music teachers – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png music teachers – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Beginnings of music education in the Philippines https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:10:18 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us […]]]>

TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us a lot of loneliness, mental health threats, anxiety, stress and depression. Faced with this experience and faithful to faith in the goodness of our Heavenly Father, we turn to music to find the comfort we need. Given this, we are finding better ways to teach music education online.

History of ancient musical education. Three different contexts provide the context for music education in the Philippines. Music education can be provided to a community within the framework of a people’s culture. Another framework is a country’s basic youth education and a third is a college program that could lead to a professional career in music education or music performance. (Borromeo nd). Reminiscent of its beginnings, formal music education in the Philippines dates back to the 1500s when Spanish colonizers introduced Western music to the islands. “Solfege, vocalization and composition” were part of the actual musical training taught in schools “established by Church missionaries and music teachers” (Del Valle nd). As in any tradition, music education in the Philippines has seen relative changes with respect to curriculum content and structure. (https://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp › files › public › Mr.)

Mid-years. The Music Education Act of Republic Act (RA) 4723 passed in 1966 provided for the teaching of music and art as a separate subject at the elementary level and the teaching of music once a week for one hour at the secondary level (Yamzon, 1972). The second RA 5523 enacted in 1968 benefited music education by creating various school division positions providing for ten (10) music supervisory positions in ten school divisions of the former Public Schools Office. With the publication of the revised primary school curriculum of 1970, music and the arts were treated as separate subjects allocating 3 days a week to music and 2 days to the arts. The initial implementation of the aforementioned laws firmly entrenched music in the curriculum of public and private schools across the country (https://ncca.gov.ph ›… › Music)

21st century. Major changes in the K-12 reforms introduced music as a regular subject from grades 1-10 and the introduction in high school of the arts and design stream which serves as a preparation stream for future careers in higher music education. (https://www.semanticscholar.org › article › Music-Education…). Music education pedagogy aimed at teaching learners the basic concepts and processes in music, to appreciate, analyze and perform for the personal development of the learner, to understand the main characteristics of Philippine music and art and of the world. This pedagogy sought to inculcate the celebration of Filipino cultural identity and diversity and the expansion of the learner’s worldview. (https://www.academia.edu › K_to_.12_Curriculum_Gui..) A bachelor’s degree in education, usually majoring in MAPEH and graduating with a master’s degree in music education, must pass the teacher’s license exam to be officially a teacher of music.

Music conservatories. Students wishing to study music performance instead enroll in a performance and composition section of a music department more formally labeled as a music conservatory. In addition to honing students in musical composition, a conservatory teaches students to perform, such as playing musical instruments and singing. The Britannica informs that the term “conservatory” is derived from the “Italian conservatorio”. In the Middle Ages “choral schools were attached to churches”. “Music in medieval universities was a theoretical subject comparable to mathematics) as in the Ospedale della Pietà, founded in 1346 in Venice. Then came the Renaissance during which the Conservatorio made its debut. This term Conservatorio “designated a type of orphanage often attached to a hospital.” “The foundlings (conservati) received musical instruction at state expense. Naples was the center for the boys and Venice for the girls. Thus, we can consider that “the conservatori were the first secular institutions equipped for training in practical music. “The Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo (founded 1589, Naples) trained or had as faculty members most of the leading Italian opera composers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.” From the Britannica we learn that the first secular school of music for students founded in Paris in 1784 “was reorganized and renamed Conservatoire National de Musique et d’Art Dramatique in 1795 by the National Convention (the Revolutionary regime of 1792-1795). Throughout the 19th century, the French model was copied, with modifications, in Europe and the United States.” Of these conservatories, the Juilliard School seems to be popular among our musical virtuosos. (https://www. .britannica.com/art/conservatory-musical-institution) Among Philippine universities, besides colleges, the University of the Philippines, University of Santo Tomas, Silliman University, University of Filipino Women, University St. Paul, Adventist University (Silang Cavite), University of San Agustin, and Liceo de Cagayan University maintain music conservatories.

Pedagogy of music education. In a broad sense, the pedagogy of music education refers to “all practical, application-oriented, as well as scholarly endeavors aimed at teaching and instruction.” That being so, music teachers focus their music education classes on making learners know, understand, and perform all of the musical areas covered in the respective K-12 music education curricula. (Google, August 1, 2019) Although engagement in music education may not be a route to a professional career in music, music education in the Philippines aims to develop in students an “appreciation, participation, enthusiasm and a sustained curiosity for music, to benefit from their musical experiences through active involvement as creators, performers and listeners of music from a wide range of styles, traditions and cultures.” (https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teaching resources/discipline/arts/Pages/QMEF.aspx)

Teresita Tanhueco-Tumapon, PhD, one of the Philippines’ most accomplished educators and experts in the management of higher education institutions, studied at top universities in the Philippines and in Germany, Britain and Japan. She has held senior academic positions at Xavier University, Ateneo de Cagayan; was appointed by the president after EDSA 1986 to standardize campus operations at state institutions and served 17 years later as president of SUC. She is the director of the internationalization office and a lecturer at the Liceo University of Cagayan. Awards include the CHEd Lifetime Professional Achievement Award, the British Council Valuable Services Recognition Award, the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Ministry of Education Award for his initiatives as a pioneer member of the Philippine Teacher Education Council.

E-mail: [email protected]


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Canadian research project reveals stark inequalities in music education across our country https://russjohnsonmusic.com/canadian-research-project-reveals-stark-inequalities-in-music-education-across-our-country/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 17:21:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/canadian-research-project-reveals-stark-inequalities-in-music-education-across-our-country/ Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)? » — Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director, TORONTO, ON, CANADA, Feb. 28, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The report, Everything is Connected: A Music Education Landscape, was led by the Coalition […]]]>
Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)? »

— Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director,

TORONTO, ON, CANADA, Feb. 28, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The report, Everything is Connected: A Music Education Landscape, was led by the Coalition for Music Education in Canada in partnership with others organizations including MusiCounts, Music Canada, Canadian Association of Music Educators, People for Education and the Canadian Network for Arts and Learning.

The principal investigator was Dr. Adam Con from the University of Victoria with assistance from Dr. Betty Anne Younker and Kyle Zavitz from Western University.

The objective of this study was to map the current structural, economic and social ecosystem that influences music education in Canada and to provide baseline data that can be used to inform future investigations.

Launched before the pandemic in 2019, the study was not designed to describe music education, but rather to reflect the current situation within provincial education systems. Acknowledging the demise of music education through the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic over the past two years, the report is hailed as an important expert resource for those developing education policy and rebuilding cohesive and valued music programming in the basic program.

The report exposes large inequities across jurisdictions, noting that in many cases children in the same school district, or even adjacent schools, have different access to music education. The report raises many issues of concern. For example, why do some schools dedicate one period per week to teaching music while others have three? Why do some schools offer access to a variety of instruments while others lack even basic equipment? Why do some jurisdictions have specialist music teachers and others instead rely on the classroom teacher to deliver the music curriculum?

Some of the key findings of the report highlight:

● Inequalities in music education curriculum requirements across the country.

● Inconsistent access to music education and resources, including relevant and current curricula, instruments, technology, equipment and materials.

● Gaps in programming based on urban versus rural access.

The Coalition has created provincial infographics showing many results. For example, the authors used Billboard Music’s hit songs as a reference for when each province’s music schedule was last updated. Would you be surprised to learn that one of our largest provinces last updated its primary music program the year B52’s Love Shack was a hit (1989)?

Advocating for inclusion, diversity, equity and access, as well as the richness and cultural significance of music education in Canada, we hope this report will serve as a pathway for future policy development and will focus on implementing “policy into practice” in classrooms across the country.

For more information or to read the report, please visit our website. Media can access our media gallery here.

To speak to one of our spokespersons, Dr Eric Favaro (ENG) or David Peretz-Larochelle (ENG/FR) about the report and/or the impact of music education on future generations, please contact : Colleen McCourt, PR & Media Relations, Front Door PR, 705-358-2006, colleen@frontdoorpr.com Stacey Sinclair, Executive Director, Coalition for Music Education in Canada (905) 399-9732 stacey@coalitioncanada.ca

ABOUT THE COALITION FOR MUSIC EDUCATION
The Coalition for Music Education in Canada exists to increase awareness and understanding of the role music education plays in Canadian culture, and to promote the benefits that music education brings to young people.

The Coalition is made up of parents, students, educators, and business and community partners from diverse backgrounds who support music programs in schools and highlight the importance of music education for all young people in Canada.

For more information, visit www.coalitioncanada.ca

Colleen McCourt
Front door PR
+1 705-358-2006
write to us here
Visit us on social media:
Other

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VCU alum takes an alternative approach to music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/vcu-alum-takes-an-alternative-approach-to-music-education/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 15:01:32 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/vcu-alum-takes-an-alternative-approach-to-music-education/ Artwork by Tess Wladar Zahra Ndirangu, Contributing author Students in Nicolas Léonard’s class learn the basics of music through games, well-known songs and sensory methods. Leonard, a VCU Music Education alumnus and Chesterfield County teacher, uses the Kodály method to teach music in an alternative way. The Kodály method focuses on kinesthetic learning. Kinesthesia is […]]]>
Artwork by Tess Wladar

Zahra Ndirangu, Contributing author

Students in Nicolas Léonard’s class learn the basics of music through games, well-known songs and sensory methods.

Leonard, a VCU Music Education alumnus and Chesterfield County teacher, uses the Kodály method to teach music in an alternative way. The Kodály method focuses on kinesthetic learning. Kinesthesia is a sensory experience derived from the feeling of being aware of the movements and position of one’s body, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary.

Hungarian composer Zoltan Kodaly developed the Kodaly method in the middle of the 20th century and focuses on growing a child’s musical abilities by “meeting the child where they are,” according to Ginger Albertson, president-elect of the Virginia Organization for Kodály Educators.

“It’s very child-centered,” Albertson said. “It’s very developmentally appropriate for children and it’s important that we have fun.”

The Kodály Method differs from traditional music education in that it focuses on teaching music education in a way that makes sense to children. This is achieved through games and a focus on music the child already knows, according to Leonard.

“We approach it kinesthetically,” Leonard said. “They are actively doing something related to music.”

Leonard said the Kodály approach also involves teaching children music in their native language and emphasizing traditional folk music from other countries. The diversity among his students at Greenfield Elementary School facilitates this aspect of Kodály’s approach, according to Leonard.

“We live in the United States, so I’m going to teach a lot of these traditional American folk songs from centuries ago that we use as a base,” Leonard said. “However, for every American folk song I use, I also add a song from another country. It’s something that’s really close to my heart because we have such diversity in Greenfield.

VCU Music Education alumnus Nicolas Leonard uses the Kodály Method to teach music in an alternative way in Chesterfield County. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Léonard

Leonard was determined to attend a school outside of Richmond and pursue a major outside of music, as his parents were both music teachers. Initially, he didn’t want to follow in their footsteps, he said.

Leonard attended Christopher Newport University with a communications major, but said he soon realized he wanted to pursue his passion for music in college. He changed his major to music performance and later earned a degree in clarinet performance, according to Leonard.

Leonard said he went to VCU for his master’s degree in music education, which shaped the course of his career as an educator and musician. He was later introduced to Kodály through the program, according to Leonard.

“Through VCU, I shaped who I wanted to be as an educator,” Leonard said. “We talked about the good, the bad and the ugly. They don’t coat anything. Similar to Kodály, it was just a very complete experience overall.

Leonard said he was introduced to the Kodály method by his music education teacher at VCU, Alice Hammel, who urged him to get his Kodály certification before his first year of teaching.

Leonard said he initially chose to start teaching music in a more traditional way, but quickly discovered that this style of teaching was “not his favorite thing.” He took a two-year hiatus from teaching, then returned the following year with his Kodály certification and a renewed love for music education, according to Leonard.

“I passed my first level and I thought ‘this is exactly what I want to do,'” Leonard said. “It just spoke to me.”

Leonard currently uses the Kodály approach with his students from kindergarten through sixth grade. The teaching method builds on itself, making teaching and lesson plans concrete for each grade level, according to Leonard.

“I know exactly what order I want to teach things in,” Leonard said. “It’s a bit like a skyscraper. In early childhood, they come to me and we first build a solid foundation and with each grade level they progress. We scaffold and build things based on what they already know.

The approach consists of many different tactics, such as focusing on the singing voice and increasing musical literacy, according to VOKE president Ashley Cuthbertson.

“The idea that the voice is our primary instrument because we all have it and everyone has a right to music is something that really touches every aspect of my professional teaching career,” Cuthbertson said.

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Bienen School of Music Music Education Program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 06:36:28 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Podcast (nu-declassified): Listen in a new window | To download Subscribe: Spotify | Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music […]]]>

Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music teachers.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

FELIX GARKISCH: People have this stereotype of a music major. It’s like, “Oh, they don’t have to do much. All they have to do is practice their instrument or they don’t have to do any real work,” which I think is right — totally, completely wrong.

ERICA SCHMITT: It was Felix Garkisch, a freshman in the music education program at the Bienen School of Music. Félix’s main instrument is the violin.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

ERICA SCHMITT: While some Bienen students plan to play their instrument professionally, others, like Felix, strive to become teachers themselves.

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. This is NU Declassified, a look at how the Wildcats thrive and survive in Northwestern. I don’t know much about Bienen, but I always thought music was a really cool field to study at university. So, in this episode, I spoke to students and faculty in the music education program about the unique opportunities and challenges of the major. Felix said the music education major is slightly different from other Bienen majors.

FELIX GARKISCH: We have a lot of courses that we have to take by the time we graduate not only for our teaching students but also to get our teaching license. So it’s like all the other music majors. I would say that our courses are more academic, in general. There are certainly other practical or performance-based courses, like the various methods courses that I have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha Hussain is a freshman pursuing a dual degree in Music Education and Chemistry. One of the first classes she took in the music education program was Music Education 260-0, or Introduction to Music Education.

RISHA HUSSAIN: We will visit many middle schools, high schools and elementary schools in Chicago, and observe the teachers and their different styles. Teachers who are more active, teachers who let the children take the lead more, and we write a lot of observational reports and we discuss in class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha said she learned a lot about different teaching styles in her class.

RISHA HUSSAIN: In terms of teaching, we talk a lot about the types of teachers there are, so we’ll be playing with teachers who let the students do whatever they want. We call it a musical playground. So you don’t leave anything forbidden, like you sit on the floor with your children, if they are sitting on a carpet instead of standing on top of them. As body language is something we talked about a lot.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he liked the small classes in the music education program.

FELIX GARKISCH: Most of my teachers are really, really, really approachable. And that also means that even during class, they can see what your progress looks like, so even if you’re late or something, they can really, really, really easily help you out.

ERICA SCHMITT: For Risha, the program’s small size creates a sense of community and cohesiveness.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I feel like my teachers actually know me, which I guess feels a bit more like high school, at least for the standard high school experience where you have these consistent teachers. Like, if I take theory for two years, and it’s like I have this little tight-knit group of people because you usually take the same amount of time. And it’s as if you were part of the same group. And so you get to make a friend, and you feel comfortable around everyone. And then you don’t feel weird asking questions and stuff like that. It’s really nice to sit in there.

ERICA SCHMITT: In these classes, students must learn many different instruments as well as vocal and musical composition in order to prepare for the teaching environment. But on top of that, students also specialize in a specific instrument – ​​or voice.

RISHA HUSSAIN: So we have to take classes like percussion and strings and woodwinds to get used to the music that might be taught in an elementary school. And then you come into your concentration later.

ERICA SCHMITT: The music education program also offers three different paths for students to choose from: General Music Education, Instrumental Music Education, and Choral Music Education. Felix said the general track prepares students to –

FELIX GARKISCH: Entering an elementary or middle school class (and) teaching a music class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Félix pursues the instrumental music track.

FELIX GARKISH: This usually involves a band or orchestra, but it can extend to other things as well. Like, I know, some music teachers who run guitar lessons or also like music production lessons. So it’s not like the traditional stuff. There are so many things, it’s so open. And it’s really like, I can shape it however I want, which I think is really cool.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha is on the choir track.

RISHA HUSSAIN: The person who had the most impact on me was my choirmaster. And just kind of watching her watch all these kids grow up and teach and use music as a vehicle to not only talk about you know, music is pretty, but it can be a vehicle to inform a wider audience about things like social justice, and it can bring awareness to many things.

ERICA SCHMITT: Like Risha, Felix said he –

FELIX GARKISCH: Really, really admired my high school music teacher. And the experience I had in that class made me think, “Okay, I want to be able to give this to my own students one day.” So music education seems like the right choice for me.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: All music education majors must participate in a student teaching program, where they often work with certified Northwestern teachers. Each student works with two mentors during their teaching. To find out more about this, I spoke with Professor Stevi Marks, the student-teacher and assessment coordinator at Bienen.

STEVI BRANDS: So, to get a license in the state of Illinois, you must have completed all levels of prerequisite training. So that means let’s say, Erica, you came to me and said, “Man, I’m really interested, I want a high school experience.” But I love elementary kids, I’d like to be, you know, run an elementary program where I first introduce the kids to the instruments and then maybe rehearse them in middle school and then have an experience in high school. So I would be looking for something like that.

ERICA SCHMITT: Teacher mentors guide education majors through the teaching process in a hands-on environment. Marks said she matches students with mentors based on a variety of factors, asking questions like –

STEVI BRANDS: Who can we match you with that will work well for you? And do you have a car or do you rely on public transport? What kind of experiences do you want? Do you want a marching band? Do you want a mariachi? Do you want to work with a show choir or do you want to help direct the musical? We try to match our students with a position that will benefit them and really, really take them to another level as a teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he had a student teacher for his high school music program.

FELIX GARKISCH: I remember she was a music education student in the North West and she was a phenomenal teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Although the music education program is full of opportunities, it can be a heavy workload. For some dual degree students, the program can last five years.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I think mine is a bit heavier, because I have a four-year plan instead of a five-year plan but I’m, I was at 5.8 units right now. And the rest of my plan is around 6.3 to 6.8 units per quarter. And most of it is Bienen.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said the program has made some changes to its curriculum over the past few years to ease the workload for students.

STEVI BRANDS: We know that music education students have to take more credits than I think almost anyone across the University. So we were looking for ways to consolidate some of these courses. And so I incorporated some of the technical things about singing into my choral methods course, which all students have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: I asked Félix about his experience with the workload in music education classes.

FELIX GARKISCH: I mean, I love them. But they are designed to be difficult. And I appreciate that. It’s not like you can browse them all, you have to put in the effort to get a quality product out of it.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said that ultimately her goal is to motivate students to remain passionate about teaching students as she always has been.

STEVI BRANDS: Music education offers every child the opportunity to express themselves in a way that they will not find in any other discipline. And so that’s the most valid pursuit. And we need great music teachers and I’m proud to serve in that capacity. It scares me, Erica, it’s a big responsibility. These fabulous young adults are going to come out and they’re going to have their own classroom. And God willing, they’re going to make a difference like someone did in their life, a positive difference. And that’s what I think about every time I go to class.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. Thanks for listening to another episode of NU: Declassified. This episode was reported and produced by me. The Daily Northwestern’s Audio Editor is Will Clark, Digital Editor is Jordan Mangi, and Managing Editor is Isabelle Sarraf. Be sure to subscribe to The Daily Northwestern podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or SoundCloud to hear more episodes like this.

[music]

E-mail: [email protected]
Twitter: @eschmitt318

Related stories:
– Captured: Bienen’s fall concert series marks the return to in-person performances
— In Focus: Diversifying classical music through education
— NU Declassified: A Day at the Opera

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Superintendent Wins Outstanding Administrator Award from Oregon Music Education Association | News https://russjohnsonmusic.com/superintendent-wins-outstanding-administrator-award-from-oregon-music-education-association-news/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/superintendent-wins-outstanding-administrator-award-from-oregon-music-education-association-news/ Dr. Karen Gray is honored to win the Outstanding Administrator Award from the Oregon Music Education Association. The Outstanding Administrator Award is given in recognition of contributions to music education through administrative support. Here is the text read when she received this award on January 16: “Supporting an administrator’s music education is of the utmost […]]]>

Dr. Karen Gray is honored to win the Outstanding Administrator Award from the Oregon Music Education Association. The Outstanding Administrator Award is given in recognition of contributions to music education through administrative support.

Here is the text read when she received this award on January 16:

“Supporting an administrator’s music education is of the utmost importance and something for which we are always grateful. This year’s recipient is a superintendent who, over the past tumultuous years, has not only maintained but strengthened the Lincoln County School District’s music program Prior to the 2020-2021 school year, several schools in the district did not have a music teacher.

“This superintendent has made it his mission to place music teachers in every building in the district and now every student in Lincoln County, K-12, has access to music lessons and a music teacher in his building. It was the first step of many that she took to change the course of the history of music education in Lincoln County. Last year, she contacted music teachers in the district and held regular meetings to discuss how together they could develop music in the district. This included his desire for each area of ​​the county to have a ropes program as well as a five-year plan so that each school had what it needed to be successful.

“After a discussion on how to make the band fair for students regardless of economic status, she secured $300,000 in district funds to purchase instruments so that no student would be turned away because of their circumstances. financial. In addition, the money for the purchase of instruments came from district funds, not from the ESSER (Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief Fund) and is one of the most important investments for music education ever achieved in Lincoln County. She continues to meet monthly with music teachers in her district to support them, their programs, and music students.

In addition to supporting music in her district, this superintendent also supports music in her community as president of the Newport Symphony, actively working to bring professional musicians into the community and into classrooms to work with students. For all you do for your community, your schools, and your music students, we honor Dr. Karen Gray as OMEA 2022 Outstanding Trustee.”

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Alumnus receives $500,000 for music education program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/alumnus-receives-500000-for-music-education-program/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 05:31:38 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/alumnus-receives-500000-for-music-education-program/ The Heartbeat Music Project, which provides music education to Navajo students, is the recipient of the Lewis Prize for Music Accelerator Award Adam McPhail 00h27, February 03, 2022 Six years ago, Ariel Horowitz MUS ’19 ’20 was a junior at Julliard studying violin performance when she learned she had the opportunity to lead a short […]]]>

The Heartbeat Music Project, which provides music education to Navajo students, is the recipient of the Lewis Prize for Music Accelerator Award

Adam McPhail

00h27, February 03, 2022


Six years ago, Ariel Horowitz MUS ’19 ’20 was a junior at Julliard studying violin performance when she learned she had the opportunity to lead a short music education summer camp for Navajo students. In January, she received a $500,000 Accelerator Award from the Lewis Prize for Music for advancing the musical and educational ambitions of the project.

Founded in 2016 by Horowitz and based in Crownpoint, New Mexico, the Heartbeat Music Project, or HMP, provides free music education to students from nearby Navajo communities. Accomplished musicians teach students aged 5 to 19 to play the instruments of their choice. Instructors teach students music theory and encourage them to play traditional Diné, or Navajo melodies and songs.

“The gift we just received from the Lewis Prize is so amazing,” Horowitz said. “There are so many barriers to accessing a music education in a very rural Indigenous community that has historically been oppressed, marginalized and unfunded.”

HMP offers a two-week summer camp and a one-week winter camp. Students receive free transportation to and from home, two meals, and snack breaks.

Music teachers come from a variety of backgrounds. Some come from classical music or jazz departments of schools and conservatories across the country. The other instructors are local and native musicians from the Navajo community.

Although students only participate in the program during the summer and winter, they can keep an instrument at home year-round to practice, thanks to a private donation in early 2021 that enabled HMP to provide students almost all the instruments typically found in a classical orchestra. or jazz band.

“We would like to expand our instrument library even further if we can,” Horowitz said. “Specifically, we’d like to find more non-classical, non-jazz instruments – native instruments too.”

Additionally, the HMP coordinates free virtual lessons when camps are not in session. However, many budding Navajo musicians lack access to a stable internet connection. Some students drive for hours to get free, stable Wi-Fi for virtual music lessons. With the new award, Horowitz and the rest of HMP want to change that and overcome some of the barriers preventing students from pursuing music.

Additionally, the HMP hopes to expand the overall reach of the program. Currently, the HMP can only serve the eastern portion of the Navajo Reservation, located in New Mexico. They would also like to provide students who live further afield in Arizona with access to a music education.

“We want a lot of the money to be spent on student learning,” said Sharon Nelson, HMP executive director and Diné assistant professor of culture, language and leadership at Navajo Technical University. . “We hope to be able to reach other areas of the reservation, including other tribes.”

Along with music lessons, rehearsals and workshops, Nelson, who is Diné herself, teaches students about Diné culture as part of the program. She noticed that many students were disconnected from their grandparents due to language and cultural barriers and wanted to bridge the intergenerational gap and help students connect with their community and culture. Nelson hopes students can combine the skills learned in music lessons with lessons about Diné culture and traditions to crystallize their identity.

“One of the things we want our kids to be is to become holistic,” Nelson said. “We want them to be self-centered and at peace with themselves, so we’re giving them the tools to do that using Navajo cultural teaching.”

The program operates in a tricky intersection. According to HMP Deputy Director Gregory Lewis MUS ’27, Western music has been reserved for wealthy whites for most of its history. Horowitz further noted that Western music was widely disseminated by imperialism – the same structures that have continually oppressed the Navajo people as well as other Indigenous communities in the United States and around the world.

“Early on, Sharon told us that it was really essential that we teach the children to play Diné songs on the instruments and not just Western music,” Lewis said. “She didn’t want them to learn music if it didn’t mean learning their own music and preserving their own culture.”

HMP hopes to recontextualize classical music and help students approach music with new techniques and perspectives. Music, they believe, should not have a hierarchical power structure. Instead, the program tries to give students resources and let them express themselves however they want.

The Lewis Prize for Music seeks to bring about positive social change by funding non-profit organizations to provide high quality music education to students. The Accelerator Award given to HMP is the Lewis Prize for Music’s highest monetary award.

Adam McPhail | adam.mcphail@yale.edu

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Santa Barbara Education Foundation, 99.9 KTYD Instrumental in Local Music Education | School zone https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 18:05:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Posted on February 1, 2022 | 10:05 a.m. Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments. The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a […]]]>

Posted on February 1, 2022
| 10:05 a.m.

Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments.

The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a rarity for California school districts.

In recent years, SBEF staff and local music education advocates have taken to the airwaves on 99.9 KTYD to ask for community support.

During last year’s Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, SBEF provided $30,000 in funding and 60 donated instruments, including Indian string instruments, accordions, cellos and a piccolo that will go straight into the hands students in SB Unified music programs.

With so much hanging around the annual event, SBEF will once again join 99.9 KTYD for the entire month of February for the Keep the Beat Instrument Drive. The on-air event will serve as an outreach and celebration for SB Unified student musicians.

“We are always amazed at how our community comes together to support students with the gift of music,” said SBEF Executive Director Margie Yahyavi. “This is a huge victory for our students.

“In addition to the problem-solving and cooperative learning skills gained from playing music, having a creative outlet can be a huge benefit for a child, especially during this difficult time,”

The month-long radio event will feature SB Unified music teachers and local professional musicians taking to the airwaves to rally community support for music education at local public schools.

This year’s guests include George Pendergast of Dishwalla, Dylan Aguilera, music and band director of Santa Barbara High School, and Rick Boller of the Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation.

SBEF will also host a contactless instrument donation site from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday in February at its offices, 1330 State St. Instrument donations are also accepted at Nick Rail Music at 2801 De La Vina Street.

Do you have an instrument that collects dust? Donate your used instruments to put them directly into the hands of a student through a local school music program.

For more information about Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, visit keepthebeatsb.org or call 805-284-9125.

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Realtimecampaign.com discusses the surprising benefits of online music education for kids https://russjohnsonmusic.com/realtimecampaign-com-discusses-the-surprising-benefits-of-online-music-education-for-kids/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 22:03:07 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/realtimecampaign-com-discusses-the-surprising-benefits-of-online-music-education-for-kids/ At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, most schools went online. Although it has quickly become apparent that having children receive an online-only education can be socially limiting and make it harder for them to stay focused, some subjects are even better taught online, including music education. Read on to find out some of the […]]]>

At the start of the coronavirus pandemic, most schools went online. Although it has quickly become apparent that having children receive an online-only education can be socially limiting and make it harder for them to stay focused, some subjects are even better taught online, including music education. Read on to find out some of the surprising benefits of enrolling kids in online music lessons to see why.

Access to instructors

Not all future musical prodigies live in major metropolitan areas with access to all kinds of teachers, which means many rural and suburban kids miss out on music lessons altogether. The good news is that according to realtimecampaign.com, children growing up in rural areas now have much greater access to all kinds of educational resources, including private and group music lessons. Given that learning to play an instrument has been shown to improve executive function and academic achievement, it cannot be underestimated how helpful this increased access to qualified music teachers can be in leveling the playing field. rules of the game.

Ability to observe practice environment

When students arrive for in-person music lessons, the instructor has no idea what factors may influence their progress. A poor home practice environment can prevent students from making meaningful improvements between classes, but teachers may not recognize this problem when offering classes in studios or classrooms. With online music education, it’s easy for instructors to recognize distractions, misconfiguration, or other environmental issues that could be corrected to get the student back on track.

Ability to save lessons for later review

Some students have trouble remembering what they are supposed to practice. Online music lessons can be recorded, however, meaning forgetful students can go back and watch the part of the video that offers instructions for the week’s homework. Additionally, teachers can also go back and review lessons to identify both strengths and weaknesses in the student’s play.

Affordability of Online Music Lessons

Although the online music education market size is expected to reach $421.9 million by 2027, offering video lessons actually helps keep costs more reasonable for low-income students and their families. Organizations such as Save the Music compile online music education resources and offer a range of music grants to improve disadvantaged students’ access to online and in-person music education.

Fewer missed classes

Students miss weekly classes for a variety of reasons, many of which are discussed on our website. Taking classes online helps remove barriers that might otherwise cause students to jump, including inclement weather, an inconvenient location, or family health issues. Parents don’t need to take time off from busy schedules to drive kids to and from class, and students, themselves, will benefit from having more time due to the elimination of commuting.

Find a program today

Parents can find all the resources they need to help their children learn music online. It doesn’t have to cost a fortune and there are grants to cover the cost of the instruments. Discover the resources available today.

Media Contact
Company Name: realtimecampaign.com
Contact: Media Relations
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Country: United States
Website: realtimecampaign.com

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Music Education students have the fourth highest course load https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-students-have-the-fourth-highest-course-load/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 14:33:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-education-students-have-the-fourth-highest-course-load/ Music Education students take the fourth highest course load at BYU with 93 credit hours and graduate with music and teaching expertise. The music education major gives students a license to teach music in the K-12 classroom. There are four different accents offered at BYU: choir, general music, strings and orchestra. Victoria Dixon and Nathan […]]]>

Music Education students take the fourth highest course load at BYU with 93 credit hours and graduate with music and teaching expertise.

The music education major gives students a license to teach music in the K-12 classroom. There are four different accents offered at BYU: choir, general music, strings and orchestra.

Victoria Dixon and Nathan Seamons celebrate at the end of BYU Wind Symphony’s 2021 Fall Semester Concert on December 9, 2021. Seamons is the Symphony Band’s conductor and a faculty member of the Education Instrumental Ensemble musical. (Photo courtesy of Victoria Dixon)

“I think the most fundamental way to understand this is really that there are two majors involved in this major. You have to be an expert in music and you have to be an expert in teaching,” said music education teacher Paul Broomhead.

Broomhead said his class MUSIC 176: Careers in Music Education is designed to provide a clear picture of what a career in music education is really about. Students use this course to “assess their compatibility with the profession” and determine whether to apply. The class also helps students with the application process.

“Those who decide to apply, I give them a bit of coaching on how to be successful in the application process,” Broomhead said.

According to Broomhead, applying music education is a rigorous process. The app focuses on five areas: Teaching Personality, Musicality, Academics, Teaching Experience, and Leadership Experience.

Students must submit a 10-minute video of themselves teaching four people a musical concept and a video of them playing their main instrument. They must also audition for the studio of their choice. The school then reviews GPA and asks students to write an 800-1000 word essay about their motivation to participate in the music education program. Finally, students must also pass an interview with the faculty.

“We’re really serious about this,” Broomhead said. “We are prepared to invest a lot of time in each candidate in order to know this person as well as possible before deciding whether or not they are admitted to our program.”

The trumpet section of the symphony group celebrates during their end-of-semester concert, “BYU Wind Symphony: Winter Celebration.” Music Education students must audition and be part of the studio of their choice. (Photo courtesy of Victoria Dixon)

Once admitted to the program, music education students share lessons with music performance and education students. They are also required to learn all of the instruments under their teaching umbrella as well as some of the other accents.

“There are a lot of things I need to learn to get this degree,”Victoria Dixon, a BYU junior with an instrumental accent, said. “If BYU took away a required class, they would take away the teaching skills I would need. Although the credits are few, they are very rewarding and it is very useful to have so many.

Spencer Baldwin, a BYU sophomore in choral emphasis, knew he wanted to be a choir teacher since he was in junior high where he participated in orchestra, choir and theater. Although he already has a year under his belt, Baldwin said he will be at BYU for another four years.

“There’s so much to do,” Baldwin said. He said the fun thing about being a music student is you’ll have a classical singing lesson with an expectation of nine hours of practice and a 45 minute lesson, but that only counts as a 1 lesson. .5 credit.

Many courses in the Music Education major are one-credit courses, but require in-class and out-of-class practice time. Baldwin said it can sometimes be difficult to manage all the homework and exercises he has to do throughout the week, but he understands that’s how it is.

Dixon hopes people know how long music teachers have to put in, the time they spend and the dedication it takes. She understands that her major has a bad reputation for being a failing for those “afraid to be an artist” or those who “won’t make money.” For her, however, it is not like that at all.

“Everyone I know in the music education program is there because they love it and because they want to help people and serve people,” Dixon said.

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Long-time Fairfield resident to lead new music education program at the University of the Sacred Heart https://russjohnsonmusic.com/long-time-fairfield-resident-to-lead-new-music-education-program-at-the-university-of-the-sacred-heart/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 23:22:46 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/long-time-fairfield-resident-to-lead-new-music-education-program-at-the-university-of-the-sacred-heart/ FAIRFIELD – The new music education program at the University of the Sacred Heart aims to create a vibrant community of forward-thinking teachers, its director said. Frank Martignetti was recently appointed assistant professor and director of SHU’s new music education program, according to the university. The 42-credit graduate program will begin this summer and the […]]]>

FAIRFIELD – The new music education program at the University of the Sacred Heart aims to create a vibrant community of forward-thinking teachers, its director said.

Frank Martignetti was recently appointed assistant professor and director of SHU’s new music education program, according to the university. The 42-credit graduate program will begin this summer and the undergraduate program will begin in the fall.

Martignetti said the folks at Sacred Heart have wanted to create a major in music for years – both students and faculty. The university has finally succeeded and is investing resources in it. He said he was given a big brushstroke to create a dream program and then hired to lead it.


“I’m really proud of what we’re building here,” he said. “I hope it will host a dynamic cohort of very high quality students, both at the masters and undergraduate level. I hope he has successful teaching students across the North East and that he has a reputation for being truly forward thinking and progressive.

He said he was now working on recruiting, facilities, equipment and personnel for it.

Martignetti, a Fairfield resident from New Rochelle, NY, said he spent 28 years teaching and playing music. He sang in church and school choral groups throughout his life and began working professionally as a church organist and choir director, as well as a music director for community theater productions.

During his career, Martignetti continued in music education – teaching high school students in New Haven. He then headed the music education program at Bridgeport University for nine years and eventually headed the entire music and performing arts department.

SHU’s master’s program in music education lasts one and a half years, while the undergraduate to master’s music program will take five years.

“Our MAT program is for people who have a degree in the field, and who often have significant work experience in the discipline, and now they want to teach it,” he said.

Martignetti said the program is similar to the previous program he oversaw and revitalized at the University of Bridgeport.

“The good thing is that the graduate students who participate in the program are between 22 years old – barely out of undergraduate studies – to 40 or 50 years old,” he said. “It’s a cool mix of adult learners. “

Martignetti said he was not sure how many people would enroll in the graduate program this summer, adding “you are at the point where you have started a new business and you are waiting for the phone to ring.”

He said he wanted the cohort to be small enough that he could give students individual attention, while still being large enough that they could network and learn from each other.

“It’s not supposed to be a huge program, but we don’t want to limit its growth potential either,” he said. “It’s just a strong cohort.”

Adult learners have unique strengths and weaknesses, Martignetti said, so they need individual attention. The teaching certification is broad, covering Kindergarten to Grade 12 and subjects in general music, choir, band, orchestra, technology, and music theory – as well as the wide variety of music. instruments.

“No one can teach all of these things well,” he said. “So it’s about helping students build on those strengths, sharpen their weaknesses, and learn new skills so that they have a few areas where they can be effective. “

Martignetti said there are several post-baccalaureate teacher preparation programs in Connecticut, but the only master’s programs in music education are at Sacred Heart University and Bridgeport University. He said his former students are doing well in the workforce.

“Everyone works,” he says. “Most teaching positions are available in the summer, and a few around Christmas. But, the job market looks pretty good. Unfortunately, some people withdraw from education because they are afraid of contracting COVID. “

Martignetti said there were 18 music teacher positions open in the state on Tuesday – a higher number than normal.

Another aspect of this program will be the relationship the university and its students have with the public schools in Bridgeport, Martignetti said. He said he held workshops with music teachers from Bridgeport and other professional development activities while at BU, and helped the district in other ways. He wants to build this relationship while also managing the SHU program.

“We’re trying to create a unique opportunity where just like the rest of the education programs here, they have the opportunity to enter this teacher’s residence in Bridgeport – where they work with a really good teacher at the schools in Bridgeport. “, did he declare. .

The student would co-teach with this teacher for the entire school year, Martignetti, and then Bridgeport would offer them a job if the graduate agreed to work there for at least three years.

“We want our students to teach in a variety of contexts to find the right context for them,” he said. “We want them to know how to teach all students successfully and well. Creating a good musical program in a neighborhood where the resources are not so good … is a great result.

joshua.labella@hearstmediact.com

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