music education – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png music education – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Beginnings of music education in the Philippines https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:10:18 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us […]]]>

TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us a lot of loneliness, mental health threats, anxiety, stress and depression. Faced with this experience and faithful to faith in the goodness of our Heavenly Father, we turn to music to find the comfort we need. Given this, we are finding better ways to teach music education online.

History of ancient musical education. Three different contexts provide the context for music education in the Philippines. Music education can be provided to a community within the framework of a people’s culture. Another framework is a country’s basic youth education and a third is a college program that could lead to a professional career in music education or music performance. (Borromeo nd). Reminiscent of its beginnings, formal music education in the Philippines dates back to the 1500s when Spanish colonizers introduced Western music to the islands. “Solfege, vocalization and composition” were part of the actual musical training taught in schools “established by Church missionaries and music teachers” (Del Valle nd). As in any tradition, music education in the Philippines has seen relative changes with respect to curriculum content and structure. (https://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp › files › public › Mr.)

Mid-years. The Music Education Act of Republic Act (RA) 4723 passed in 1966 provided for the teaching of music and art as a separate subject at the elementary level and the teaching of music once a week for one hour at the secondary level (Yamzon, 1972). The second RA 5523 enacted in 1968 benefited music education by creating various school division positions providing for ten (10) music supervisory positions in ten school divisions of the former Public Schools Office. With the publication of the revised primary school curriculum of 1970, music and the arts were treated as separate subjects allocating 3 days a week to music and 2 days to the arts. The initial implementation of the aforementioned laws firmly entrenched music in the curriculum of public and private schools across the country (https://ncca.gov.ph ›… › Music)

21st century. Major changes in the K-12 reforms introduced music as a regular subject from grades 1-10 and the introduction in high school of the arts and design stream which serves as a preparation stream for future careers in higher music education. (https://www.semanticscholar.org › article › Music-Education…). Music education pedagogy aimed at teaching learners the basic concepts and processes in music, to appreciate, analyze and perform for the personal development of the learner, to understand the main characteristics of Philippine music and art and of the world. This pedagogy sought to inculcate the celebration of Filipino cultural identity and diversity and the expansion of the learner’s worldview. (https://www.academia.edu › K_to_.12_Curriculum_Gui..) A bachelor’s degree in education, usually majoring in MAPEH and graduating with a master’s degree in music education, must pass the teacher’s license exam to be officially a teacher of music.

Music conservatories. Students wishing to study music performance instead enroll in a performance and composition section of a music department more formally labeled as a music conservatory. In addition to honing students in musical composition, a conservatory teaches students to perform, such as playing musical instruments and singing. The Britannica informs that the term “conservatory” is derived from the “Italian conservatorio”. In the Middle Ages “choral schools were attached to churches”. “Music in medieval universities was a theoretical subject comparable to mathematics) as in the Ospedale della Pietà, founded in 1346 in Venice. Then came the Renaissance during which the Conservatorio made its debut. This term Conservatorio “designated a type of orphanage often attached to a hospital.” “The foundlings (conservati) received musical instruction at state expense. Naples was the center for the boys and Venice for the girls. Thus, we can consider that “the conservatori were the first secular institutions equipped for training in practical music. “The Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo (founded 1589, Naples) trained or had as faculty members most of the leading Italian opera composers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.” From the Britannica we learn that the first secular school of music for students founded in Paris in 1784 “was reorganized and renamed Conservatoire National de Musique et d’Art Dramatique in 1795 by the National Convention (the Revolutionary regime of 1792-1795). Throughout the 19th century, the French model was copied, with modifications, in Europe and the United States.” Of these conservatories, the Juilliard School seems to be popular among our musical virtuosos. (https://www. .britannica.com/art/conservatory-musical-institution) Among Philippine universities, besides colleges, the University of the Philippines, University of Santo Tomas, Silliman University, University of Filipino Women, University St. Paul, Adventist University (Silang Cavite), University of San Agustin, and Liceo de Cagayan University maintain music conservatories.

Pedagogy of music education. In a broad sense, the pedagogy of music education refers to “all practical, application-oriented, as well as scholarly endeavors aimed at teaching and instruction.” That being so, music teachers focus their music education classes on making learners know, understand, and perform all of the musical areas covered in the respective K-12 music education curricula. (Google, August 1, 2019) Although engagement in music education may not be a route to a professional career in music, music education in the Philippines aims to develop in students an “appreciation, participation, enthusiasm and a sustained curiosity for music, to benefit from their musical experiences through active involvement as creators, performers and listeners of music from a wide range of styles, traditions and cultures.” (https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teaching resources/discipline/arts/Pages/QMEF.aspx)

Teresita Tanhueco-Tumapon, PhD, one of the Philippines’ most accomplished educators and experts in the management of higher education institutions, studied at top universities in the Philippines and in Germany, Britain and Japan. She has held senior academic positions at Xavier University, Ateneo de Cagayan; was appointed by the president after EDSA 1986 to standardize campus operations at state institutions and served 17 years later as president of SUC. She is the director of the internationalization office and a lecturer at the Liceo University of Cagayan. Awards include the CHEd Lifetime Professional Achievement Award, the British Council Valuable Services Recognition Award, the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Ministry of Education Award for his initiatives as a pioneer member of the Philippine Teacher Education Council.

E-mail: [email protected]


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Beth Rivar Slusher of Give A Note on Equity in Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 14:51:08 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Where you grew up and where you live now. I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside […]]]>
Where you grew up and where you live now.

I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside of Indianapolis.

Your first musical memory.

Singing in the cherub choir at church when I was 4, and our family gathered around the piano to sing together at home.

Your first gig.

My first big gig was Elton John, he blew my mind!

Your favorite bands/musicians.

Elton John – his unparalleled ability with lyrics and music that made his songs resonate so deeply with his audience. Master musician and showman!

Chris Stapleton – an amazing raw talent who shows true gratitude to his fans.

Jennifer Hudson – her incredible voice and artistry for knowing when to belt her and when not to. Few people can navigate a song’s styling like she can!

How do you get your music these days.

Streaming—mainly Spotify.

Your favorite place to see a concert.

Intimate places with emerging artists. Nothing better than seeing someone before they become a household name and knowing they will!

Your favorite music video.

I loved and admired all of Michael Jackson’s videos, especially “Billy Jean” and “Thriller”. He had an incredible talent for weaving history through music, dance, costume, and drama. His attention to detail showed in every aspect of every video.

Your favorite music-focused TV show and/or podcast.

The Voice for a music-focused TV show. I’m not much of a podcaster.

A recent project you are proud of.

The pandemic has upended the music education programs in our schools. Many students, especially those from historically marginalized communities, were unable to participate in their school music programs simply because they could not afford the music-specific PPE that was needed. to play. And music is often the only reason some of these kids go to school every day. I’m extremely proud that Give A Note established the Let’s Play Music Fund during this time, providing over 13,000 specialized PPE, helping over 7,000 students from 86 schools in 18 states get back into the music classroom to play. Our mission is deeply rooted in creating equitable access and participation in music education, and while this was outside of our normal grant funding programs, it was exactly what teachers and the students needed – a way to bring the group together!

Someone else’s project you admired recently.

Last November, the Fisk Jubilee Singers celebrated their 150th anniversary with a benefit concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. One of Give A Note’s board members, Eric Holt, was on the organizing committee that produced the show. It was a remarkable tribute to the history of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, their contribution to music and to the city of Nashville and raised more than $1.5 million to secure an endowment for the sustainability of the organization. It was an impressive show of talent, history and philanthropy, all rolled into one incredible package!

How musicians should approach working with brands.

Musicians have a unique opportunity when working with a brand to change and expand the audience of for-profit and non-profit brands. The impact affects both the musician and the brand – and hopefully in a positive way. They need to have the endgame in sight when deciding if/when they want to line up on that mark.

How brands should approach working with musicians.

It’s the same idea in terms of knowing the endgame in advance. Brands should apply when they have a clear strategy on how much impact they want the musician to have on their brand, and know what benefits it will also create for the musician.

What music can do that nothing else can.

Music always makes us feel something, and often in a deeply profound way.

What you would be doing if you weren’t in the music business.

Marketing and advertising. I like the idea of ​​collaborating with others to create something that could change the way people think.

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Violinist Ezinma launches nonprofit to make music education accessible https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:34:26 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported. The classical music genre […]]]>

Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported.

The classical music genre has always been dominated by white men. Research shows that less than 2% of instrumentalists in American orchestras are black. For Ezinma, a classically trained musician who has collaborated with artists like Stevie Wonder, Kendrick Lamar and SZA—his journey in the industry is deeper than the music. With every performance, viral video and chord, the artist – whose work sits at the intersection of classical and hip-hop – strives to inspire individuals who don’t often see themselves reflected in space to challenge the status quo and follow their dreams.

She recently launched Strings by Heart; an organization designed to make music education accessible to young people in underserved communities. Through the non-profit organization, young people will have the opportunity to participate in music lessons led by accomplished educators, attend cultural events that will broaden their perspectives, and have access to quality instruments and supplies. . The program was created to use music as a vehicle to teach young people lessons they can apply in other areas of their lives.

Ezinma says her own coming-of-age experiences inspired her to start the foundation. “I remember the isolation I felt as the only black person in the orchestra, sometimes discouraged by my teachers from pursuing my dreams,” she shared in a statement, according to the outlet. “Yet the statistics clearly show that music education plays a vital role in helping children and young adults get on the path to achieving their goals, improving self-esteem and more. children of all backgrounds and communities deserve the chance to experience the joy of classical music and feel like they belong in this world, and what better genre than hip-hop to introduce young minds to the vast potential classical music?” She recently stopped by local Harlem schools to encourage children to join the program.

Although studies have shown that music programs are linked to better academic results, arts education initiatives are often suppressed or non-existent in underfunded schools; illustrating the need for programs like Strings by Heart.

SEE ALSO:

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10 photographs

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The music education program empowers students to have a positive influence on future musicians https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-music-education-program-empowers-students-to-have-a-positive-influence-on-future-musicians/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 13:59:16 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-music-education-program-empowers-students-to-have-a-positive-influence-on-future-musicians/ Music education is a profession that many seem to overlook. However, Olla native Daniel Wesson knew early on that his path would involve sharing the love of music with students. “I grew up in a family of musicians. My grandfather was a band manager, and during high school that seemed like the way to go,” […]]]>

Music education is a profession that many seem to overlook. However, Olla native Daniel Wesson knew early on that his path would involve sharing the love of music with students.

“I grew up in a family of musicians. My grandfather was a band manager, and during high school that seemed like the way to go,” Wesson said. “I also appreciated the way the director of my high school orchestra, Mr. Herb Bassett, treated his students. I realized that I wanted to be that kind of influence for someone else, not only teaching them the love of music, but also being a mentor and guiding them.

Throughout his life, Wesson was constantly supported by his family but especially by his grandfather, James Lee Carroll.

“He always included me in every musical thing he did. I was 6 years old and it was a Christmas parade in Olla,” Wesson said. “I asked him if I could walk with the band , and I can’t believe he said yes, but he took one of those little toy drums and his belt and made me a little scarf. He put me there next to the drummers, and I can honestly say that’s probably what started me on the path I’m on now.

The COVID-19 pandemic has complicated things for music education majors. Many schools weren’t allowed to have a band at all, and so many rules had to be changed for music majors and those involved in music.

“Indoor rehearsals have pretty much become non-existent,” Wesson said. “Making a band virtually is next to impossible, so the music world definitely took a hit when the lockdown happened. It put a damper on not being able to rehearse like we wanted to and then space out the phase effects, like being able to be on time with someone who is in the set.

However, Wesson said the music world has learned to adapt to the changes of the pandemic and made a lot of good innovations with special masks and cowbells for musicians.

“The hardest thing is not being able to play with people. I have a lot of methods lessons where I have to learn all the instruments, but with COVID these had to be very spread out and individualized rather than in group,” Wesson said.

Wesson has no regrets about deciding to major in music. For him, the best thing about being a music education student is the friends he made at Louisiana Tech.

“As a freshman I was very antisocial, but going into sophomore year I forced myself to make connections and friendships not only with other music majors, but also with other music majors. other musicians. To have these people in my life who are not just my friends but also my colleagues has been really special,” Wesson said.

After graduating, Wesson plans to teach high school harmony and mentor the next generation of musicians.

“I like rookie groups and more power for people who can do it, but that’s not for me,” Wesson said. “I want to be in a high school band, preferably a school size 3A or 4A. Once there, I just want to get the ball rolling. Not necessarily going in and changing the way things are done, but at least being able to build on what’s already there and hopefully improve the group they have.

Wesson hopes to put his own personality on as a band manager the same way his grandfather and band manager did in high school — and positively impact the next generation of musicians.

This story was written by communications major Leslee Bennett.

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Online music education market size [2022-2027] https://russjohnsonmusic.com/online-music-education-market-size-2022-2027/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 10:01:29 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/online-music-education-market-size-2022-2027/ Pune, March 02, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — World Online music education market The 2022 research report represents a detailed overview of the current market situation and forecast to 2027. The study is perhaps a perfect blend of qualitative and quantitative information highlighting key market developments, challenges , the competition faced by the industry, along with […]]]>

Pune, March 02, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — World Online music education market The 2022 research report represents a detailed overview of the current market situation and forecast to 2027. The study is perhaps a perfect blend of qualitative and quantitative information highlighting key market developments, challenges , the competition faced by the industry, along with the gap analysis and new available opportunities and trends within the Online Music Education Market. Additionally, this report gives the Online Music Education market size, recent trends, growth, share, development status, market dynamics, cost structure and competitive landscape. The research report also includes the current market and its growth potentials over the given forecast period. An exhaustive and professional study of the global Online Music Education market report has been carried out by industry professionals and presented in the most particular manner to showcase only the details that matter most. The report mainly focuses on the most dynamic information of the global market.

Get a sample PDF of the report – https://www.marketreportsworld.com/enquiry/request-sample/19704988

Market analysis and overview: Global online music education market

With industry-standard analytical accuracy and high data integrity, the report brilliantly attempts to uncover major opportunities available in the global Online Music Education Market to help players gain a strong position in the market. Marlet. Buyers of the report can access verified and reliable market forecasts including those regarding the overall size of the global online music education market in terms of revenue.

Online Music Education Market 2022 offers a comprehensive overview of crucial industry elements and elements such as drivers, restraints, past & present current trends, monitoring scenarios, and technological growth. The report also focuses on global major major industry players of Global Online Music Education Market providing information such as company profiles, product picture and specification, capacity, production , price, cost, revenue and contact details. This report focuses on Online Music Education Market trends, volume and value at global level, regional level and company level. From a global perspective, this report represents overall Online Music Education Market Size by analyzing historical data and future prospect.

Get Sample Copy of Online Music Education Market Report 2022

The list of major key players listed in the Online Music Education Market report are as follows:

  • MusicGurus
  • skoove
  • Yousician
  • Tonara
  • iMusic-School
  • TakeLessons,Inc
  • com
  • online dubspot
  • The Online Academy of Irish Music
  • Juilliard School
  • berklee online
  • Shanghai Miaoke Information Technology Co., Ltd. (VIP Peilian)
  • Moosiko, Inc.

Overall, the report proves to be an effective tool that players can utilize to gain a competitive edge over their competitors and ensure sustainable success in the global Online Music Education Market. All conclusions, data and information provided in the report are validated and revalidated using reliable sources. The analysts authoring the report have adopted a unique and industry-leading research and analytical approach to an in-depth study of the global Online Music Education Market.

Online Music Education Market Segmentation:

By device type

By type

  • music history
  • Musicology
  • Theory
  • Others

Online Music Education Market Segment By Application:

Learn more and share questions, if any, before purchase on this report at – https://www.marketreportsworld.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/19704988

Geographically, this report is segmented into several key regions, with sales, revenue, market share and growth rate of Online Music Education in these regions, from 2016 to 2027, covering

  • North America
  • Europe
  • Asia Pacific
  • South America
  • Middle East and Africa

Key Highlights of Online Music Education Market Report:

  • The report provides a comprehensive and broad perspective on the global online music education market.
  • The market statistics represented in different segments of online music education provide a comprehensive picture of the industry.
  • Market growth drivers, challenges affecting the development of online music education are analyzed in detail.
  • The report will help in the analysis of key competitive market scenarios, Online Music Education market dynamics.
  • Key stakeholders, major Online Music Education companies, investment feasibility and new market entrants study are offered.
  • The scope of online music education development in each market segment is covered in this report. Macro and micro-economic factors affecting the Online Music Education market
  • Progress is detailed in this report. The upstream and downstream components of online music education and a complete value chain are explained.

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Detailed TOC of Global Online Music Education Market Report 2022

1 Presentation of the report

1.1 Scope of the study
1.2 Market Analysis by Type
1.2.1 Global Online Music Education Market Size Growth Rate by Type: 2016 VS 2021 VS 2027
1.2.2 Piano
1.2.3 Guitar
1.2.4 Others
1.3 Market by Application
1.3.1 Global Online Music Education Market Share by Application: 2016 VS 2021 VS 2027
1.3.2 Children
1.3.3 Teenagers
1.3.4 Adults
1.4 Objectives of the study
1.5 years considered

2 Global Growth Trends

2.1 Global Online Music Education Market Outlook (2016-2027)
2.2 Online Music Education Growth Trends by Regions
2.2.1 Online Music Education Market Size by Regions: 2016 VS 2021 VS 2027
2.2.2 Online Music Education Historic Market Share by Regions (2016-2021)
2.2.3 Forecasted Market Size of Online Music Education by Regions (2022-2027)
2.3 Dynamics of the online music education industry
2.3.1 Online Music Education Market Trends
2.3.2 Online Music Education Market Drivers
2.3.3 Online Music Education Market Challenges
2.3.4 Constraints of the online music education market

3 Competition Landscape by Key Players

4 Online Music Education Breakdown Data by Type

5 Online Music Education Breakdown Data by Application

6 North America

7Europe

8 Asia-Pacific

9 Latin America

10 Middle East and Africa

11 key player profiles

12 analysts’ views/conclusions

13 Appendix

Continued….

Browse Full Table of Contents at – https://www.marketreportsworld.com/TOC/19704988#TOC

About Us: –

World Market Reports is the credible source for getting the market reports that will provide you with the direction your business needs. The market is changing rapidly with the continuous expansion of the industry. Technological advancements have provided today’s businesses with multi-faceted benefits driving daily economic changes. Thus, it is very important for a business to understand the patterns of market movements in order to better strategize. An effective strategy gives companies a head start in planning and an advantage over their competitors.

        
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Canadian research project reveals stark inequalities in music education across our country https://russjohnsonmusic.com/canadian-research-project-reveals-stark-inequalities-in-music-education-across-our-country/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/canadian-research-project-reveals-stark-inequalities-in-music-education-across-our-country/ Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)? » — Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director, TORONTO, ON, CANADA, Feb. 28, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The report, Everything is Connected: A Music Education Landscape, was led by the Coalition […]]]>
Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)? »

— Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director,

TORONTO, ON, CANADA, Feb. 28, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The report, Everything is Connected: A Music Education Landscape, was led by the Coalition for Music Education in Canada in partnership with others organizations including MusiCounts, Music Canada, Canadian Association of Music Educators, People for Education and the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning.

The principal investigator was Dr. Adam Con from the University of Victoria with assistance from Dr. Betty Anne Younker and Kyle Zavitz from Western University.

The objective of this study was to map the current structural, economic and social ecosystem that influences music education in Canada and to provide baseline data that can be used to inform future investigations.

Launched before the pandemic in 2019, the study was not designed to describe music education, but rather to reflect the current situation within provincial education systems. Acknowledging the demise of music education through the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic over the past two years, the report is hailed as an important expert resource for those developing education policy and rebuilding cohesive and valued music programming in the basic program.

The report exposes large inequities across jurisdictions, noting that in many cases children in the same school district, or even adjacent schools, have different access to music education. The report raises many issues of concern. For example, why do some schools dedicate one period per week to teaching music while others have three? Why do some schools offer access to a variety of instruments while others lack even basic equipment? Why do some jurisdictions have specialist music teachers and others instead rely on the classroom teacher to deliver the music curriculum?

Some of the key findings of the report highlight:

● Inequalities in music education curriculum requirements across the country.

● Inconsistent access to music education and resources, including relevant and current curricula, instruments, technology, equipment and materials.

● Gaps in programming based on urban versus rural access.

The Coalition has created provincial infographics showing many results. For example, the authors used Billboard Music’s hit songs as a reference for when each province’s music schedule was last updated. Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)?

Advocating for inclusion, diversity, equity and access, as well as the richness and cultural significance of music education in Canada, we hope this report will serve as a pathway for future policy development and will focus on implementing “policy into practice” in classrooms across the country.

For more information or to read the report, please visit our website. Media can access our media gallery here.

To speak to one of our spokespersons, Dr Eric Favaro (ENG) or David Peretz-Larochelle (ENG/FR) about the report and/or the impact of music education on future generations, please contact : Colleen McCourt, PR & Media Relations, Front Door PR, 705-358-2006, colleen@frontdoorpr.com Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director, Coalition for Music Education in Canada (905) 399-9732 stacey@coalitioncanada.ca

ABOUT THE COALITION FOR MUSIC EDUCATION
The Coalition for Music Education in Canada exists to increase awareness and understanding of the role music education plays in Canadian culture, and to promote the benefits that music education brings to young people.

The Coalition is made up of parents, students, educators, and business and community partners from diverse backgrounds who support music programs in schools and highlight the importance of music education for all young people in Canada.

For more information, visit www.coalitioncanada.ca

Colleen McCourt
Front door PR
+1 705-358-2006
write to us here
Visit us on social media:
Other

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VCU alum takes an alternative approach to music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/vcu-alum-takes-an-alternative-approach-to-music-education/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 15:01:32 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/vcu-alum-takes-an-alternative-approach-to-music-education/ Artwork by Tess Wladar Zahra Ndirangu, Contributing author Students in Nicolas Léonard’s class learn the basics of music through games, well-known songs and sensory methods. Leonard, a VCU Music Education alumnus and Chesterfield County teacher, uses the Kodály method to teach music in an alternative way. The Kodály method focuses on kinesthetic learning. Kinesthesia is […]]]>
Artwork by Tess Wladar

Zahra Ndirangu, Contributing author

Students in Nicolas Léonard’s class learn the basics of music through games, well-known songs and sensory methods.

Leonard, a VCU Music Education alumnus and Chesterfield County teacher, uses the Kodály method to teach music in an alternative way. The Kodály method focuses on kinesthetic learning. Kinesthesia is a sensory experience derived from the feeling of being aware of the movements and position of one’s body, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary.

Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly developed the Kodaly method in the middle of the 20th century and focuses on growing a child’s musical abilities by “meeting the child where they are,” according to Ginger Albertson, president-elect of the Virginia Organization for Kodály Educators.

“It’s very child-centered,” Albertson said. “It’s very developmentally appropriate for children and it’s important that we have fun.”

The Kodály Method differs from traditional music education in that it focuses on teaching music education in a way that makes sense to children. This is achieved through games and a focus on music the child already knows, according to Leonard.

“We approach it kinesthetically,” Leonard said. “They are actively doing something related to music.”

Leonard said the Kodály approach also involves teaching children music in their native language and emphasizing traditional folk music from other countries. The diversity among his students at Greenfield Elementary School facilitates this aspect of Kodály’s approach, according to Leonard.

“We live in the United States, so I’m going to teach a lot of these traditional American folk songs from centuries ago that we use as a base,” Leonard said. “However, for every American folk song I use, I also add a song from another country. It’s something that’s really close to my heart because we have such diversity in Greenfield.

VCU Music Education alumnus Nicolas Leonard uses the Kodály Method to teach music in an alternative way in Chesterfield County. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Léonard

Leonard was determined to attend a school outside of Richmond and pursue a major outside of music, as his parents were both music teachers. Initially, he didn’t want to follow in their footsteps, he said.

Leonard attended Christopher Newport University with a communications major, but said he soon realized he wanted to pursue his passion for music in college. He changed his major to music performance and later earned a degree in clarinet performance, according to Leonard.

Leonard said he went to VCU for his master’s degree in music education, which shaped the course of his career as an educator and musician. He was later introduced to Kodály through the program, according to Leonard.

“Through VCU, I shaped who I wanted to be as an educator,” Leonard said. “We talked about the good, the bad and the ugly. They don’t coat anything. Similar to Kodály, it was just a very complete experience overall.

Leonard said he was introduced to the Kodály method by his music education teacher at VCU, Alice Hammel, who urged him to get his Kodály certification before his first year of teaching.

Leonard said he initially chose to start teaching music in a more traditional way, but quickly discovered that this style of teaching was “not his favorite thing.” He took a two-year hiatus from teaching, then returned the following year with his Kodály certification and a renewed love for music education, according to Leonard.

“I passed my first level and I thought ‘this is exactly what I want to do,'” Leonard said. “It just spoke to me.”

Leonard currently uses the Kodály approach with his students from kindergarten through sixth grade. The teaching method builds on itself, making teaching and lesson plans concrete for each grade level, according to Leonard.

“I know exactly what order I want to teach things in,” Leonard said. “It’s a bit like a skyscraper. In early childhood, they come to me and we first build a solid foundation and with each grade level they progress. We scaffold and build things based on what they already know.

The approach consists of many different tactics, such as focusing on the singing voice and increasing musical literacy, according to VOKE president Ashley Cuthbertson.

“The idea that the voice is our primary instrument because we all have it and everyone has a right to music is something that really touches every aspect of my professional teaching career,” Cuthbertson said.

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Bienen School of Music Music Education Program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 06:36:28 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Podcast (nu-declassified): Listen in a new window | To download Subscribe: Spotify | Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music […]]]>

Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music teachers.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

FELIX GARKISCH: People have this stereotype of a music major. It’s like, “Oh, they don’t have to do much. All they have to do is practice their instrument or they don’t have to do any real work,” which I think is right — totally, completely wrong.

ERICA SCHMITT: It was Felix Garkisch, a freshman in the music education program at the Bienen School of Music. Félix’s main instrument is the violin.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

ERICA SCHMITT: While some Bienen students plan to play their instrument professionally, others, like Felix, strive to become teachers themselves.

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. This is NU Declassified, a look at how the Wildcats thrive and survive in Northwestern. I don’t know much about Bienen, but I always thought music was a really cool field to study at university. So, in this episode, I spoke to students and faculty in the music education program about the unique opportunities and challenges of the major. Felix said the music education major is slightly different from other Bienen majors.

FELIX GARKISCH: We have a lot of courses that we have to take by the time we graduate not only for our teaching students but also to get our teaching license. So it’s like all the other music majors. I would say that our courses are more academic, in general. There are certainly other practical or performance-based courses, like the various methods courses that I have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha Hussain is a freshman pursuing a dual degree in Music Education and Chemistry. One of the first classes she took in the music education program was Music Education 260-0, or Introduction to Music Education.

RISHA HUSSAIN: We will visit many middle schools, high schools and elementary schools in Chicago, and observe the teachers and their different styles. Teachers who are more active, teachers who let the children take the lead more, and we write a lot of observational reports and we discuss in class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha said she learned a lot about different teaching styles in her class.

RISHA HUSSAIN: In terms of teaching, we talk a lot about the types of teachers there are, so we’ll be playing with teachers who let the students do whatever they want. We call it a musical playground. So you don’t leave anything forbidden, like you sit on the floor with your children, if they are sitting on a carpet instead of standing on top of them. As body language is something we talked about a lot.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he liked the small classes in the music education program.

FELIX GARKISCH: Most of my teachers are really, really, really approachable. And that also means that even during class, they can see what your progress looks like, so even if you’re late or something, they can really, really, really easily help you out.

ERICA SCHMITT: For Risha, the program’s small size creates a sense of community and cohesiveness.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I feel like my teachers actually know me, which I guess feels a bit more like high school, at least for the standard high school experience where you have these consistent teachers. Like, if I take theory for two years, and it’s like I have this little tight-knit group of people because you usually take the same amount of time. And it’s as if you were part of the same group. And so you get to make a friend, and you feel comfortable around everyone. And then you don’t feel weird asking questions and stuff like that. It’s really nice to sit in there.

ERICA SCHMITT: In these classes, students must learn many different instruments as well as vocal and musical composition in order to prepare for the teaching environment. But on top of that, students also specialize in a specific instrument – ​​or voice.

RISHA HUSSAIN: So we have to take classes like percussion and strings and woodwinds to get used to the music that might be taught in an elementary school. And then you come into your concentration later.

ERICA SCHMITT: The music education program also offers three different paths for students to choose from: General Music Education, Instrumental Music Education, and Choral Music Education. Felix said the general track prepares students to –

FELIX GARKISCH: Entering an elementary or middle school class (and) teaching a music class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Félix pursues the instrumental music track.

FELIX GARKISH: This usually involves a band or orchestra, but it can extend to other things as well. Like, I know, some music teachers who run guitar lessons or also like music production lessons. So it’s not like the traditional stuff. There are so many things, it’s so open. And it’s really like, I can shape it however I want, which I think is really cool.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha is on the choir track.

RISHA HUSSAIN: The person who had the most impact on me was my choirmaster. And just kind of watching her watch all these kids grow up and teach and use music as a vehicle to not only talk about you know, music is pretty, but it can be a vehicle to inform a wider audience about things like social justice, and it can bring awareness to many things.

ERICA SCHMITT: Like Risha, Felix said he –

FELIX GARKISCH: Really, really admired my high school music teacher. And the experience I had in that class made me think, “Okay, I want to be able to give this to my own students one day.” So music education seems like the right choice for me.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: All music education majors must participate in a student teaching program, where they often work with certified Northwestern teachers. Each student works with two mentors during their teaching. To find out more about this, I spoke with Professor Stevi Marks, the student-teacher and assessment coordinator at Bienen.

STEVI BRANDS: So, to get a license in the state of Illinois, you must have completed all levels of prerequisite training. So that means let’s say, Erica, you came to me and said, “Man, I’m really interested, I want a high school experience.” But I love elementary kids, I’d like to be, you know, run an elementary program where I first introduce the kids to the instruments and then maybe rehearse them in middle school and then have an experience in high school. So I would be looking for something like that.

ERICA SCHMITT: Teacher mentors guide education majors through the teaching process in a hands-on environment. Marks said she matches students with mentors based on a variety of factors, asking questions like –

STEVI BRANDS: Who can we match you with that will work well for you? And do you have a car or do you rely on public transport? What kind of experiences do you want? Do you want a marching band? Do you want a mariachi? Do you want to work with a show choir or do you want to help direct the musical? We try to match our students with a position that will benefit them and really, really take them to another level as a teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he had a student teacher for his high school music program.

FELIX GARKISCH: I remember she was a music education student in the North West and she was a phenomenal teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Although the music education program is full of opportunities, it can be a heavy workload. For some dual degree students, the program can last five years.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I think mine is a bit heavier, because I have a four-year plan instead of a five-year plan but I’m, I was at 5.8 units right now. And the rest of my plan is around 6.3 to 6.8 units per quarter. And most of it is Bienen.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said the program has made some changes to its curriculum over the past few years to ease the workload for students.

STEVI BRANDS: We know that music education students have to take more credits than I think almost anyone across the University. So we were looking for ways to consolidate some of these courses. And so I incorporated some of the technical things about singing into my choral methods course, which all students have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: I asked Félix about his experience with the workload in music education classes.

FELIX GARKISCH: I mean, I love them. But they are designed to be difficult. And I appreciate that. It’s not like you can browse them all, you have to put in the effort to get a quality product out of it.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said that ultimately her goal is to motivate students to remain passionate about teaching students as she always has been.

STEVI BRANDS: Music education offers every child the opportunity to express themselves in a way that they will not find in any other discipline. And so that’s the most valid pursuit. And we need great music teachers and I’m proud to serve in that capacity. It scares me, Erica, it’s a big responsibility. These fabulous young adults are going to come out and they’re going to have their own classroom. And God willing, they’re going to make a difference like someone did in their life, a positive difference. And that’s what I think about every time I go to class.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. Thanks for listening to another episode of NU: Declassified. This episode was reported and produced by me. The Daily Northwestern’s Audio Editor is Will Clark, Digital Editor is Jordan Mangi, and Managing Editor is Isabelle Sarraf. Be sure to subscribe to The Daily Northwestern podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or SoundCloud to hear more episodes like this.

[music]

E-mail: [email protected]
Twitter: @eschmitt318

Related stories:
– Captured: Bienen’s fall concert series marks the return to in-person performances
— In Focus: Diversifying classical music through education
— NU Declassified: A Day at the Opera

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Encore: SWFL Music Education Center Unveils Career Pathway Program for Neurodivergent Student Musicians https://russjohnsonmusic.com/encore-swfl-music-education-center-unveils-career-pathway-program-for-neurodivergent-student-musicians/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/encore-swfl-music-education-center-unveils-career-pathway-program-for-neurodivergent-student-musicians/ This episode originally aired on January 31, 2022. The Southwest Florida Music and Education Center in Naples will soon be offering neurodivergent young adults a truly unique and comprehensive music education program to help them pursue careers in the music industry. Its curriculum, which was developed by the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special […]]]>

This episode originally aired on January 31, 2022.

The Southwest Florida Music and Education Center in Naples will soon be offering neurodivergent young adults a truly unique and comprehensive music education program to help them pursue careers in the music industry.

Its curriculum, which was developed by the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs, provides hands-on, career-focused music training for pre-college and college musicians who learn differently than their typical peers.

Southwest Florida Music Education Center

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Amaya Moher, inspired by the great Andrea Bocelli. When Rob Moher’s daughter graduated from high school, he struggled to find a path for her to become a professional musician, as she struggled with typical learning styles. So he worked with the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs in Boston to come up with something completely new.

The program is designed for young adults with diagnoses such as autism spectrum disorders, learning disabilities, pragmatic social communication disorders, and anxiety-related neurodiversity disorders.

The idea for the program was inspired by the founder and chair of the board of directors of the Southwest Florida Music Education Center’s daughter, who had graduated from high school but was struggling to find a path to her dream of become a professional musician.

After laying a solid foundation, the music program reinforces concepts over time to improve retention and accommodate a wide range of learning styles.

Additionally, other highly personalized programs include special education and mental health support, as well as peer and professional mentorship to help students develop life skills for self-care, advocacy and independence. This includes managing anxiety, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, building meaningful relationships, time management, executive functioning, personal safety, job skills and more.

At the time of registration, students must be between the ages of 16 and 30 with low to moderate support needs and must demonstrate primarily independent self-care skills. Students should also possess intermediate or higher level musical skills on one or more instruments, including voice, percussion, strings, guitar, and piano/keyboard.

Students take advantage of technology.jpg

Southwest Florida Music Education Center

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Amaya Moher uses technology to develop her talents.

For more information or to offer your support for this project, contact Jennifer Clark at JenC@SWFLmusic.org, call 239-205-8258, or visit SWFLmusic.org.

GUESTS

  • Rob Moher, Founder and Chairman of the Board of Southwest Florida Music Education Center
  • Dr. Rhoda Bernard, Founding Executive Director of the Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs
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Dayton Public Schools Superintendent Recognized for Supporting Music Education – WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio https://russjohnsonmusic.com/dayton-public-schools-superintendent-recognized-for-supporting-music-education-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/dayton-public-schools-superintendent-recognized-for-supporting-music-education-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ DAYTON — Dayton Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has received the Save The Music Foundation Award for her outstanding support of music education. The award recognizes a national school district superintendent or superintendent who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to restoring music education in their school district. In a statement, Lolli said she was honored that the […]]]>

DAYTON — Dayton Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has received the Save The Music Foundation Award for her outstanding support of music education.

The award recognizes a national school district superintendent or superintendent who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to restoring music education in their school district.

In a statement, Lolli said she was honored that the district’s efforts were recognized.

“Giving students the opportunity to actively play instruments, sing, and participate in other aspects of music education is truly invaluable to their overall success,” Lolli said in a statement.

>>Richmond Police Department is asking the community to help raise funds to buy a new K9

In 2019, Save the Music and Dayton Public Schools partnered to launch a district-wide music education program.

“Superintendent Lolli has been a champion of music education for all students in Dayton,” said Jaclyn Rudderow, senior director of school programs for Save The Music Foundation, in a statement.

In the three districts where Lolli previously worked, she also increased funding and support for band, choir, general music programs and professional staff development, according to a statement.

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