music music – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png music music – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Beginnings of music education in the Philippines https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:10:18 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us […]]]>

TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us a lot of loneliness, mental health threats, anxiety, stress and depression. Faced with this experience and faithful to faith in the goodness of our Heavenly Father, we turn to music to find the comfort we need. Given this, we are finding better ways to teach music education online.

History of ancient musical education. Three different contexts provide the context for music education in the Philippines. Music education can be provided to a community within the framework of a people’s culture. Another framework is a country’s basic youth education and a third is a college program that could lead to a professional career in music education or music performance. (Borromeo nd). Reminiscent of its beginnings, formal music education in the Philippines dates back to the 1500s when Spanish colonizers introduced Western music to the islands. “Solfege, vocalization and composition” were part of the actual musical training taught in schools “established by Church missionaries and music teachers” (Del Valle nd). As in any tradition, music education in the Philippines has seen relative changes with respect to curriculum content and structure. (https://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp › files › public › Mr.)

Mid-years. The Music Education Act of Republic Act (RA) 4723 passed in 1966 provided for the teaching of music and art as a separate subject at the elementary level and the teaching of music once a week for one hour at the secondary level (Yamzon, 1972). The second RA 5523 enacted in 1968 benefited music education by creating various school division positions providing for ten (10) music supervisory positions in ten school divisions of the former Public Schools Office. With the publication of the revised primary school curriculum of 1970, music and the arts were treated as separate subjects allocating 3 days a week to music and 2 days to the arts. The initial implementation of the aforementioned laws firmly entrenched music in the curriculum of public and private schools across the country (https://ncca.gov.ph ›… › Music)

21st century. Major changes in the K-12 reforms introduced music as a regular subject from grades 1-10 and the introduction in high school of the arts and design stream which serves as a preparation stream for future careers in higher music education. (https://www.semanticscholar.org › article › Music-Education…). Music education pedagogy aimed at teaching learners the basic concepts and processes in music, to appreciate, analyze and perform for the personal development of the learner, to understand the main characteristics of Philippine music and art and of the world. This pedagogy sought to inculcate the celebration of Filipino cultural identity and diversity and the expansion of the learner’s worldview. (https://www.academia.edu › K_to_.12_Curriculum_Gui..) A bachelor’s degree in education, usually majoring in MAPEH and graduating with a master’s degree in music education, must pass the teacher’s license exam to be officially a teacher of music.

Music conservatories. Students wishing to study music performance instead enroll in a performance and composition section of a music department more formally labeled as a music conservatory. In addition to honing students in musical composition, a conservatory teaches students to perform, such as playing musical instruments and singing. The Britannica informs that the term “conservatory” is derived from the “Italian conservatorio”. In the Middle Ages “choral schools were attached to churches”. “Music in medieval universities was a theoretical subject comparable to mathematics) as in the Ospedale della Pietà, founded in 1346 in Venice. Then came the Renaissance during which the Conservatorio made its debut. This term Conservatorio “designated a type of orphanage often attached to a hospital.” “The foundlings (conservati) received musical instruction at state expense. Naples was the center for the boys and Venice for the girls. Thus, we can consider that “the conservatori were the first secular institutions equipped for training in practical music. “The Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo (founded 1589, Naples) trained or had as faculty members most of the leading Italian opera composers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.” From the Britannica we learn that the first secular school of music for students founded in Paris in 1784 “was reorganized and renamed Conservatoire National de Musique et d’Art Dramatique in 1795 by the National Convention (the Revolutionary regime of 1792-1795). Throughout the 19th century, the French model was copied, with modifications, in Europe and the United States.” Of these conservatories, the Juilliard School seems to be popular among our musical virtuosos. (https://www. .britannica.com/art/conservatory-musical-institution) Among Philippine universities, besides colleges, the University of the Philippines, University of Santo Tomas, Silliman University, University of Filipino Women, University St. Paul, Adventist University (Silang Cavite), University of San Agustin, and Liceo de Cagayan University maintain music conservatories.

Pedagogy of music education. In a broad sense, the pedagogy of music education refers to “all practical, application-oriented, as well as scholarly endeavors aimed at teaching and instruction.” That being so, music teachers focus their music education classes on making learners know, understand, and perform all of the musical areas covered in the respective K-12 music education curricula. (Google, August 1, 2019) Although engagement in music education may not be a route to a professional career in music, music education in the Philippines aims to develop in students an “appreciation, participation, enthusiasm and a sustained curiosity for music, to benefit from their musical experiences through active involvement as creators, performers and listeners of music from a wide range of styles, traditions and cultures.” (https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teaching resources/discipline/arts/Pages/QMEF.aspx)

Teresita Tanhueco-Tumapon, PhD, one of the Philippines’ most accomplished educators and experts in the management of higher education institutions, studied at top universities in the Philippines and in Germany, Britain and Japan. She has held senior academic positions at Xavier University, Ateneo de Cagayan; was appointed by the president after EDSA 1986 to standardize campus operations at state institutions and served 17 years later as president of SUC. She is the director of the internationalization office and a lecturer at the Liceo University of Cagayan. Awards include the CHEd Lifetime Professional Achievement Award, the British Council Valuable Services Recognition Award, the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Ministry of Education Award for his initiatives as a pioneer member of the Philippine Teacher Education Council.

E-mail: [email protected]


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Beth Rivar Slusher of Give A Note on Equity in Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 14:51:08 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Where you grew up and where you live now. I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside […]]]>
Where you grew up and where you live now.

I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside of Indianapolis.

Your first musical memory.

Singing in the cherub choir at church when I was 4, and our family gathered around the piano to sing together at home.

Your first gig.

My first big gig was Elton John, he blew my mind!

Your favorite bands/musicians.

Elton John – his unparalleled ability with lyrics and music that made his songs resonate so deeply with his audience. Master musician and showman!

Chris Stapleton – an amazing raw talent who shows true gratitude to his fans.

Jennifer Hudson – her incredible voice and artistry for knowing when to belt her and when not to. Few people can navigate a song’s styling like she can!

How do you get your music these days.

Streaming—mainly Spotify.

Your favorite place to see a concert.

Intimate places with emerging artists. Nothing better than seeing someone before they become a household name and knowing they will!

Your favorite music video.

I loved and admired all of Michael Jackson’s videos, especially “Billy Jean” and “Thriller”. He had an incredible talent for weaving history through music, dance, costume, and drama. His attention to detail showed in every aspect of every video.

Your favorite music-focused TV show and/or podcast.

The Voice for a music-focused TV show. I’m not much of a podcaster.

A recent project you are proud of.

The pandemic has upended the music education programs in our schools. Many students, especially those from historically marginalized communities, were unable to participate in their school music programs simply because they could not afford the music-specific PPE that was needed. to play. And music is often the only reason some of these kids go to school every day. I’m extremely proud that Give A Note established the Let’s Play Music Fund during this time, providing over 13,000 specialized PPE, helping over 7,000 students from 86 schools in 18 states get back into the music classroom to play. Our mission is deeply rooted in creating equitable access and participation in music education, and while this was outside of our normal grant funding programs, it was exactly what teachers and the students needed – a way to bring the group together!

Someone else’s project you admired recently.

Last November, the Fisk Jubilee Singers celebrated their 150th anniversary with a benefit concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. One of Give A Note’s board members, Eric Holt, was on the organizing committee that produced the show. It was a remarkable tribute to the history of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, their contribution to music and to the city of Nashville and raised more than $1.5 million to secure an endowment for the sustainability of the organization. It was an impressive show of talent, history and philanthropy, all rolled into one incredible package!

How musicians should approach working with brands.

Musicians have a unique opportunity when working with a brand to change and expand the audience of for-profit and non-profit brands. The impact affects both the musician and the brand – and hopefully in a positive way. They need to have the endgame in sight when deciding if/when they want to line up on that mark.

How brands should approach working with musicians.

It’s the same idea in terms of knowing the endgame in advance. Brands should apply when they have a clear strategy on how much impact they want the musician to have on their brand, and know what benefits it will also create for the musician.

What music can do that nothing else can.

Music always makes us feel something, and often in a deeply profound way.

What you would be doing if you weren’t in the music business.

Marketing and advertising. I like the idea of ​​collaborating with others to create something that could change the way people think.

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Violinist Ezinma launches nonprofit to make music education accessible https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:34:26 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported. The classical music genre […]]]>

Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported.

The classical music genre has always been dominated by white men. Research shows that less than 2% of instrumentalists in American orchestras are black. For Ezinma, a classically trained musician who has collaborated with artists like Stevie Wonder, Kendrick Lamar and SZA—his journey in the industry is deeper than the music. With every performance, viral video and chord, the artist – whose work sits at the intersection of classical and hip-hop – strives to inspire individuals who don’t often see themselves reflected in space to challenge the status quo and follow their dreams.

She recently launched Strings by Heart; an organization designed to make music education accessible to young people in underserved communities. Through the non-profit organization, young people will have the opportunity to participate in music lessons led by accomplished educators, attend cultural events that will broaden their perspectives, and have access to quality instruments and supplies. . The program was created to use music as a vehicle to teach young people lessons they can apply in other areas of their lives.

Ezinma says her own coming-of-age experiences inspired her to start the foundation. “I remember the isolation I felt as the only black person in the orchestra, sometimes discouraged by my teachers from pursuing my dreams,” she shared in a statement, according to the outlet. “Yet the statistics clearly show that music education plays a vital role in helping children and young adults get on the path to achieving their goals, improving self-esteem and more. children of all backgrounds and communities deserve the chance to experience the joy of classical music and feel like they belong in this world, and what better genre than hip-hop to introduce young minds to the vast potential classical music?” She recently stopped by local Harlem schools to encourage children to join the program.

Although studies have shown that music programs are linked to better academic results, arts education initiatives are often suppressed or non-existent in underfunded schools; illustrating the need for programs like Strings by Heart.

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The music education program empowers students to have a positive influence on future musicians https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-music-education-program-empowers-students-to-have-a-positive-influence-on-future-musicians/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 13:59:16 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-music-education-program-empowers-students-to-have-a-positive-influence-on-future-musicians/ Music education is a profession that many seem to overlook. However, Olla native Daniel Wesson knew early on that his path would involve sharing the love of music with students. “I grew up in a family of musicians. My grandfather was a band manager, and during high school that seemed like the way to go,” […]]]>

Music education is a profession that many seem to overlook. However, Olla native Daniel Wesson knew early on that his path would involve sharing the love of music with students.

“I grew up in a family of musicians. My grandfather was a band manager, and during high school that seemed like the way to go,” Wesson said. “I also appreciated the way the director of my high school orchestra, Mr. Herb Bassett, treated his students. I realized that I wanted to be that kind of influence for someone else, not only teaching them the love of music, but also being a mentor and guiding them.

Throughout his life, Wesson was constantly supported by his family but especially by his grandfather, James Lee Carroll.

“He always included me in every musical thing he did. I was 6 years old and it was a Christmas parade in Olla,” Wesson said. “I asked him if I could walk with the band , and I can’t believe he said yes, but he took one of those little toy drums and his belt and made me a little scarf. He put me there next to the drummers, and I can honestly say that’s probably what started me on the path I’m on now.

The COVID-19 pandemic has complicated things for music education majors. Many schools weren’t allowed to have a band at all, and so many rules had to be changed for music majors and those involved in music.

“Indoor rehearsals have pretty much become non-existent,” Wesson said. “Making a band virtually is next to impossible, so the music world definitely took a hit when the lockdown happened. It put a damper on not being able to rehearse like we wanted to and then space out the phase effects, like being able to be on time with someone who is in the set.

However, Wesson said the music world has learned to adapt to the changes of the pandemic and made a lot of good innovations with special masks and cowbells for musicians.

“The hardest thing is not being able to play with people. I have a lot of methods lessons where I have to learn all the instruments, but with COVID these had to be very spread out and individualized rather than in group,” Wesson said.

Wesson has no regrets about deciding to major in music. For him, the best thing about being a music education student is the friends he made at Louisiana Tech.

“As a freshman I was very antisocial, but going into sophomore year I forced myself to make connections and friendships not only with other music majors, but also with other music majors. other musicians. To have these people in my life who are not just my friends but also my colleagues has been really special,” Wesson said.

After graduating, Wesson plans to teach high school harmony and mentor the next generation of musicians.

“I like rookie groups and more power for people who can do it, but that’s not for me,” Wesson said. “I want to be in a high school band, preferably a school size 3A or 4A. Once there, I just want to get the ball rolling. Not necessarily going in and changing the way things are done, but at least being able to build on what’s already there and hopefully improve the group they have.

Wesson hopes to put his own personality on as a band manager the same way his grandfather and band manager did in high school — and positively impact the next generation of musicians.

This story was written by communications major Leslee Bennett.

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Bienen School of Music Music Education Program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 06:36:28 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Podcast (nu-declassified): Listen in a new window | To download Subscribe: Spotify | Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music […]]]>

Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music teachers.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

FELIX GARKISCH: People have this stereotype of a music major. It’s like, “Oh, they don’t have to do much. All they have to do is practice their instrument or they don’t have to do any real work,” which I think is right — totally, completely wrong.

ERICA SCHMITT: It was Felix Garkisch, a freshman in the music education program at the Bienen School of Music. Félix’s main instrument is the violin.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

ERICA SCHMITT: While some Bienen students plan to play their instrument professionally, others, like Felix, strive to become teachers themselves.

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. This is NU Declassified, a look at how the Wildcats thrive and survive in Northwestern. I don’t know much about Bienen, but I always thought music was a really cool field to study at university. So, in this episode, I spoke to students and faculty in the music education program about the unique opportunities and challenges of the major. Felix said the music education major is slightly different from other Bienen majors.

FELIX GARKISCH: We have a lot of courses that we have to take by the time we graduate not only for our teaching students but also to get our teaching license. So it’s like all the other music majors. I would say that our courses are more academic, in general. There are certainly other practical or performance-based courses, like the various methods courses that I have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha Hussain is a freshman pursuing a dual degree in Music Education and Chemistry. One of the first classes she took in the music education program was Music Education 260-0, or Introduction to Music Education.

RISHA HUSSAIN: We will visit many middle schools, high schools and elementary schools in Chicago, and observe the teachers and their different styles. Teachers who are more active, teachers who let the children take the lead more, and we write a lot of observational reports and we discuss in class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha said she learned a lot about different teaching styles in her class.

RISHA HUSSAIN: In terms of teaching, we talk a lot about the types of teachers there are, so we’ll be playing with teachers who let the students do whatever they want. We call it a musical playground. So you don’t leave anything forbidden, like you sit on the floor with your children, if they are sitting on a carpet instead of standing on top of them. As body language is something we talked about a lot.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he liked the small classes in the music education program.

FELIX GARKISCH: Most of my teachers are really, really, really approachable. And that also means that even during class, they can see what your progress looks like, so even if you’re late or something, they can really, really, really easily help you out.

ERICA SCHMITT: For Risha, the program’s small size creates a sense of community and cohesiveness.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I feel like my teachers actually know me, which I guess feels a bit more like high school, at least for the standard high school experience where you have these consistent teachers. Like, if I take theory for two years, and it’s like I have this little tight-knit group of people because you usually take the same amount of time. And it’s as if you were part of the same group. And so you get to make a friend, and you feel comfortable around everyone. And then you don’t feel weird asking questions and stuff like that. It’s really nice to sit in there.

ERICA SCHMITT: In these classes, students must learn many different instruments as well as vocal and musical composition in order to prepare for the teaching environment. But on top of that, students also specialize in a specific instrument – ​​or voice.

RISHA HUSSAIN: So we have to take classes like percussion and strings and woodwinds to get used to the music that might be taught in an elementary school. And then you come into your concentration later.

ERICA SCHMITT: The music education program also offers three different paths for students to choose from: General Music Education, Instrumental Music Education, and Choral Music Education. Felix said the general track prepares students to –

FELIX GARKISCH: Entering an elementary or middle school class (and) teaching a music class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Félix pursues the instrumental music track.

FELIX GARKISH: This usually involves a band or orchestra, but it can extend to other things as well. Like, I know, some music teachers who run guitar lessons or also like music production lessons. So it’s not like the traditional stuff. There are so many things, it’s so open. And it’s really like, I can shape it however I want, which I think is really cool.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha is on the choir track.

RISHA HUSSAIN: The person who had the most impact on me was my choirmaster. And just kind of watching her watch all these kids grow up and teach and use music as a vehicle to not only talk about you know, music is pretty, but it can be a vehicle to inform a wider audience about things like social justice, and it can bring awareness to many things.

ERICA SCHMITT: Like Risha, Felix said he –

FELIX GARKISCH: Really, really admired my high school music teacher. And the experience I had in that class made me think, “Okay, I want to be able to give this to my own students one day.” So music education seems like the right choice for me.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: All music education majors must participate in a student teaching program, where they often work with certified Northwestern teachers. Each student works with two mentors during their teaching. To find out more about this, I spoke with Professor Stevi Marks, the student-teacher and assessment coordinator at Bienen.

STEVI BRANDS: So, to get a license in the state of Illinois, you must have completed all levels of prerequisite training. So that means let’s say, Erica, you came to me and said, “Man, I’m really interested, I want a high school experience.” But I love elementary kids, I’d like to be, you know, run an elementary program where I first introduce the kids to the instruments and then maybe rehearse them in middle school and then have an experience in high school. So I would be looking for something like that.

ERICA SCHMITT: Teacher mentors guide education majors through the teaching process in a hands-on environment. Marks said she matches students with mentors based on a variety of factors, asking questions like –

STEVI BRANDS: Who can we match you with that will work well for you? And do you have a car or do you rely on public transport? What kind of experiences do you want? Do you want a marching band? Do you want a mariachi? Do you want to work with a show choir or do you want to help direct the musical? We try to match our students with a position that will benefit them and really, really take them to another level as a teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he had a student teacher for his high school music program.

FELIX GARKISCH: I remember she was a music education student in the North West and she was a phenomenal teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Although the music education program is full of opportunities, it can be a heavy workload. For some dual degree students, the program can last five years.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I think mine is a bit heavier, because I have a four-year plan instead of a five-year plan but I’m, I was at 5.8 units right now. And the rest of my plan is around 6.3 to 6.8 units per quarter. And most of it is Bienen.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said the program has made some changes to its curriculum over the past few years to ease the workload for students.

STEVI BRANDS: We know that music education students have to take more credits than I think almost anyone across the University. So we were looking for ways to consolidate some of these courses. And so I incorporated some of the technical things about singing into my choral methods course, which all students have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: I asked Félix about his experience with the workload in music education classes.

FELIX GARKISCH: I mean, I love them. But they are designed to be difficult. And I appreciate that. It’s not like you can browse them all, you have to put in the effort to get a quality product out of it.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said that ultimately her goal is to motivate students to remain passionate about teaching students as she always has been.

STEVI BRANDS: Music education offers every child the opportunity to express themselves in a way that they will not find in any other discipline. And so that’s the most valid pursuit. And we need great music teachers and I’m proud to serve in that capacity. It scares me, Erica, it’s a big responsibility. These fabulous young adults are going to come out and they’re going to have their own classroom. And God willing, they’re going to make a difference like someone did in their life, a positive difference. And that’s what I think about every time I go to class.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. Thanks for listening to another episode of NU: Declassified. This episode was reported and produced by me. The Daily Northwestern’s Audio Editor is Will Clark, Digital Editor is Jordan Mangi, and Managing Editor is Isabelle Sarraf. Be sure to subscribe to The Daily Northwestern podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or SoundCloud to hear more episodes like this.

[music]

E-mail: [email protected]
Twitter: @eschmitt318

Related stories:
– Captured: Bienen’s fall concert series marks the return to in-person performances
— In Focus: Diversifying classical music through education
— NU Declassified: A Day at the Opera

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Savannah Music Stores Aim To Give Students A Quality Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:25:55 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ [ad_1] Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat. It often starts with […]]]>


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Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat.

It often starts with that decision in elementary school where students have the option of choosing an after-school program, such as a band or orchestra, which often continues through high school. In this journey it is common to see the relationship and collaboration between students, group programs and music stores that champion music education.

The legacy of Portman’s Music Superstore

Portman Music Superstore, a longtime Savannah staple, has an intimate relationship with group programs across the Southeast. Founded in 1936 by Ben Portman, Portman’s has been instrumental in the development of band and orchestral programs in the region. Jerry Portman, son of Ben Portman, currently owns the store and his wife Myra oversees the office. He said that prior to his and his father’s involvement in schools in the early 1950s, there were little or no band programs in the public school system and private schools in Savannah-Chatham County.

“My dad got a call from a few musical instrument companies that make instruments, and they said, ‘If we sent you horns in August, would you give them to the kids in the school marching band? beginner? And then whatever you don’t rent, send it back to us in October, and we can calculate the payment for the horns that have been rented. That’s how he officially got into the business, ”explained Jerry Portman. “He and I helped start music programs in schools that had never had music programs before. “

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Portman’s has other locations in Albany, Augusta and Brunswick and rents instruments to thousands of students each year. They also offer full repairs and music lessons with 45 qualified instructors. They laid the groundwork for the group programs students participate in today and, at the forefront, they emphasize the importance of music education.

16-year-old Anne Ou takes piano lessons with instructor Hannah Wong at Portman's Music Superstore on Abercorn Street.

“We are proud to have done this for 85 years. We created it. We are still going strong. We are dedicated to music education. We are doing everything we can, ”said Myra Portman.

Guitar and Music & Arts Center

Students and parents alike looking for places to rent and purchase instruments don’t have to look far. On the same street as Portman’s, Abercorn is lined with two other stores that emphasize the importance of music education: Guitar Center and its subsidiary Music & Arts, the two retail chains, they claim, provide the largest selection of instruments in the United States.

The Music & Arts storefront located at 7805 Abercorn St., Suite 20A.

“Music education is what it all comes down to at the end of the day,” said Mike Marra, Retail District Manager for Music & Arts. “We can offer students the opportunity to explore a new art and give them a platform to express themselves. Music education has been proven to increase test scores and academic ability. For us to bring that into this community, that’s who we all are.

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Both stores also offer private and group musical instrument lessons with qualified instructors, rentals and repairs, contributing to the many choices available to students in acquiring a quality music education.

The Guitar Center showcase located at 7700 Abercorn St.

Guitar Center opened on the lot next to Portman’s in November 2021. Music & Arts opened across the street in April 2021; However, said Marra, prior to the physical establishment, Music & Arts had worked in partnership with directors of local bands and orchestras for more than six years, helping students choose the instruments that were best for them.

“A big part of educating and maintaining music is about getting kids interested. And we provide services that help these principals go into elementary schools and reach out and motivate these people to try and get started so that we can continue to bring music to life in schools, ”said Marra.

Music during the pandemic

Like many businesses, the pandemic has affected the operation of these music stores. Guitar Center and Music & Arts offer virtual lessons, and Portman’s installed an air purification system to make lessons safer for educators and students.

Rodney Gerido is a 52-year-old tank top who started taking guitar lessons with instructor Lee Cheek at Portman's Music Superstore in January 2021.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed operations, music education has persisted, from children to adults.

Following:Not a Record: Local Savannah Record Stores on Vinyl Sales and Popularity Increase

Jerry Portman said when people started to come back, it wasn’t the kids who came through the doors first, but more adults.

Studies have shown that music helps people get through the pandemic, which is evident in trends such as increased sales of musical vinyls since 2020 and increased sales of guitars. According to a study by Fender YouGov, nearly 16 million people have taken back the guitar since the COVID-19 pandemic.

A wall of guitars at the Savannah Guitar Center.  Will Bryant, chief executive, said there was an increase in the number of people wanting to learn to play the guitar during the pandemic.

“There was certainly a great deal of interest in people looking to buy a new instrument, whether it was a seasoned musician who has been playing drums for years, who perhaps wanted to get into the guitar.” , said Will Bryant, Managing Director of Savannah Guitar. Center. “We’ve also had a lot of people who were just looking for a hobby to take their time while they’re stuck at home. And a lot of people kind of look to the guitar for that because so many people would come and say that they wanted to learn to play guitar for years and years and years. Now that they are kind of forced to take that free time, it has given them the opportunity to follow that passion. ”

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

The stores also make an effort to supply musical instruments to other organizations in Savannah. Friends of Ben Tucker Inc., the charity honoring jazz great Ben Tucker, partners with Portman’s to provide musical instruments to underprivileged children in the Savannah area, and Music & Arts has partnered with Savannah Jazz to sponsor the 2021 festival master classes.

For a city like Savannah that is teeming with music, music stores are providing the next generation with the tools to acquire a quality music education.

“It just means the music is always popular. The groups will be there forever. School music will be here forever, ”said Myra Portman.

Laura Nwogu is the Quality of Life reporter for Savannah Morning News. Contact her at lnwogu@gannett.com. Twitter: @lauranwogu_

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D’Addario Foundation awards $ 487,500 for music education programs | New https://russjohnsonmusic.com/daddario-foundation-awards-487500-for-music-education-programs-new/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/daddario-foundation-awards-487500-for-music-education-programs-new/ [ad_1] In an effort to help facilitate music for social change at the community and local level, the D’Addario Foundation has awarded $ 487,500 to music education programs in the United States and Canada. The funds are used both as monetary grants and product grants to enable organizations to continue their education and community programs […]]]>


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In an effort to help facilitate music for social change at the community and local level, the D’Addario Foundation has awarded $ 487,500 to music education programs in the United States and Canada.

The funds are used both as monetary grants and product grants to enable organizations to continue their education and community programs after the hardships of last year. Funding has been awarded to organizations that provide opportunities for historically under-represented BIPOC students (black, native and colored) in classical music, music mentoring programs, immersive music education in schools, as well as percussion-oriented programming.

“A grant like this means that kids who may never have thought of music before have the chance to participate in something meaningful,” says Tom Gariepy of the Boys & Girls Club of St. Lucie County, an organization that provides local children with a safe place and an engaging learning environment. He continues: “The days when children received weekly music lessons in their schools – especially at-risk children in underserved neighborhoods – seem long gone. We try to take over, and [the] the grant will help us do that.

The D’Addario Foundation finds, funds, and partners with local and community organizations to help improve outcomes for marginalized and impoverished children through immersive music education, with the goal of having long-term impact in communities. communities. The foundation runs two rounds of grants per year where nonprofits can apply for support.

Read: The Gateways Music Festival receives $ 800,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Read: Cleveland Orchestra Receives $ 50 Million Grant

Read: “His performance has never been equaled here” – the debut of violinist Joseph White in New York in 1875

To read: Black America: a race for change

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New program promotes music education for Cleveland children https://russjohnsonmusic.com/new-program-promotes-music-education-for-cleveland-children-2/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/new-program-promotes-music-education-for-cleveland-children-2/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 21:37:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/new-program-promotes-music-education-for-cleveland-children-2/ [ad_1] CLEVELAND – Kimberly Shemo is getting ready for one of her favorite times of the day. Shemo is the music program manager of the Northeast Ohio Boys and Girls Clubs. The position allows her to merge her love for children with her passion for music and entertainment. What would you like to know Some […]]]>


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CLEVELAND – Kimberly Shemo is getting ready for one of her favorite times of the day.

Shemo is the music program manager of the Northeast Ohio Boys and Girls Clubs. The position allows her to merge her love for children with her passion for music and entertainment.


What would you like to know

  • Some of Northeast Ohio’s largest musical institutions are working to make music and music education more accessible to children in Cleveland
  • Opening Track Project Brings Music Education Benefits to Boys & Girls Clubs of Northeast Ohio
  • The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and the Cleveland Orchestra offer programming for the program, giving children access to vocal and instrumental training and will be field trip destinations for on-site activities.
  • The Opening Track project was started as a pilot in the Boys & Girls clubs of Cleveland, Akron, Elyria and Sandusky. It is planned to expand to other sites in 2022.

She has been with the Boys & Girls Clubs for nine years and has been a Music Director for three months.

The position was created to help lead a new initiative called the Opening track project. It’s a program designed to incorporate music into virtually any type of activity here at Boys and Girls Clubs.

“What we want to do with Opening Track is teach you how to react holistically and when I say holistically, I mean mentally, don’t I? I mean socio and emotionally, ”Shemo said.

With the help of Shemo, children learn to play and interpret music and understand its benefits.

The lineup of music and the opening track isn’t limited to the walls of the Boys and Girls Club. Opening Track is made possible through a partnership.

Some of Northeast Ohio’s most prominent musical institutions, such as the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Cleveland Orchestra, offer degree programs for the program, giving children access to vocal training. and instrumental and will be field trip destinations for on-site activities.

“It’s always good to give back, but it also shows our youth in these underserved communities that there are people and organizations that care about them,” Shemo said.

Shemo, who has a degree in music, said music education can unleash the potential and purpose of these children, just like it has for her.

“I was one of those kids at one point in my life and I was fortunate and fortunate to have adults who came and believed in me,” she said.

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From the maestro’s office | Turning the energy of the Grammys into an investment in music education | New https://russjohnsonmusic.com/from-the-maestros-office-turning-the-energy-of-the-grammys-into-an-investment-in-music-education-new/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/from-the-maestros-office-turning-the-energy-of-the-grammys-into-an-investment-in-music-education-new/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/from-the-maestros-office-turning-the-energy-of-the-grammys-into-an-investment-in-music-education-new/ [ad_1] How does it feel to win a Grammy? I’ve heard this question a lot lately. The answer is, it’s amazing, and I love that the award is so closely tied to this community. But even as we all celebrate this historic victory, I asked myself, “How can we use this Grammy energy and excitement […]]]>


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How does it feel to win a Grammy?

I’ve heard this question a lot lately. The answer is, it’s amazing, and I love that the award is so closely tied to this community.

But even as we all celebrate this historic victory, I asked myself, “How can we use this Grammy energy and excitement and make it into something that benefits Johnstown?” “

I suggest that we do something important and make a spectacular new investment in music education as a society.

The benefits will be far-reaching and inspiring for our current students in their studies and their lives, for the people whose lives they touch with their game, and for their future, whatever profession they choose for themselves.

I’ve written about the value of sport before. As you may know, I was a varsity athlete in three sports in high school and learned so much from these experiences, as well as those involving music (and I’m very happy to pitch the first pitch for the first time). opening day of the Mill Rats on May 27!).

I am not suggesting that we reduce our support for sport. On the contrary, I propose that we value the arts on a level equal to athletics. The point is that as a country we don’t currently value the arts as much as we do sports – and that’s a problem.

What if we take this moment to become a leader in the country, showing how a rural community can value music and the arts in a way that ends up transforming the future and vibrancy of this whole region?

What I am proposing is to add to what is already working.

An example for the country

The dedicated music teachers in our region do an incredible job every day. They often give lessons in wind and string instruments, while conducting several ensembles, as well as choirs.

Several of them play in the JSO, and others have partnered with us in significant ways over the years. I can’t say enough about each of them and their central role in the fabric of our music community.

Musical theater programs are often vigorous and robust, and we must maintain all that success. But if we choose to be an example to the rest of the country in all the musical opportunities we offer, what will that be like?

Knowing the benefits of teaching strings in particular, is it possible for every high school to have a strong orchestral, orchestral and choir program? Can we ensure that every fourth and fifth grader has access to both string and wind instruments in their schools, and has access to education in school as well as private education if they wish?

What is our vision of the arts in Johnstown?

Now is the time for us to put that vision into motion, and we will be holding conversations and meetings with our local teachers and superintendents over the next few weeks to see what will be possible.

I will encourage all of us to think big, both about what schools are able to deliver and what our partnership can look like.

Once students have gained experience on their instruments, our Johnstown Youth Symphony Orchestra is a fantastic place for children to play, under the expert guidance of David Anderson, and the JSO looks forward to partnering with schools.

The recent transformation grants from the 1889 Foundation and the Alleghenies Community Foundation make me more optimistic than ever about our ability to do this work together.

Jessie Yahner, a dedicated young trombonist and violinist from JSYO who just performed in a workshop with our professional brass musicians last week, wrote about the role of music in her life: “As a human, study and play. music has helped me by giving me something to constantly look forward to, and I have met so many wonderful people through music.

“As a student studying music has helped me develop good habits and skills (time management, hard work, etc.) which can be applied to other tasks / topics unrelated to music. As a citizen, music has helped me get involved in my community by playing in the JSYO and alongside the JSO.

With 12 seniors graduating this year and seven of those entering college as music majors, the JSYO has the opportunity to grow through significant recruitment – and in most cases, the students who audition will have played their own. instruments for several years at school or in private education.

An outlet that changes life

We have seen how the arts bring innovation, creativity, health, joy and economic activity to this region. And as Jessie said so eloquently, for our kids there are more layers to these benefits. The arts are an outlet and a vital and crucial path that changes life.

According to a 2020 report from the Getty Foundation and the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, “Music lessons during childhood correlate with better academic performance and higher IQ scores, even taking into account family income and parent education ”. Another 2019 study surveyed over 100,000 students and found “a clear effect of music lessons on academic performance.”

Studies have consistently shown that music benefits the brain, as well as the mind, and that children who play music are, on average, one level ahead of their peers academically.

They are also less likely to drop out of school and perform better on tests. But more importantly, music provides them with an emotional and social experience at this crucial developmental age when the world around them is a whirlwind of possibilities and confusion. They can better understand their own emotions through the music they play, study and listen to.

Music creates a sense of self, a habit of discipline, and an ability to set and achieve goals that will benefit people throughout their lives.

The Getty report also demonstrated that “teaching and practicing music leads to measurable gains in creativity”.

In our ever-changing world, we need our students to be able to adapt and innovate, and music is one of the best ways to develop that.

Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple, says that “the best engineers, the brightest, the really creative artists who can create a whole new category of product at Apple, they ALWAYS have a solid musical background.”

As an added benefit, playing strings in particular has become one of the best ways to gain admission to our local colleges and receive scholarships.

If we invest more in ropes programs in each of our schools, we would see benefits throughout society.

Paths to success

Together we just won a Grammy. The community has been over the moon. I’m so happy, and I’m so grateful that life has brought me to this place. More than anything, it makes me want other children to have the same opportunities as me.

We envision ways for music to create truly transformational change. If the JSO received a $ 2 million grant to run a music school on Saturdays, we would be able to create a strong program in partnership with our local schools, families and community centers.

And if all the pieces fall into place, I can say this: If every kid in this town and region played an instrument for two or three years, we would see a dramatic change in all kinds of side benefits. Children could play for patients in hospitals. Students could form their own sets. Each church could offer the music of these student musicians to their service, even more than it already does. Weddings and special occasions were celebrated to the sound of string quartets from local high schools.

Your next holiday party might mean hiring the high school jazz band, led by a young conductor who could very well win the next Grammy for Johnstown.

But there are benefits beyond test scores, health, wellness, and the innovation that music brings. There is also an intrinsic value to the experience of playing music. Music heals the soul – it gives voice to the mysteries of love and loss and our search for meaning. It settles us down and inspires us.

Johnstown is a wonderful place to raise a family. We owe it to our children to give them an exemplary arts education as well as to provide excellence in studies and athletics.

Let’s take that Grammy energy and do something really awesome together.

Let’s fund strong string programs, orchestras, bands and choirs in all of our schools, encourage our kids to participate, and start our next Grammy winners on their way right here in Johnstown.

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The importance of music education after Brexit – FE News https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-importance-of-music-education-after-brexit-fe-news/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/the-importance-of-music-education-after-brexit-fe-news/ For many people, thinking about music education brings up memories of being forced to play the recorder in a school assembly hall, a painful experience for both performer and audience. This form of delivery is often uninviting and very few people will walk away from it feeling inspired to develop their musical abilities. Fortunately, music […]]]>

For many people, thinking about music education brings up memories of being forced to play the recorder in a school assembly hall, a painful experience for both performer and audience.

This form of delivery is often uninviting and very few people will walk away from it feeling inspired to develop their musical abilities.

Fortunately, music education has become much more open-minded and diverse, encouraging young learners to discover a range of opportunities and career paths, both on stage and behind the scenes.

It’s beneficial for mental well-being, it’s expressive, creative, enjoyable and it helps to reinforce the importance of working collaboratively and collectively.

The music industry is worth £5.8bn to the UK economy

The music industry contributes £5.8 billion (2019) to the UK economy, employs over 200,000 people and is something most of us are exposed to in our daily lives, either through choice or cognitively. Without music, TV, movies and games for example, there wouldn’t be as much emotion, intensity or suspense.

In films such as “James Bond”, originally composed by John Barry, and more recently by David Arnold, musical motifs are used to remind the audience of places and characters. Without John Williams’ score for the 1975 film based on Peter Benchley’s novel “Jaws,” Steven Spielberg’s career might have been over before it even started (if you haven’t seen that movie, you should watch it and if you have seen it, or when you do, watch the opening scene without sound to experience and realize the importance of the score).

With the increasing development of games, more money has been allocated to the production of audio and supporting music, with the score and audio supporting the action and financially attracting composers and accomplished artists. Music synchronization, used mainly for TV identities, advertising and radio jingles, etc., are mini-compositions that grab the attention of the public and link melodically and/or harmonically with a product or message in a very short time. time. These mini compositions come with their challenges but are equally important and lucrative although they rarely last more than a minute. These are all examples of the less thoughtful musical performance and production possibilities open to students and graduates.

And of course there’s the performance – the “star” of the show, and why so many people are starting to think about a career in music to begin with. Musical performance is something people often associate with popular music (or pop music) and contemporary artists in the many genres they listen to, watch and use in an ever-changing multimedia world.

Musicians and singers can often be considered the “stars” of the show, but there are many other opportunities available in music performance productions, such as dancers, backup singers, and session musicians. Not to mention the team of people who run the show, including sound monitoring, lighting engineers, technicians, costume designers and makeup artists.

All of these people are part of the production in one way or another, and each area helps to communicate and engage more effectively with the audience. Business Support also contains various career opportunities including Managers, A&R, Agents, Songwriters, Merchandise, and Marketing. Basically, when a new artist, band, or DJ is signed, a business is created.

What does Brexit have to do with music?

The recent events of Brexit and the pandemic have had a significant impact on all aspects of the music industry, as on all sectors and industries around the world. The Brexit negotiations did not include live music as promised. This means that the suggested approach to allowing UK musicians and affiliates to perform, tour and work freely in Europe was not discussed or represented.

UK Music and many others in the music industry are calling and pushing for Westminster to reopen negotiations on this. It’s not just for UK-based musicians – the UK was commonly used by international artists as a gateway to Europe. The crew and tour organizers would hire transport and equipment for European tours in the UK.

Prior to Brexit all insurance and equipment was regulated by the EU, unfortunately this is no longer the case, so international artists may reconsider whether they continue to use the UK in this way. These restrictions will have a negative impact on the music industry and the creative arts in general, resulting in less revenue for the economy and less career opportunities for artists and those who support them.

While the current pandemic roadmap for live music is very positive (thanks in large part to the Let Music Play: Save Our Summer 2021 campaign), there are still some questions and issues to be raised. More than three-quarters of people working in the UK music industry are self-employed and have had to reconsider their career choices and future due to the pandemic and Brexit.

Additionally, post-Brexit we will lose some technical support, skills and people due to UK work and travel restrictions. To ensure a successful reopening of live music events, we need people with these skills. Having an open concert hall without sound engineers, lighting engineers, or tech support is basically an empty hall.

How can music education make a difference?

Adapt and overcome; the music industry, and the careers within it, are diverse and offer a multitude of opportunities and experiences. While some people have natural talent, most are not born with these skills, and with an ever-changing landscape and technology, we need to nurture and develop young people (and everyone) through solid education and experiences. We need a permanent pool of talent and skills, as well as realistic, engaging and flexible qualifications that focus on developing practical skills to meet industry needs. First and foremost, we must always place students at the center of development and delivery.

To achieve this, all students must have access to musical instruments and music education must be accessible to all, regardless of age, social and cultural demographics. Campaigns such as Better Provision for Music Education, for example, help to highlight the importance of supply.

The music industry and the educational experience, formal or informal, must be protected and not forgotten. After-school clubs (before and after school) and weekend clubs with a professional approach to delivery and development assessment and feedback are a good place to start. Reference to music terminology and theory built into these programs, but not prescribed, and realistic and engaging projects and performances are what will help them thrive. Education must be enjoyable and contextual for successful skill development. Knowledge, understanding and application with ongoing self-assessment and reflection will inform individual progression and development.

Future skills development

As we move forward, students’ knowledge and understanding of the industry will need to include and adapt to the issues and problems caused by Brexit. For some time, the music business has been a key factor in music education. As technology has changed the way people create, publish and promote themselves and their work, entrepreneurial and creative approaches to reaching global audiences using digital marketing and social media, for example , have become essential. To enable this, qualifications must be flexible in delivery and assessment, work in collaboration with industry and put the student experience at the center of every decision.

The UAL Awarding Body (UAL) Music Performance and Production qualifications have been developed to be adaptive and flexible to meet the needs of students, both academically and practically. The development process behind UAL qualifications includes the involvement of industry representatives and the encouragement of creative projects that are realistic and provide the skills needed to succeed, adapt and succeed.

UAL Awarding Body continues to develop industry relationships and recently became the first awarding body to be accepted as a member of the Music Academic Partnership (MAP). This new partnership with UK Music will provide UAL Awarding Body with access to research and resources to inform future qualifications development.

Another key area that needs to be integrated into education and projects is the new requirements for working in Europe after Brexit. Engaging with PRS for Music and the Musicians Union (MU) for information and support material is where students (and existing professionals in the music industry) should be directed.

The Flowchart Guide to Working in Europe published by MU is a visual guide to when and what is needed and contains important information about touring and performing in Europe.

This knowledge and understanding is what people working in the UK music industry today need to ensure they are prepared for change and have the confidence to step into the ‘new’ world.

Andy Sankey, Chief Examiner for Music Performance and Production, University of the Arts London Awarding Body

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