music lessons – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png music lessons – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Violinist Ezinma launches nonprofit to make music education accessible https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:34:26 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported. The classical music genre […]]]>

Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported.

The classical music genre has always been dominated by white men. Research shows that less than 2% of instrumentalists in American orchestras are black. For Ezinma, a classically trained musician who has collaborated with artists like Stevie Wonder, Kendrick Lamar and SZA—his journey in the industry is deeper than the music. With every performance, viral video and chord, the artist – whose work sits at the intersection of classical and hip-hop – strives to inspire individuals who don’t often see themselves reflected in space to challenge the status quo and follow their dreams.

She recently launched Strings by Heart; an organization designed to make music education accessible to young people in underserved communities. Through the non-profit organization, young people will have the opportunity to participate in music lessons led by accomplished educators, attend cultural events that will broaden their perspectives, and have access to quality instruments and supplies. . The program was created to use music as a vehicle to teach young people lessons they can apply in other areas of their lives.

Ezinma says her own coming-of-age experiences inspired her to start the foundation. “I remember the isolation I felt as the only black person in the orchestra, sometimes discouraged by my teachers from pursuing my dreams,” she shared in a statement, according to the outlet. “Yet the statistics clearly show that music education plays a vital role in helping children and young adults get on the path to achieving their goals, improving self-esteem and more. children of all backgrounds and communities deserve the chance to experience the joy of classical music and feel like they belong in this world, and what better genre than hip-hop to introduce young minds to the vast potential classical music?” She recently stopped by local Harlem schools to encourage children to join the program.

Although studies have shown that music programs are linked to better academic results, arts education initiatives are often suppressed or non-existent in underfunded schools; illustrating the need for programs like Strings by Heart.

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Superintendent Wins Outstanding Administrator Award from Oregon Music Education Association | News https://russjohnsonmusic.com/superintendent-wins-outstanding-administrator-award-from-oregon-music-education-association-news/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/superintendent-wins-outstanding-administrator-award-from-oregon-music-education-association-news/ Dr. Karen Gray is honored to win the Outstanding Administrator Award from the Oregon Music Education Association. The Outstanding Administrator Award is given in recognition of contributions to music education through administrative support. Here is the text read when she received this award on January 16: “Supporting an administrator’s music education is of the utmost […]]]>

Dr. Karen Gray is honored to win the Outstanding Administrator Award from the Oregon Music Education Association. The Outstanding Administrator Award is given in recognition of contributions to music education through administrative support.

Here is the text read when she received this award on January 16:

“Supporting an administrator’s music education is of the utmost importance and something for which we are always grateful. This year’s recipient is a superintendent who, over the past tumultuous years, has not only maintained but strengthened the Lincoln County School District’s music program Prior to the 2020-2021 school year, several schools in the district did not have a music teacher.

“This superintendent has made it his mission to place music teachers in every building in the district and now every student in Lincoln County, K-12, has access to music lessons and a music teacher in his building. It was the first step of many that she took to change the course of the history of music education in Lincoln County. Last year, she contacted music teachers in the district and held regular meetings to discuss how together they could develop music in the district. This included his desire for each area of ​​the county to have a ropes program as well as a five-year plan so that each school had what it needed to be successful.

“After a discussion on how to make the band fair for students regardless of economic status, she secured $300,000 in district funds to purchase instruments so that no student would be turned away because of their circumstances. financial. In addition, the money for the purchase of instruments came from district funds, not from the ESSER (Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief Fund) and is one of the most important investments for music education ever achieved in Lincoln County. She continues to meet monthly with music teachers in her district to support them, their programs, and music students.

In addition to supporting music in her district, this superintendent also supports music in her community as president of the Newport Symphony, actively working to bring professional musicians into the community and into classrooms to work with students. For all you do for your community, your schools, and your music students, we honor Dr. Karen Gray as OMEA 2022 Outstanding Trustee.”

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School of Rock Expands Groundbreaking Music Education Program to Latin America https://russjohnsonmusic.com/school-of-rock-expands-groundbreaking-music-education-program-to-latin-america/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 14:23:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/school-of-rock-expands-groundbreaking-music-education-program-to-latin-america/ CANTON, Mass., February 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — School of Rock, the global leader in performance-based music education, announces the opening of a second location in Mexico City, Mexico in late fall 2022. Matias Puga Hamilton, the Latin American master franchisee of School of Rock, is set to open 20 locations over the next 10 years. […]]]>

CANTON, Mass., February 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — School of Rock, the global leader in performance-based music education, announces the opening of a second location in Mexico City, Mexico in late fall 2022. Matias Puga Hamilton, the Latin American master franchisee of School of Rock, is set to open 20 locations over the next 10 years. School of Rock currently has two locations in Mexico: one in Mexico City and one in Monterrey.

“We are so proud to be part of this inspiring company and to help expand the global reach of School of Rock by bringing the fun, performance-based music education curriculum to places across Latin America,” noted Matias Puga Hamilton.

There are currently 301 School of Rock sites open and over 50,000 students enrolled, operating in 13 countries, including United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Chile, South Africa, Australia, Philippines, Paraguay, Colombia, Taiwan and Spain. School of Rock will open branches in Ireland and Portugal Later this year.

“School of Rock is thrilled to expand its franchise’s presence in Latin America and support the next generation of artists,” said Rob Price, CEO of School of Rock. “Matias and his team have already had such a positive impact on the students of Chile, Peru, Colombia and Paraguay and with his dedication to the School of Rock brand, he is the perfect person to lead this expansion into Mexico.”

School of Rock offers students of all ages an exciting and engaging music lesson experience, which includes bass lessons, guitar lessons, vocal lessons, drum lessons, and piano lessons. Drawing inspiration from all styles of rock and roll, students at the School of Rock learn theory and techniques via songs by legendary artists such as Aretha Franklin, the Beatles and Led Zeppelin. Through the school’s performance-based approach, students around the world have gained superior musical skills, with some going on to record deals and bigger platforms such as American Idol, The Voice and Broadway. .

About the school of rock

School of Rock helps budding musicians master their skills, unleash their creativity, and develop the tools they need to thrive in life. Founded as a unique school in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1998, School of Rock has grown into a rapidly growing international franchise with over 500 schools open and developing in 15 global markets. Since 2009, School of Rock has grown its student body from 4,000 to 50,000. School of Rock offers a wide variety of music lessons, including guitar lessons, vocal lessons, and piano lessons. The company also sells musical instruments and music gear through its GearSelect program. School of Rock was awarded US Patent 10,891,872 in 2021 for its innovative method of music education. School of Rock has also won the following industry awards: 2021 Franchise Innovation Award for Most Innovative Use of Customer-Facing Digital Tools; 2021 Global Franchise’s Awards Best Children’s Services and Education Franchise; 2022 Entrepreneur Magazine’s Franchise 500 Top Children’s Music Enrichment Brand; Franchise Business Review’s Top 200 List and Culture 100 in 2021; Top 200 Franchise Entrepreneur Magazine 2020 and #1 Child Enrichment Franchise; and 2018 Forbes #2 Best Franchise Medium-Level Investment Award and #1 Music Franchise in America.

Follow School of Rock on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SchoolofRockUSA and on Twitter at www.twitter.com/SchoolofRockUSA.

For more information about School of Rock, visit www.SchoolofRock.com or call 866-695-5515. To learn more about School of Rock franchise opportunities, visit http://franchising.schoolofrock.com/

For more information contact:
Avery Barzizza
BizCom Associates
513.520.3463
[email protected]

SOURCE School of Rock

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Alumnus receives $500,000 for music education program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/alumnus-receives-500000-for-music-education-program/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 05:31:38 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/alumnus-receives-500000-for-music-education-program/ The Heartbeat Music Project, which provides music education to Navajo students, is the recipient of the Lewis Prize for Music Accelerator Award Adam McPhail 00h27, February 03, 2022 Six years ago, Ariel Horowitz MUS ’19 ’20 was a junior at Julliard studying violin performance when she learned she had the opportunity to lead a short […]]]>

The Heartbeat Music Project, which provides music education to Navajo students, is the recipient of the Lewis Prize for Music Accelerator Award

Adam McPhail

00h27, February 03, 2022


Six years ago, Ariel Horowitz MUS ’19 ’20 was a junior at Julliard studying violin performance when she learned she had the opportunity to lead a short music education summer camp for Navajo students. In January, she received a $500,000 Accelerator Award from the Lewis Prize for Music for advancing the musical and educational ambitions of the project.

Founded in 2016 by Horowitz and based in Crownpoint, New Mexico, the Heartbeat Music Project, or HMP, provides free music education to students from nearby Navajo communities. Accomplished musicians teach students aged 5 to 19 to play the instruments of their choice. Instructors teach students music theory and encourage them to play traditional Diné, or Navajo melodies and songs.

“The gift we just received from the Lewis Prize is so amazing,” Horowitz said. “There are so many barriers to accessing a music education in a very rural Indigenous community that has historically been oppressed, marginalized and unfunded.”

HMP offers a two-week summer camp and a one-week winter camp. Students receive free transportation to and from home, two meals, and snack breaks.

Music teachers come from a variety of backgrounds. Some come from classical music or jazz departments of schools and conservatories across the country. The other instructors are local and native musicians from the Navajo community.

Although students only participate in the program during the summer and winter, they can keep an instrument at home year-round to practice, thanks to a private donation in early 2021 that enabled HMP to provide students almost all the instruments typically found in a classical orchestra. or jazz band.

“We would like to expand our instrument library even further if we can,” Horowitz said. “Specifically, we’d like to find more non-classical, non-jazz instruments – native instruments too.”

Additionally, the HMP coordinates free virtual lessons when camps are not in session. However, many budding Navajo musicians lack access to a stable internet connection. Some students drive for hours to get free, stable Wi-Fi for virtual music lessons. With the new award, Horowitz and the rest of HMP want to change that and overcome some of the barriers preventing students from pursuing music.

Additionally, the HMP hopes to expand the overall reach of the program. Currently, the HMP can only serve the eastern portion of the Navajo Reservation, located in New Mexico. They would also like to provide students who live further afield in Arizona with access to a music education.

“We want a lot of the money to be spent on student learning,” said Sharon Nelson, HMP executive director and Diné assistant professor of culture, language and leadership at Navajo Technical University. . “We hope to be able to reach other areas of the reservation, including other tribes.”

Along with music lessons, rehearsals and workshops, Nelson, who is Diné herself, teaches students about Diné culture as part of the program. She noticed that many students were disconnected from their grandparents due to language and cultural barriers and wanted to bridge the intergenerational gap and help students connect with their community and culture. Nelson hopes students can combine the skills learned in music lessons with lessons about Diné culture and traditions to crystallize their identity.

“One of the things we want our kids to be is to become holistic,” Nelson said. “We want them to be self-centered and at peace with themselves, so we’re giving them the tools to do that using Navajo cultural teaching.”

The program operates in a tricky intersection. According to HMP Deputy Director Gregory Lewis MUS ’27, Western music has been reserved for wealthy whites for most of its history. Horowitz further noted that Western music was widely disseminated by imperialism – the same structures that have continually oppressed the Navajo people as well as other Indigenous communities in the United States and around the world.

“Early on, Sharon told us that it was really essential that we teach the children to play Diné songs on the instruments and not just Western music,” Lewis said. “She didn’t want them to learn music if it didn’t mean learning their own music and preserving their own culture.”

HMP hopes to recontextualize classical music and help students approach music with new techniques and perspectives. Music, they believe, should not have a hierarchical power structure. Instead, the program tries to give students resources and let them express themselves however they want.

The Lewis Prize for Music seeks to bring about positive social change by funding non-profit organizations to provide high quality music education to students. The Accelerator Award given to HMP is the Lewis Prize for Music’s highest monetary award.

Adam McPhail | adam.mcphail@yale.edu

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Realtimecampaign.com discusses the surprising benefits of online music education for kids https://russjohnsonmusic.com/realtimecampaign-com-discusses-the-surprising-benefits-of-online-music-education-for-kids/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 22:03:07 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/realtimecampaign-com-discusses-the-surprising-benefits-of-online-music-education-for-kids/ At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, most schools went online. Although it has quickly become apparent that having children receive an online-only education can be socially limiting and make it harder for them to stay focused, some subjects are even better taught online, including music education. Read on to find out some of the […]]]>

At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, most schools went online. Although it has quickly become apparent that having children receive an online-only education can be socially limiting and make it harder for them to stay focused, some subjects are even better taught online, including music education. Read on to find out some of the surprising benefits of enrolling kids in online music lessons to see why.

Access to instructors

Not all future musical prodigies live in major metropolitan areas with access to all kinds of teachers, which means many rural and suburban kids miss out on music lessons altogether. The good news is that according to realtimecampaign.com, children growing up in rural areas now have much greater access to all kinds of educational resources, including private and group music lessons. Given that learning to play an instrument has been shown to improve executive function and academic achievement, it cannot be underestimated how helpful this increased access to qualified music teachers can be in leveling the playing field. rules of the game.

Ability to observe practice environment

When students arrive for in-person music lessons, the instructor has no idea what factors may influence their progress. A poor home practice environment can prevent students from making meaningful improvements between classes, but teachers may not recognize this problem when offering classes in studios or classrooms. With online music education, it’s easy for instructors to recognize distractions, misconfiguration, or other environmental issues that could be corrected to get the student back on track.

Ability to save lessons for later review

Some students have trouble remembering what they are supposed to practice. Online music lessons can be recorded, however, meaning forgetful students can go back and watch the part of the video that offers instructions for the week’s homework. Additionally, teachers can also go back and review lessons to identify both strengths and weaknesses in the student’s play.

Affordability of Online Music Lessons

Although the online music education market size is expected to reach $421.9 million by 2027, offering video lessons actually helps keep costs more reasonable for low-income students and their families. Organizations such as Save the Music compile online music education resources and offer a range of music grants to improve disadvantaged students’ access to online and in-person music education.

Fewer missed classes

Students miss weekly classes for a variety of reasons, many of which are discussed on our website. Taking classes online helps remove barriers that might otherwise cause students to jump, including inclement weather, an inconvenient location, or family health issues. Parents don’t need to take time off from busy schedules to drive kids to and from class, and students, themselves, will benefit from having more time due to the elimination of commuting.

Find a program today

Parents can find all the resources they need to help their children learn music online. It doesn’t have to cost a fortune and there are grants to cover the cost of the instruments. Discover the resources available today.

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Savannah Music Stores Aim To Give Students A Quality Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:25:55 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ [ad_1] Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat. It often starts with […]]]>


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Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat.

It often starts with that decision in elementary school where students have the option of choosing an after-school program, such as a band or orchestra, which often continues through high school. In this journey it is common to see the relationship and collaboration between students, group programs and music stores that champion music education.

The legacy of Portman’s Music Superstore

Portman Music Superstore, a longtime Savannah staple, has an intimate relationship with group programs across the Southeast. Founded in 1936 by Ben Portman, Portman’s has been instrumental in the development of band and orchestral programs in the region. Jerry Portman, son of Ben Portman, currently owns the store and his wife Myra oversees the office. He said that prior to his and his father’s involvement in schools in the early 1950s, there were little or no band programs in the public school system and private schools in Savannah-Chatham County.

“My dad got a call from a few musical instrument companies that make instruments, and they said, ‘If we sent you horns in August, would you give them to the kids in the school marching band? beginner? And then whatever you don’t rent, send it back to us in October, and we can calculate the payment for the horns that have been rented. That’s how he officially got into the business, ”explained Jerry Portman. “He and I helped start music programs in schools that had never had music programs before. “

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

Portman’s has other locations in Albany, Augusta and Brunswick and rents instruments to thousands of students each year. They also offer full repairs and music lessons with 45 qualified instructors. They laid the groundwork for the group programs students participate in today and, at the forefront, they emphasize the importance of music education.

16-year-old Anne Ou takes piano lessons with instructor Hannah Wong at Portman's Music Superstore on Abercorn Street.

“We are proud to have done this for 85 years. We created it. We are still going strong. We are dedicated to music education. We are doing everything we can, ”said Myra Portman.

Guitar and Music & Arts Center

Students and parents alike looking for places to rent and purchase instruments don’t have to look far. On the same street as Portman’s, Abercorn is lined with two other stores that emphasize the importance of music education: Guitar Center and its subsidiary Music & Arts, the two retail chains, they claim, provide the largest selection of instruments in the United States.

The Music & Arts storefront located at 7805 Abercorn St., Suite 20A.

“Music education is what it all comes down to at the end of the day,” said Mike Marra, Retail District Manager for Music & Arts. “We can offer students the opportunity to explore a new art and give them a platform to express themselves. Music education has been proven to increase test scores and academic ability. For us to bring that into this community, that’s who we all are.

Following:2021 has been a year of resilience, innovation in Savannah’s art scene

Both stores also offer private and group musical instrument lessons with qualified instructors, rentals and repairs, contributing to the many choices available to students in acquiring a quality music education.

The Guitar Center showcase located at 7700 Abercorn St.

Guitar Center opened on the lot next to Portman’s in November 2021. Music & Arts opened across the street in April 2021; However, said Marra, prior to the physical establishment, Music & Arts had worked in partnership with directors of local bands and orchestras for more than six years, helping students choose the instruments that were best for them.

“A big part of educating and maintaining music is about getting kids interested. And we provide services that help these principals go into elementary schools and reach out and motivate these people to try and get started so that we can continue to bring music to life in schools, ”said Marra.

Music during the pandemic

Like many businesses, the pandemic has affected the operation of these music stores. Guitar Center and Music & Arts offer virtual lessons, and Portman’s installed an air purification system to make lessons safer for educators and students.

Rodney Gerido is a 52-year-old tank top who started taking guitar lessons with instructor Lee Cheek at Portman's Music Superstore in January 2021.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed operations, music education has persisted, from children to adults.

Following:Not a Record: Local Savannah Record Stores on Vinyl Sales and Popularity Increase

Jerry Portman said when people started to come back, it wasn’t the kids who came through the doors first, but more adults.

Studies have shown that music helps people get through the pandemic, which is evident in trends such as increased sales of musical vinyls since 2020 and increased sales of guitars. According to a study by Fender YouGov, nearly 16 million people have taken back the guitar since the COVID-19 pandemic.

A wall of guitars at the Savannah Guitar Center.  Will Bryant, chief executive, said there was an increase in the number of people wanting to learn to play the guitar during the pandemic.

“There was certainly a great deal of interest in people looking to buy a new instrument, whether it was a seasoned musician who has been playing drums for years, who perhaps wanted to get into the guitar.” , said Will Bryant, Managing Director of Savannah Guitar. Center. “We’ve also had a lot of people who were just looking for a hobby to take their time while they’re stuck at home. And a lot of people kind of look to the guitar for that because so many people would come and say that they wanted to learn to play guitar for years and years and years. Now that they are kind of forced to take that free time, it has given them the opportunity to follow that passion. ”

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

The stores also make an effort to supply musical instruments to other organizations in Savannah. Friends of Ben Tucker Inc., the charity honoring jazz great Ben Tucker, partners with Portman’s to provide musical instruments to underprivileged children in the Savannah area, and Music & Arts has partnered with Savannah Jazz to sponsor the 2021 festival master classes.

For a city like Savannah that is teeming with music, music stores are providing the next generation with the tools to acquire a quality music education.

“It just means the music is always popular. The groups will be there forever. School music will be here forever, ”said Myra Portman.

Laura Nwogu is the Quality of Life reporter for Savannah Morning News. Contact her at lnwogu@gannett.com. Twitter: @lauranwogu_

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Yamaha: Establishment of a music school in Riyadh as the first officially authorized music education institution in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia https://russjohnsonmusic.com/yamaha-establishment-of-a-music-school-in-riyadh-as-the-first-officially-authorized-music-education-institution-in-the-kingdom-of-saudi-arabia/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 02:19:05 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/yamaha-establishment-of-a-music-school-in-riyadh-as-the-first-officially-authorized-music-education-institution-in-the-kingdom-of-saudi-arabia/ [ad_1] Establishment of a Yamaha Music School in Riyadh as the first officially authorized music education institution in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Yamaha Corporation (below, “Yamaha”) is pleased to announce the opening of the Yamaha Music School Riyadh in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (below, “Saudi Arabia”) in November 2021 as the first officially […]]]>


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Establishment of a Yamaha Music School in Riyadh as the first officially authorized music education institution in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Yamaha Corporation (below, “Yamaha”) is pleased to announce the opening of the Yamaha Music School Riyadh in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (below, “Saudi Arabia”) in November 2021 as the first officially authorized musical education institution of the Kingdom.

Saudi Arabia is known to be one of the countries with the strictest religious discipline in the Middle East and Gulf region, and for the past 50 years it has banned the performance or dissemination of music in public places. However, in response to the changes in this situation brought about by Saudi Vision 2030* policy, which the country actively promotes, and after having applied since 2016 for a license to operate music lessons, which has been approved by the local authorities, Yamaha has succeeded in opening the Yamaha Music School Riyadh – the first official music school allowed in the private sector.

The Yamaha Music School Riyadh is located in a shopping mall in central Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, and adjoins an exhibition hall featuring Yamaha musical instruments and audio equipment. Various course programs are available to meet a wide range of needs, from 4 year olds to adults interested in music. In addition to piano, keyboard, electric guitar and violin lessons, the school also plans to offer lessons in drums, wind instruments, etc.

Yamaha is also planning to open schools in Jeddah and Al Khobar, which are the main cities of Saudi Arabia, and to establish music promotion activities in Saudi Arabia and to contribute to the development of musical culture throughout the region. Kingdom.

Comments from Mohammed Al Mulhem, CEO of the Music Commission, Ministry of Culture, Saudi Arabia

It is the first Yamaha music school to open in Saudi Arabia. This means that anyone interested in music has been promised the opportunity to take music lessons at this school.

Comments from Kennei Sakai, General Manager, Asia-Pacific Sales Division

Yamaha is happy to share its business philosophy of “Sharing Passion and Performance” and we hope to help enrich people’s lives through sound and music. We are extremely happy to open a government approved music school in Saudi Arabia and through this music school to be able to offer the Saudi people the joy and excitement of music and the pleasure of playing musical instruments. music. “Quality of life” is an important theme of Saudi Vision 2030, which aligns with Yamaha’s goal of enriching people’s lives. With the opening of this school, we hope to further contribute to the development of music culture and education in Saudi Arabia.

  • * Saudi Vision 2030: a strategic framework for Saudi Arabia to diversify and avoid its dependence on oil revenues.

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Many children “do not receive any musical education” https://russjohnsonmusic.com/many-children-do-not-receive-any-musical-education/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 15:33:46 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/many-children-do-not-receive-any-musical-education/ [ad_1] A survey found that a significant minority of primary school teachers say music is “non-existent” or “virtually non-existent” in their schools, reports Emma Seith. The research – carried out by the Royal Conservatory of Scotland (RCS) – also found that nearly one in ten teachers surveyed answered ‘never’ when asked how often children in […]]]>


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A survey found that a significant minority of primary school teachers say music is “non-existent” or “virtually non-existent” in their schools, reports Emma Seith.

The research – carried out by the Royal Conservatory of Scotland (RCS) – also found that nearly one in ten teachers surveyed answered ‘never’ when asked how often children in their class attended music lessons. , although the largest proportion (33 percent) said music lessons were taken weekly.

Meanwhile, only 3 percent of elementary teachers said their schools had a “structured and cohesive curriculum” in music education.

Respondents to the survey of 437 primary school teachers most often indicated that music education varied from class to class depending on the comfort level of each teacher (60%) and that music was predominantly covered by the preparation of assemblies and school performances (55%). .

Only 6 percent of those surveyed said music lessons involved children playing various instruments.

Dr Lio Moscardini, one of the report’s authors and Senior Lecturer in Learning and Teaching at RCS, said: ‘Probably what worried me most was that 15% of all respondents indicated that music education was either “non-existent” or “virtually non-existent” in their schools, with 9 percent of those surveyed in the study stating that children in their primary schools do not take any music lessons.

“That’s a lot of kids who don’t get any music education. Evidence from the data is that this was three times more likely to be the case in SIMD [Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation] 1 and 2 zones compared to rich zones. “

Almost all respondents – 98 percent – considered music education in elementary school to be important, but most (73 percent) said their initial teacher education had not prepared them to teach music, while more two-thirds stated that they had not participated in any professional learning activity related to music education.

About three-quarters of the staff surveyed (73 percent) felt that music should be taught by someone other than the regular teacher.

However, the report – released this month and titled Primary school music education in Scotland – stressed that “this proposal is problematic on a number of fronts”, not least because “the reality is that there are only 49 music specialists in primary schools in Scotland”. Dr Moscardini argued that “a more pragmatic solution is to focus on how best to help elementary teachers develop their ability to teach music”.

He added: “Teachers already have the pedagogical knowledge to do this, what many lack are content-specific knowledge. This could be developed through a more collaborative approach where music organizations are working to support teachers in their classroom practice in a way that connects with what teachers already know and do and that supports a more sustainable model. “

Ultimately, the report calls for a national campaign to raise the status of music in primary schools and for each primary to have a designated “music coordinator” from among the teaching staff who helps colleagues to teach “class music”.

It also calls for an audit of all professional learning opportunities throughout the career in primary music education.

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Music education in Scotland dominates UK, says Professor Nicholas Daniel https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-in-scotland-dominates-uk-says-professor-nicholas-daniel/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-in-scotland-dominates-uk-says-professor-nicholas-daniel/ [ad_1] SCOTLAND is at the forefront of UK countries in providing children with vital access to music education, according to Professor Nicholas Daniel. The oboist and conductor says England, Northern Ireland and Wales must “catch up” after the Scottish Parliament pledges to provide free music lessons to all children This year. Professor Daniel, 59, spoke […]]]>


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SCOTLAND is at the forefront of UK countries in providing children with vital access to music education, according to Professor Nicholas Daniel.

The oboist and conductor says England, Northern Ireland and Wales must “catch up” after the Scottish Parliament pledges to provide free music lessons to all children This year.

Professor Daniel, 59, spoke after receiving an OBE for music services during a ceremony at Windsor Castle hosted by the Princess Royal on Tuesday.

He said: “Music is like oxygen, it’s free for all of us, it’s a human right in its own right.

“Now in Scotland they’re going to give music lessons to all the kids, and England, Northern Ireland and Wales are trying to catch up.

“The Scottish Parliament has realized that this is absolutely fundamental to a child’s development.

“I would say there is a lot to be said about letting a child learn music, not just classical, but letting a child learn to read music and play a musical instrument and he can take it as it sees fit – rap, pop, classical – everywhere. ”

READ MORE: Boris Johnson branded a liar by French journalist Marion van Renterghem

Daniel was one of a leading group of musicians who launched a campaign in 2018 to ensure that all elementary school students had the chance to play an instrument at no cost to their families.

From September 2021, the Scottish government has pledged £ 7million in funding to ensure children receive free music lessons.

Daniel described receiving his OBE as “an incredible honor”.

“Getting noticed for it means a lot and apparently it also means a lot to my colleagues, who have written to me to say that they are so happy that music is still so important in the national psyche, so it’s a beautiful thing, ”he said.

Daniel was recognized for his talent when he won the BBC Young Musician of the Year award in 1980, before cementing his career with performances at the BBC Proms.

He has performed in several international orchestras, from the Jonkoping Symphony Orchestra in Sweden and the Lapland Chamber Orchestra to Spectrum in Berlin, Budapest Strings and the California-based chamber ensemble, Camerata Pacifica.

The oboist was recently appointed artistic director and principal conductor of the Orion Orchestra, which offers young musicians the experience of performing in concert halls in central London.

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A game changer for music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 00:22:42 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ [ad_1] Reading time: 4 minutes The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional […]]]>


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Reading time: 4 minutes

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional musicians, but will also lead to better academic performance and student well-being.

Through Amadeus’ Music Education Program, 33,000 students in Sydney’s 150 Catholic schools will benefit from a quality music education, including learning to play a musical instrument by early 2024.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said the program builds on the great tradition of music education in Catholic education, with benefits extending far beyond the curriculum. music itself.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus. “

“There is a strong correlation between excellent musical progress in schools and better academic performance in reading, writing, arithmetic and analytical skills. So this was a time when we could put it all together and create a huge opportunity for all the students in our system, ”he said.

The program offers students in-class music lessons, ensemble lessons and small group lessons and will be led by more than 80 classroom music teachers and 270 specialist music teachers.

Tutors bring with them professional experience of orchestras and ensembles across Australia and the world, with strong program support from the Sydney Youth Orchestra, Sydney Conservatory of Music and Opera Australia. .

Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre” width=”808″ height=”488″ srcset=”https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4.jpg 808w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-300×181.jpg 300w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-768×464.jpg 768w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-696×420.jpg 696w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-695×420.jpg 695w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-600×362.jpg 600w” sizes=”(max-width: 808px) 100vw, 808px”/>
Students of the Amadeus Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large,” said Opera Australia Artistic Director Lyndon Terracini.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus.”

The program started with a successful pilot project involving 13 schools in the Auburn-Lakemba network.

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case, and even show up for the tutorials on time.

One of the schools involved, Holy Spirit College mixed secondary school in Lakemba, said it was already reaping the rewards.

Principal Phillip Scollard said this has helped to dramatically expand access to music education for students from all socio-economic backgrounds.

“With our 7 years, even though it’s been up for a year, we can see that it really helps them engage in their learning more effectively, including better focus. Music is not a cheap business and therefore a program like this is also a real social leveler, ”he said.

Grade 7 student Elyssia Deeb started playing the transverse flute and said she had benefited greatly from the Amadeus program.

“It also helped me improve my memory because I have to remember all the notes. It gives everyone the opportunity to play musical instruments that we might not have otherwise been able to access. It’s a wonderful program and we get constant support and guidance from our music teachers, ”she said.

His classmate John-Paul Sukkar also had a very positive experience learning to play the viola.

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large. “

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case and even show up for the tutorials on time, ”he said.

The Creative and Performing Arts Coordinator at Holy Spirit College Ms Emma Hughes said the Amadeus program is starting to unlock many previously untapped musical talents among students.

“They never had the experience of playing the flute or the cello or anything and some students never even knew these instruments existed,” she explained.

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program.  Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools
The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

“So it has been very exciting to unlock these abilities that you would never have known existed without this program.”

Head of St John Vianney Elementary School in Greenacre, Mr. Justin Coupland said classes in the program had moved online during the recent lockdown, but face-to-face tutoring would resume soon.

“COVID embarrassed a bit, which made face-to-face teaching quite difficult, but tutors continued to post online through Google Classroom,” he said.

“As our grade 3 students start and enter high school, we’ll see the music programs evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary school, but particularly in high schools…”

Thanks to the program, students in grades 3 to 8 will have access to 52,000 different instruments by 2024 and in-class music lessons will begin in kindergarten.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said it would have many long-term benefits.

“As we have our grade 3 students starting and entering high school, we will see the music curricula evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary, but especially in high schools, we will have students who have benefited from four years of practice, working in ensembles and bands which will then enter our high schools with real confidence and will greatly contribute to the music programs of our schools, ”he added.

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