ”Shemo said.

With the help of Shemo, children learn to play and interpret music and understand its benefits.

The lineup of music and the opening track isn’t limited to the walls of the Boys and Girls Club. Opening Track is made possible through a partnership.

Some of Northeast Ohio’s most prominent musical institutions, such as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Cleveland Orchestra, offer degree programs for the program, giving children access to vocal training. and instrumental and will be field trip destinations for on-site activities.

“It’s always good to give back, but it also shows our youth in these underserved communities that there are people and organizations that care about them,” Shemo said.

Shemo, who has a degree in music, said music education can unleash the potential and purpose of these children, just like it has for her.

“I was one of those kids at one point in my life and I was fortunate and fortunate to have adults who came and believed in me,” she said.

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It’s All In The Game: Growing A $ 50 Million Music Education Business In A Crowded Market https://russjohnsonmusic.com/its-all-in-the-game-growing-a-50-million-music-education-business-in-a-crowded-market/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/its-all-in-the-game-growing-a-50-million-music-education-business-in-a-crowded-market/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 08:48:32 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/its-all-in-the-game-growing-a-50-million-music-education-business-in-a-crowded-market/ [ad_1] Yousician co-founder Chris Thür, Yousicien If you spend time watching music content on YouTube, chances are you’ve seen at least one advertisement for the course app, Yousician. And if – at any point in your life – you’ve struggled to learn to play a musical instrument, the Finland-based company promises to facilitate progress through […]]]>


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If you spend time watching music content on YouTube, chances are you’ve seen at least one advertisement for the course app, Yousician.

And if – at any point in your life – you’ve struggled to learn to play a musical instrument, the Finland-based company promises to facilitate progress through a series of graduated lessons characterized by a technology-powered engine at listening to the user play and rewards progress with star ratings.

At this point, you may have clicked the Skip button. YouTube itself is full of music education videos – some of them ad hoc and posted by enthusiastic amateurs, others lovingly created by pros, and a few offering gateways to full lessons. Take a step back to look at the Internet at large and there is no shortage of free and premium music education. Yousician exists in a very large universe.

But over the course of a decade, the company cut the noise. Today, it has around 20 million active users – up from 14 million before the pandemic – and revenues of around $ 50 million. In April of this year, the company secured an additional $ 28 million in Series B, with True Ventures as the lead investor. The deal brings the total amount raised to $ 35 million. As it stands, the company’s main markets are in the English-speaking world – US, UK, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand – but it is rolling out local language versions as well.

From Finland to the world

So when I spoke to co-founder Chris Thür, I was eager to find out how a Finnish startup set out to increase the number of users outside of its home market.

It turned out to be a case of necessity. Gaining ground in the English-speaking world was part of the game plan from day one.

“Finland is a very small country,” he says. “It was therefore natural for us to turn to the largest markets. ”

Again, given the size of the market, it made sense to go with English as the app language. This, says Thür, was a well-established strategy. “Finnish game companies tend to launch in English to address the larger market,” he says.

The idea behind Yousicien was simple. Thür was a trained laser scientist and his co-founder Mikko Kaipainen was trained as an electrical engineer. Both had tried and failed to learn the instruments. The idea behind the platform was to provide effective music training for those who were struggling with self-study or conventional courses. “We were solving our own problem,” says Thür.

Non-musicians

Now, music education is an area dominated – unsurprisingly – by musicians. Thür admits there were a few raised eyebrows when the company was launched with outside musicians at the helm. “We spoke to an investor who asked us: Are you music teachers? Are you musicians? Are you sound engineers? Are you app developers? We said no. He didn’t write us a check. But he said it was fantastic that we brought new thinking. This is how innovation happens.

But what does innovation mean in the context of music education? Yousician started small with a kids app. Thür admits it was not popular. When it comes to their children’s education, parents weren’t willing to pay for an app. So the business has pivoted. In addition to a guitar tuning app, he began to take an interest in a wider range of learners – older groups.

“Our audience is made up of people who have tried to make an instrument their own, but it didn’t work for them,” says Thür.

Be flexible

So why does he think Yousician works? It would be easy to point out the element of gamification – now almost mandatory in educational apps – but Thür points out that over time the platform has become flexible enough to meet the musical ambitions and aspirations of different customer groups. “Some like the workouts. Some like music theory. Some like to focus on the melody. Others like chords, ”he says.

Also, a more recent development is the introduction of masterclass style sessions with musicians such as Jason Miraz and Metallica.

The development of the platform is underway. From a bare minimum at launch, its functionality increases. At the same time, the application is continuously optimized through A / B testing of functions.

The challenge for any business is of course to reach the target audience. Although based in Europe, Yousician’s English-speaking offering could easily be mistaken for an American product. At the same time, much of the advertising through YouTube on social media is directed at those whose online activity shows an interest in music education. Free lessons are available but they are basic. Thür says many people convert to the $ 10 per month premium plan in a matter of days. “It’s not a lot of money.” The challenge is to make the free offer useful enough to gain users while ensuring that it is limited enough to incentivize upgrades.

Will growth continue after the pandemic? Thür thinks so. “We were growing up anyway,” he says. “People will want to continue to use their time well. ”

And he thinks people will continue to be drawn to music. “It’s a complete workout for the brain,” he says.

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Pfeiffer brings back bands, music education – The Stanly News & Press https://russjohnsonmusic.com/pfeiffer-brings-back-bands-music-education-the-stanly-news-press/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/pfeiffer-brings-back-bands-music-education-the-stanly-news-press/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 17:55:10 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/pfeiffer-brings-back-bands-music-education-the-stanly-news-press/ [ad_1] At the end of August, the new Pfeiffer University Wind & Percussion Ensemble began rehearsing every Monday evening for a concert on November 2 in the Henry Pfeiffer Chapel. The formation of the group is one of the many steps that Dr Joseph Earp, its director, is taking to restore the major in music […]]]>


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At the end of August, the new Pfeiffer University Wind & Percussion Ensemble began rehearsing every Monday evening for a concert on November 2 in the Henry Pfeiffer Chapel. The formation of the group is one of the many steps that Dr Joseph Earp, its director, is taking to restore the major in music education to Pfeiffer from the fall of 2022.

“Any honors program in music education requires its students to perform in instrumental and choral ensembles,” Earp said. “Thus, the Wind & Percussion Ensemble is vital to the prospects for success of the music education program, as are the Pfeiffer choral ensembles, which are already thriving under the able leadership of Joe Judge (class of 1987). I want people to see that Pfeiffer’s bands are the real deal. We’re going to do something about it.

By “bands,” Earp also meant Freddie Falcon’s House Band, a dynamic band who have also started rehearsing for their debut, which will take place at a Pfeiffer basketball game this winter. He will perform the University’s first fight song, for which Earp, also a prolific songwriter, writes the music and lyrics.

Earp, a trombonist with a PhD in Music Education from Liberty University, is interested in enrolling 10 majors in Music Education at Pfeiffer for the 2022-2023 academic year. In four years, if all goes according to plan, that number would increase to around 25 or 30.

The Wind & Percussion Ensemble would grow from its current 13 members to between 35 and 50 members. Like Mila Rutter (class of 2023), a junior environmental science major from Gold Hill, many of the players in the group won’t be majoring in music education or music. Instead, they will continue to practice music as a serious hobby, which would be consistent with a culture that encourages Pfeiffer students to participate in several extracurricular activities.

“I still want to play the trumpet and I want to learn how to play the drums,” said Rutter, who has performed in the East Rowan High School March and Jazz Orchestras. “I don’t intend to specialize in music, but I want to keep playing as long as possible. So the Wind & Percussion Ensemble was great for me.

Earp’s recruitment strategy will build on his successful experiences during his pre-Pfeiffer days as a builder of instrumental music programs, first at Cox Mill High School in Concord (2009-2017) then at Limestone. University in Gaffney, South Carolina (2017-2021). He will highlight the benefits of Pfeiffer’s culture when it comes to music education: “One of the special things about Pfeiffer is this little school experience. When you walk into an orchestra hall, for example, I’ll know more than your name. I’ll ask you how your classes are going and I’ll help motivate you to get things done for your classes.

Earp is a first generation student and his doctoral dissertation focused on the experiences of first generation students in an undergraduate music education program. Thus, he gets along particularly well with future first-generation university students who plan to follow in his footsteps in music education.

Earp will showcase his talents as a conductor as a guest assistant during rehearsals for the high school groups he visits. This could mean leading a section of a group or criticizing the balances and other delicate points of the whole. This way, future students will get a good idea of ​​Earp as a teacher / conductor.

Earp wants to attract potential students to the Misenheimer campus in Pfeiffer. One way to do this already exists: it recruits ensemble members from local community colleges and already has seven who have joined the group. Another way, which was also tried with success during Earp’s stay in Limestone, will be to bring together the best high school musicians in the area in an honorary band that rehearses and performs in Pfeiffer under the direction of a leading clinician.

“The likelihood of them dating Pfeiffer increases dramatically if you can get them on campus,” he said.

Finally, Earp works with other faculty and administrators to make the university’s music facilities more attractive to future music education graduates who visit his Misenheimer campus. One of the main priorities is to enlarge the stage in the Henry Pfeiffer Chapel, where the ensemble will perform, as it is too small for a concert orchestra. Another priority is to attenuate the too bright acoustics of the chapel with acoustic panels.

Pfeiffer’s new music education majors are said to be the first to graduate from college since the spring of 2014, four years after the phasing out of the music education major began (Pfeiffer’s board of directors approved the return major in music education at a meeting in June). They would leave college both as generalists capable of doing “any kind of work” in K-12 music and as specialists revolving around one of three areas of music: instrumental, choral or elementary.

Earp is quite optimistic about the employment opportunities for these graduates, noting that some parts of the region will need music teachers as new schools are being built to cope with the growing population. He also points out that there is always a certain turnover in teaching.

“There are a lot of jobs available and available,” he said. “I look forward to helping launch the careers of the next generation of Pfeiffer-trained music teachers. “

Want to go?

What: Under the direction of Joseph Earp, the Pfeiffer University Wind & Percussion Ensemble will present their “Autumn Concert”. The program will include the first Pfeiffer from Earp’s “Hatsuhi Sunrise” for percussion ensemble, with the ensemble as percussionists. Also presented will be “Sing Gently” by Eric Whitacre (transcribed from a choir for instrumental ensemble, by Verena Mosenbichler-Bryant), “Deus Ex Machina” by Randall Standridge, “At Morning’s Light” by David R. Gillingham and “Declaration Overture” by Claude T. Smith. “

When: 7 p.m. on November 2

Where: Henry Pfeiffer Chapel on the Misenheimer Campus of Pfeiffer University

Price: free and open to the public

Ken Keuffel, author of this article, has been Pfeiffer’s Deputy Director of Communications since December 2019. He welcomes article ideas from professors, staff, students, alumni and friends of Pfeiffer. The form for submitting story ideas is at www.pfeiffer.edu/newsform.

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