music programs – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png music programs – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Beth Rivar Slusher of Give A Note on Equity in Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 14:51:08 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Where you grew up and where you live now. I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside […]]]>
Where you grew up and where you live now.

I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside of Indianapolis.

Your first musical memory.

Singing in the cherub choir at church when I was 4, and our family gathered around the piano to sing together at home.

Your first gig.

My first big gig was Elton John, he blew my mind!

Your favorite bands/musicians.

Elton John – his unparalleled ability with lyrics and music that made his songs resonate so deeply with his audience. Master musician and showman!

Chris Stapleton – an amazing raw talent who shows true gratitude to his fans.

Jennifer Hudson – her incredible voice and artistry for knowing when to belt her and when not to. Few people can navigate a song’s styling like she can!

How do you get your music these days.

Streaming—mainly Spotify.

Your favorite place to see a concert.

Intimate places with emerging artists. Nothing better than seeing someone before they become a household name and knowing they will!

Your favorite music video.

I loved and admired all of Michael Jackson’s videos, especially “Billy Jean” and “Thriller”. He had an incredible talent for weaving history through music, dance, costume, and drama. His attention to detail showed in every aspect of every video.

Your favorite music-focused TV show and/or podcast.

The Voice for a music-focused TV show. I’m not much of a podcaster.

A recent project you are proud of.

The pandemic has upended the music education programs in our schools. Many students, especially those from historically marginalized communities, were unable to participate in their school music programs simply because they could not afford the music-specific PPE that was needed. to play. And music is often the only reason some of these kids go to school every day. I’m extremely proud that Give A Note established the Let’s Play Music Fund during this time, providing over 13,000 specialized PPE, helping over 7,000 students from 86 schools in 18 states get back into the music classroom to play. Our mission is deeply rooted in creating equitable access and participation in music education, and while this was outside of our normal grant funding programs, it was exactly what teachers and the students needed – a way to bring the group together!

Someone else’s project you admired recently.

Last November, the Fisk Jubilee Singers celebrated their 150th anniversary with a benefit concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. One of Give A Note’s board members, Eric Holt, was on the organizing committee that produced the show. It was a remarkable tribute to the history of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, their contribution to music and to the city of Nashville and raised more than $1.5 million to secure an endowment for the sustainability of the organization. It was an impressive show of talent, history and philanthropy, all rolled into one incredible package!

How musicians should approach working with brands.

Musicians have a unique opportunity when working with a brand to change and expand the audience of for-profit and non-profit brands. The impact affects both the musician and the brand – and hopefully in a positive way. They need to have the endgame in sight when deciding if/when they want to line up on that mark.

How brands should approach working with musicians.

It’s the same idea in terms of knowing the endgame in advance. Brands should apply when they have a clear strategy on how much impact they want the musician to have on their brand, and know what benefits it will also create for the musician.

What music can do that nothing else can.

Music always makes us feel something, and often in a deeply profound way.

What you would be doing if you weren’t in the music business.

Marketing and advertising. I like the idea of ​​collaborating with others to create something that could change the way people think.

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Violinist Ezinma launches nonprofit to make music education accessible https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 20:34:26 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/violinist-ezinma-launches-nonprofit-to-make-music-education-accessible/ Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported. The classical music genre […]]]>

Ffrom the streets of New York to the Coachella stage alongside the singer Beyonceviolinist Ezinma used his artistry to change the narrative around representation in classical music. The Nebraska native introduces young people from underrepresented groups to the art form through the creation of her Strings by Heart Foundation, ABC7 reported.

The classical music genre has always been dominated by white men. Research shows that less than 2% of instrumentalists in American orchestras are black. For Ezinma, a classically trained musician who has collaborated with artists like Stevie Wonder, Kendrick Lamar and SZA—his journey in the industry is deeper than the music. With every performance, viral video and chord, the artist – whose work sits at the intersection of classical and hip-hop – strives to inspire individuals who don’t often see themselves reflected in space to challenge the status quo and follow their dreams.

She recently launched Strings by Heart; an organization designed to make music education accessible to young people in underserved communities. Through the non-profit organization, young people will have the opportunity to participate in music lessons led by accomplished educators, attend cultural events that will broaden their perspectives, and have access to quality instruments and supplies. . The program was created to use music as a vehicle to teach young people lessons they can apply in other areas of their lives.

Ezinma says her own coming-of-age experiences inspired her to start the foundation. “I remember the isolation I felt as the only black person in the orchestra, sometimes discouraged by my teachers from pursuing my dreams,” she shared in a statement, according to the outlet. “Yet the statistics clearly show that music education plays a vital role in helping children and young adults get on the path to achieving their goals, improving self-esteem and more. children of all backgrounds and communities deserve the chance to experience the joy of classical music and feel like they belong in this world, and what better genre than hip-hop to introduce young minds to the vast potential classical music?” She recently stopped by local Harlem schools to encourage children to join the program.

Although studies have shown that music programs are linked to better academic results, arts education initiatives are often suppressed or non-existent in underfunded schools; illustrating the need for programs like Strings by Heart.

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10 photographs

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Canadian research project reveals stark inequalities in music education across our country https://russjohnsonmusic.com/canadian-research-project-reveals-stark-inequalities-in-music-education-across-our-country/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/canadian-research-project-reveals-stark-inequalities-in-music-education-across-our-country/ Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)? » — Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director, TORONTO, ON, CANADA, Feb. 28, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The report, Everything is Connected: A Music Education Landscape, was led by the Coalition […]]]>
Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)? »

— Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director,

TORONTO, ON, CANADA, Feb. 28, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The report, Everything is Connected: A Music Education Landscape, was led by the Coalition for Music Education in Canada in partnership with others organizations including MusiCounts, Music Canada, Canadian Association of Music Educators, People for Education and the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning.

The principal investigator was Dr. Adam Con from the University of Victoria with assistance from Dr. Betty Anne Younker and Kyle Zavitz from Western University.

The objective of this study was to map the current structural, economic and social ecosystem that influences music education in Canada and to provide baseline data that can be used to inform future investigations.

Launched before the pandemic in 2019, the study was not designed to describe music education, but rather to reflect the current situation within provincial education systems. Acknowledging the demise of music education through the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic over the past two years, the report is hailed as an important expert resource for those developing education policy and rebuilding cohesive and valued music programming in the basic program.

The report exposes large inequities across jurisdictions, noting that in many cases children in the same school district, or even adjacent schools, have different access to music education. The report raises many issues of concern. For example, why do some schools dedicate one period per week to teaching music while others have three? Why do some schools offer access to a variety of instruments while others lack even basic equipment? Why do some jurisdictions have specialist music teachers and others instead rely on the classroom teacher to deliver the music curriculum?

Some of the key findings of the report highlight:

● Inequalities in music education curriculum requirements across the country.

● Inconsistent access to music education and resources, including relevant and current curricula, instruments, technology, equipment and materials.

● Gaps in programming based on urban versus rural access.

The Coalition has created provincial infographics showing many results. For example, the authors used Billboard Music’s hit songs as a reference for when each province’s music schedule was last updated. Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)?

Advocating for inclusion, diversity, equity and access, as well as the richness and cultural significance of music education in Canada, we hope this report will serve as a pathway for future policy development and will focus on implementing “policy into practice” in classrooms across the country.

For more information or to read the report, please visit our website. Media can access our media gallery here.

To speak to one of our spokespersons, Dr Eric Favaro (ENG) or David Peretz-Larochelle (ENG/FR) about the report and/or the impact of music education on future generations, please contact : Colleen McCourt, PR & Media Relations, Front Door PR, 705-358-2006, colleen@frontdoorpr.com Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director, Coalition for Music Education in Canada (905) 399-9732 stacey@coalitioncanada.ca

ABOUT THE COALITION FOR MUSIC EDUCATION
The Coalition for Music Education in Canada exists to increase awareness and understanding of the role music education plays in Canadian culture, and to promote the benefits that music education brings to young people.

The Coalition is made up of parents, students, educators, and business and community partners from diverse backgrounds who support music programs in schools and highlight the importance of music education for all young people in Canada.

For more information, visit www.coalitioncanada.ca

Colleen McCourt
Front door PR
+1 705-358-2006
write to us here
Visit us on social media:
Other

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Dayton Public Schools Superintendent Recognized for Supporting Music Education – WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio https://russjohnsonmusic.com/dayton-public-schools-superintendent-recognized-for-supporting-music-education-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 01:48:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/dayton-public-schools-superintendent-recognized-for-supporting-music-education-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ DAYTON — Dayton Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has received the Save The Music Foundation Award for her outstanding support of music education. The award recognizes a national school district superintendent or superintendent who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to restoring music education in their school district. In a statement, Lolli said she was honored that the […]]]>

DAYTON — Dayton Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli has received the Save The Music Foundation Award for her outstanding support of music education.

The award recognizes a national school district superintendent or superintendent who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to restoring music education in their school district.

In a statement, Lolli said she was honored that the district’s efforts were recognized.

“Giving students the opportunity to actively play instruments, sing, and participate in other aspects of music education is truly invaluable to their overall success,” Lolli said in a statement.

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In 2019, Save the Music and Dayton Public Schools partnered to launch a district-wide music education program.

“Superintendent Lolli has been a champion of music education for all students in Dayton,” said Jaclyn Rudderow, senior director of school programs for Save The Music Foundation, in a statement.

In the three districts where Lolli previously worked, she also increased funding and support for band, choir, general music programs and professional staff development, according to a statement.

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Santa Barbara Education Foundation, 99.9 KTYD Instrumental in Local Music Education | School zone https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 18:05:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Posted on February 1, 2022 | 10:05 a.m. Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments. The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a […]]]>

Posted on February 1, 2022
| 10:05 a.m.

Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments.

The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a rarity for California school districts.

In recent years, SBEF staff and local music education advocates have taken to the airwaves on 99.9 KTYD to ask for community support.

During last year’s Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, SBEF provided $30,000 in funding and 60 donated instruments, including Indian string instruments, accordions, cellos and a piccolo that will go straight into the hands students in SB Unified music programs.

With so much hanging around the annual event, SBEF will once again join 99.9 KTYD for the entire month of February for the Keep the Beat Instrument Drive. The on-air event will serve as an outreach and celebration for SB Unified student musicians.

“We are always amazed at how our community comes together to support students with the gift of music,” said SBEF Executive Director Margie Yahyavi. “This is a huge victory for our students.

“In addition to the problem-solving and cooperative learning skills gained from playing music, having a creative outlet can be a huge benefit for a child, especially during this difficult time,”

The month-long radio event will feature SB Unified music teachers and local professional musicians taking to the airwaves to rally community support for music education at local public schools.

This year’s guests include George Pendergast of Dishwalla, Dylan Aguilera, music and band director of Santa Barbara High School, and Rick Boller of the Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation.

SBEF will also host a contactless instrument donation site from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday in February at its offices, 1330 State St. Instrument donations are also accepted at Nick Rail Music at 2801 De La Vina Street.

Do you have an instrument that collects dust? Donate your used instruments to put them directly into the hands of a student through a local school music program.

For more information about Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, visit keepthebeatsb.org or call 805-284-9125.

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Long Island Music Hall of Fame announces 2021 Music Education of Note Award winner https://russjohnsonmusic.com/long-island-music-hall-of-fame-announces-2021-music-education-of-note-award-winner/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 14:11:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/long-island-music-hall-of-fame-announces-2021-music-education-of-note-award-winner/ [ad_1] The Long Island Music Hall of Fame has announced the recipient of the 2021 Music Educator of Note award, Kim Löwenborg-Coyne. LIMHOF presents the award to those who do outstanding work in Long Island music education. Long Island Music Hall Music Educator of Note award recipient – Kim Löwenborg-Coyne. Dr. Löwenborg-Coyne was born in […]]]>


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The Long Island Music Hall of Fame has announced the recipient of the 2021 Music Educator of Note award, Kim Löwenborg-Coyne. LIMHOF presents the award to those who do outstanding work in Long Island music education.

Long Island Music Hall Music Educator of Note award recipient РKim L̦wenborg-Coyne.

Dr. Löwenborg-Coyne was born in Lynbrook, NY. She obtained a bachelor’s degree in musical performance and also a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Molloy College. She also holds a master’s degree in musicology and a doctorate. in NYU Senior Music Education.

In 1996 she started teaching in Rockville Center Schools and became the director of art and music programs for Babylon of the North. She has also performed at Carnegie Hall as an accompanist for the NBHS Choir.

Long Island Music Prize

In 2008, Dr Löwenborg-Coyne raised funds for Pierre Dulaine’s ballroom dance program in Long Island. She also tried to bring culturally diverse residency programs to North Babylon. She ensured that all the kids got quality instruments, amazing technology, and world music education.

Dr. Kim never takes no for an answer when it comes to the children of North Babylon!

Superintendent of Schools Kim Skillen

Dr. Löwenborg-Coyne is deeply honored to receive the award, alongside her husband and two children.

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Savannah Music Stores Aim To Give Students A Quality Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:25:55 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ [ad_1] Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat. It often starts with […]]]>


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Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat.

It often starts with that decision in elementary school where students have the option of choosing an after-school program, such as a band or orchestra, which often continues through high school. In this journey it is common to see the relationship and collaboration between students, group programs and music stores that champion music education.

The legacy of Portman’s Music Superstore

Portman Music Superstore, a longtime Savannah staple, has an intimate relationship with group programs across the Southeast. Founded in 1936 by Ben Portman, Portman’s has been instrumental in the development of band and orchestral programs in the region. Jerry Portman, son of Ben Portman, currently owns the store and his wife Myra oversees the office. He said that prior to his and his father’s involvement in schools in the early 1950s, there were little or no band programs in the public school system and private schools in Savannah-Chatham County.

“My dad got a call from a few musical instrument companies that make instruments, and they said, ‘If we sent you horns in August, would you give them to the kids in the school marching band? beginner? And then whatever you don’t rent, send it back to us in October, and we can calculate the payment for the horns that have been rented. That’s how he officially got into the business, ”explained Jerry Portman. “He and I helped start music programs in schools that had never had music programs before. “

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

Portman’s has other locations in Albany, Augusta and Brunswick and rents instruments to thousands of students each year. They also offer full repairs and music lessons with 45 qualified instructors. They laid the groundwork for the group programs students participate in today and, at the forefront, they emphasize the importance of music education.

16-year-old Anne Ou takes piano lessons with instructor Hannah Wong at Portman's Music Superstore on Abercorn Street.

“We are proud to have done this for 85 years. We created it. We are still going strong. We are dedicated to music education. We are doing everything we can, ”said Myra Portman.

Guitar and Music & Arts Center

Students and parents alike looking for places to rent and purchase instruments don’t have to look far. On the same street as Portman’s, Abercorn is lined with two other stores that emphasize the importance of music education: Guitar Center and its subsidiary Music & Arts, the two retail chains, they claim, provide the largest selection of instruments in the United States.

The Music & Arts storefront located at 7805 Abercorn St., Suite 20A.

“Music education is what it all comes down to at the end of the day,” said Mike Marra, Retail District Manager for Music & Arts. “We can offer students the opportunity to explore a new art and give them a platform to express themselves. Music education has been proven to increase test scores and academic ability. For us to bring that into this community, that’s who we all are.

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Both stores also offer private and group musical instrument lessons with qualified instructors, rentals and repairs, contributing to the many choices available to students in acquiring a quality music education.

The Guitar Center showcase located at 7700 Abercorn St.

Guitar Center opened on the lot next to Portman’s in November 2021. Music & Arts opened across the street in April 2021; However, said Marra, prior to the physical establishment, Music & Arts had worked in partnership with directors of local bands and orchestras for more than six years, helping students choose the instruments that were best for them.

“A big part of educating and maintaining music is about getting kids interested. And we provide services that help these principals go into elementary schools and reach out and motivate these people to try and get started so that we can continue to bring music to life in schools, ”said Marra.

Music during the pandemic

Like many businesses, the pandemic has affected the operation of these music stores. Guitar Center and Music & Arts offer virtual lessons, and Portman’s installed an air purification system to make lessons safer for educators and students.

Rodney Gerido is a 52-year-old tank top who started taking guitar lessons with instructor Lee Cheek at Portman's Music Superstore in January 2021.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed operations, music education has persisted, from children to adults.

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Jerry Portman said when people started to come back, it wasn’t the kids who came through the doors first, but more adults.

Studies have shown that music helps people get through the pandemic, which is evident in trends such as increased sales of musical vinyls since 2020 and increased sales of guitars. According to a study by Fender YouGov, nearly 16 million people have taken back the guitar since the COVID-19 pandemic.

A wall of guitars at the Savannah Guitar Center.  Will Bryant, chief executive, said there was an increase in the number of people wanting to learn to play the guitar during the pandemic.

“There was certainly a great deal of interest in people looking to buy a new instrument, whether it was a seasoned musician who has been playing drums for years, who perhaps wanted to get into the guitar.” , said Will Bryant, Managing Director of Savannah Guitar. Center. “We’ve also had a lot of people who were just looking for a hobby to take their time while they’re stuck at home. And a lot of people kind of look to the guitar for that because so many people would come and say that they wanted to learn to play guitar for years and years and years. Now that they are kind of forced to take that free time, it has given them the opportunity to follow that passion. ”

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

The stores also make an effort to supply musical instruments to other organizations in Savannah. Friends of Ben Tucker Inc., the charity honoring jazz great Ben Tucker, partners with Portman’s to provide musical instruments to underprivileged children in the Savannah area, and Music & Arts has partnered with Savannah Jazz to sponsor the 2021 festival master classes.

For a city like Savannah that is teeming with music, music stores are providing the next generation with the tools to acquire a quality music education.

“It just means the music is always popular. The groups will be there forever. School music will be here forever, ”said Myra Portman.

Laura Nwogu is the Quality of Life reporter for Savannah Morning News. Contact her at lnwogu@gannett.com. Twitter: @lauranwogu_

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Meyer influenced dozens of students during his career in teaching music https://russjohnsonmusic.com/meyer-influenced-dozens-of-students-during-his-career-in-teaching-music/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 10:06:37 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/meyer-influenced-dozens-of-students-during-his-career-in-teaching-music/ [ad_1] Small in stature but a titan in spirit, Beverly Meyer has created a notable legacy through music education programs in several school districts. Although she is now retired, her rowdy nature continues to be felt in many communities through her volunteerism and charity, seeking to ensure that future generations remain proud of their schools’ […]]]>


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Small in stature but a titan in spirit, Beverly Meyer has created a notable legacy through music education programs in several school districts.

Although she is now retired, her rowdy nature continues to be felt in many communities through her volunteerism and charity, seeking to ensure that future generations remain proud of their schools’ sports and music programs.

Born and raised on her parents’ farm in High Point, Meyer not only learned to adopt the farming lifestyle at a young age, but also worked many hours in the JF Tising & Sons store founded by her great-great -dad.

“It was a general store that opened in 1874,” she recalls. “I was 12 when I started working there, sweeping floors, stocking shelves, giving change for customers and candling eggs.”

Coming from what she described as a “musical family,” Meyer took piano lessons from a woman who lived across the street while participating in gospel singing groups as a child. Additionally, while attending High Point One-Class School, she and her fellow students received an introductory level of music education from their teacher.

“There has never been a time when I haven’t had music in my life,” she said.

After completing her eighth year at High Point, she transferred to California High School and graduated in 1957. Hanging on to an interest in teaching music, she enrolled at Central Missouri State College. in Warrensburg.

“My aunts went to college and my grandfather went there when it was the (state) normal school,” Meyer said.

Meyer received her BA in Music Education in 1961. In the fall of that year, she was hired as a vocal and instrument instructor for premiere at 12th at Green Ridge R-8 southwest of Sedalia.

She stayed there for the next 12 years, leading the choir and girls’ club, achieving the highest mark out of 23 schools participating in a competition. In 1972, she married John Meyer, with whom she had attended school at High Point, and the couple moved to Mid-Missouri.

“For three years, I taught half a day at High Point and a half day at Versailles,” she said. “It was a very busy time because we were trying to build a house, and I also worked in my father’s store and gave piano lessons.

“In 1975 I had to go to Russellville to pay for a house, and while I was in the area I stopped by school to see if they needed help. I spoke to the secretary about Grover Snead, who was the superintendent at the time, and I told him I was interested in teaching. “

The next day, Meyer got a call from Superintendent Snead, who told her he had a contract waiting for her if she was still interested in a teaching position.

Over the next quarter century, his musical education for elementary grades included developing programs for PTO, Thanksgiving, and Christmas reunions in addition to assisting in the production of the Robin Hood musical. In 1999, her choir was invited to sing for a Christmas dinner at the Governor’s Mansion, where she received a proclamation signed by Governor Mel Carnahan.

“We had a lot of fun in our classes,” said Meyer. “We even went into limbo and learned to dance square.”

Years earlier, in 1990, she made the decision to close her father’s store, realizing that she couldn’t both manage it and stay focused on her full-time job as an educator.

After retiring from Russellville in 2000, Meyer continued to teach part-time for three years at the Latham School. Well-deserved recognition came in 2006, when she was one of six educators – including three from Russellville – selected as Missouri’s “educational pioneers”. Sadly, the joy at these accolades was tempered by the death of her husband, John, in 2009.

For years she lived on her family’s farm, which earned the distinction of being a “Missouri Century Farm”. She made the decision to sell her father’s store in 2016; However, his family’s legacy in the community is supported by Meyer’s generosity towards musical and sports initiatives.

“One of my greatest pleasures is volunteering to help the Russellville Choir,” she said. “In 2014, the choir got a ‘1’ in the competition, which it had not done since 1966.”

With a smile, she added, “In 1966 my sister was the teacher, so that’s an interesting connection.”

Meyer continued, “I also enjoy playing the piano at school events like the program they have for Veterans Day. Also, I sell tickets to the Russellville ball games and see a lot of my alumni that way.

In recent years, his philanthropic spirit has manifested itself in the purchase of pianos for schools in High Point, Russellville, Latham and California. His generosity also includes donations made towards the purchase of the Russellville High School marquee, orchestra uniforms and printed mascot signs for the school gymnasium.

Although she and her late husband never had children, Meyer acknowledges that her career in education, along with her volunteer efforts, has brought her a family numbering in the thousands.

“I heard from several alumni who ended up becoming music teachers,” she said. “I guess that might be a clue that I was a good teacher who influenced other people’s lives… something that I just love.

“And although I’ve never had kids, I know I really have around 10,000 because of all these kids I’ve taught over the years, and that’s pretty special to me.” Meyer added.

Jeremy P. Ämick writes on behalf of the Silver Star Families of America.

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A game changer for music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 00:22:42 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ [ad_1] Reading time: 4 minutes The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional […]]]>


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Reading time: 4 minutes

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional musicians, but will also lead to better academic performance and student well-being.

Through Amadeus’ Music Education Program, 33,000 students in Sydney’s 150 Catholic schools will benefit from a quality music education, including learning to play a musical instrument by early 2024.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said the program builds on the great tradition of music education in Catholic education, with benefits extending far beyond the curriculum. music itself.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus. “

“There is a strong correlation between excellent musical progress in schools and better academic performance in reading, writing, arithmetic and analytical skills. So this was a time when we could put it all together and create a huge opportunity for all the students in our system, ”he said.

The program offers students in-class music lessons, ensemble lessons and small group lessons and will be led by more than 80 classroom music teachers and 270 specialist music teachers.

Tutors bring with them professional experience of orchestras and ensembles across Australia and the world, with strong program support from the Sydney Youth Orchestra, Sydney Conservatory of Music and Opera Australia. .

Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre” width=”808″ height=”488″ srcset=”https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4.jpg 808w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-300×181.jpg 300w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-768×464.jpg 768w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-696×420.jpg 696w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-695×420.jpg 695w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-600×362.jpg 600w” sizes=”(max-width: 808px) 100vw, 808px”/>
Students of the Amadeus Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large,” said Opera Australia Artistic Director Lyndon Terracini.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus.”

The program started with a successful pilot project involving 13 schools in the Auburn-Lakemba network.

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case, and even show up for the tutorials on time.

One of the schools involved, Holy Spirit College mixed secondary school in Lakemba, said it was already reaping the rewards.

Principal Phillip Scollard said this has helped to dramatically expand access to music education for students from all socio-economic backgrounds.

“With our 7 years, even though it’s been up for a year, we can see that it really helps them engage in their learning more effectively, including better focus. Music is not a cheap business and therefore a program like this is also a real social leveler, ”he said.

Grade 7 student Elyssia Deeb started playing the transverse flute and said she had benefited greatly from the Amadeus program.

“It also helped me improve my memory because I have to remember all the notes. It gives everyone the opportunity to play musical instruments that we might not have otherwise been able to access. It’s a wonderful program and we get constant support and guidance from our music teachers, ”she said.

His classmate John-Paul Sukkar also had a very positive experience learning to play the viola.

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large. “

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case and even show up for the tutorials on time, ”he said.

The Creative and Performing Arts Coordinator at Holy Spirit College Ms Emma Hughes said the Amadeus program is starting to unlock many previously untapped musical talents among students.

“They never had the experience of playing the flute or the cello or anything and some students never even knew these instruments existed,” she explained.

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program.  Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools
The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

“So it has been very exciting to unlock these abilities that you would never have known existed without this program.”

Head of St John Vianney Elementary School in Greenacre, Mr. Justin Coupland said classes in the program had moved online during the recent lockdown, but face-to-face tutoring would resume soon.

“COVID embarrassed a bit, which made face-to-face teaching quite difficult, but tutors continued to post online through Google Classroom,” he said.

“As our grade 3 students start and enter high school, we’ll see the music programs evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary school, but particularly in high schools…”

Thanks to the program, students in grades 3 to 8 will have access to 52,000 different instruments by 2024 and in-class music lessons will begin in kindergarten.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said it would have many long-term benefits.

“As we have our grade 3 students starting and entering high school, we will see the music curricula evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary, but especially in high schools, we will have students who have benefited from four years of practice, working in ensembles and bands which will then enter our high schools with real confidence and will greatly contribute to the music programs of our schools, ”he added.

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Ottawa Musicians Call for Return of Music Education to the Classroom https://russjohnsonmusic.com/ottawa-musicians-call-for-return-of-music-education-to-the-classroom/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/ottawa-musicians-call-for-return-of-music-education-to-the-classroom/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 16:43:52 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/ottawa-musicians-call-for-return-of-music-education-to-the-classroom/ [ad_1] OTTAWA – Local artists put on a big show in front of Ottawa City Hall Thursday night to celebrate Music Education Day. Over 100 musicians performed together in harmony for the special concert. The music exhibit was made up of music teachers and members of the National Arts Center Orchestra who came together to […]]]>


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OTTAWA – Local artists put on a big show in front of Ottawa City Hall Thursday night to celebrate Music Education Day.

Over 100 musicians performed together in harmony for the special concert.

The music exhibit was made up of music teachers and members of the National Arts Center Orchestra who came together to perform Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah in support of children’s music education.

Organizer Jeannie Hunter says the pandemic has forced programs in the city’s schools to close and those that remain active have been drastically reduced.

“A lot of fear of playing wind instruments means a lot of wind instruments have disappeared from many schools,” Hunter explained. “He closed music programs and children’s access to music programs.”

For tubist and student Jason Steed, that means rehearsing outside.

“It’s not the same experience as practicing or performing together in an ensemble on stage, in the classroom,” he said.

For Olivia Messy, the lessons were virtual.

“I would really love to go to class,” she said.

“They lose their focus and interest quickly. At least in the classroom, they’re focused.” said Messy’s mother, Raquel.

As COVID-19 vaccination rates in Ottawa continue to rise and with protocols in place, Hunter says now is the time to bring music education back to classrooms

“Mask the person and mask the instrument,” said Hunter, who is also a music teacher at the Ottawa Carleton District School Board. “We wanted to show people what PPE looks like for a musical instrument so that when we talk about it, we can imagine what. We have to move on and give back to children what makes them happy. “

For Steed, a Canterbury High School student who follows the music curriculum, that means finding solutions to move the music indoors before the winter months and hope that will change the tone of music in the classroom.

“It’s about how can we not why can’t we,” Steed said.

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