school music – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 11:11:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png school music – Russ Johnson Music http://russjohnsonmusic.com/ 32 32 Beginnings of music education in the Philippines https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 16:10:18 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beginnings-of-music-education-in-the-philippines/ TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us […]]]>

TWO years ago, we suddenly found ourselves in a new normal. Since then, we have had much reduced social ties. Without assurance that this situation will end, the adverse consequences of lockdowns and mobility restrictions continue in many parts of our country. Although a little less strict in some areas, this situation has caused us a lot of loneliness, mental health threats, anxiety, stress and depression. Faced with this experience and faithful to faith in the goodness of our Heavenly Father, we turn to music to find the comfort we need. Given this, we are finding better ways to teach music education online.

History of ancient musical education. Three different contexts provide the context for music education in the Philippines. Music education can be provided to a community within the framework of a people’s culture. Another framework is a country’s basic youth education and a third is a college program that could lead to a professional career in music education or music performance. (Borromeo nd). Reminiscent of its beginnings, formal music education in the Philippines dates back to the 1500s when Spanish colonizers introduced Western music to the islands. “Solfege, vocalization and composition” were part of the actual musical training taught in schools “established by Church missionaries and music teachers” (Del Valle nd). As in any tradition, music education in the Philippines has seen relative changes with respect to curriculum content and structure. (https://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp › files › public › Mr.)

Mid-years. The Music Education Act of Republic Act (RA) 4723 passed in 1966 provided for the teaching of music and art as a separate subject at the elementary level and the teaching of music once a week for one hour at the secondary level (Yamzon, 1972). The second RA 5523 enacted in 1968 benefited music education by creating various school division positions providing for ten (10) music supervisory positions in ten school divisions of the former Public Schools Office. With the publication of the revised primary school curriculum of 1970, music and the arts were treated as separate subjects allocating 3 days a week to music and 2 days to the arts. The initial implementation of the aforementioned laws firmly entrenched music in the curriculum of public and private schools across the country (https://ncca.gov.ph ›… › Music)

21st century. Major changes in the K-12 reforms introduced music as a regular subject from grades 1-10 and the introduction in high school of the arts and design stream which serves as a preparation stream for future careers in higher music education. (https://www.semanticscholar.org › article › Music-Education…). Music education pedagogy aimed at teaching learners the basic concepts and processes in music, to appreciate, analyze and perform for the personal development of the learner, to understand the main characteristics of Philippine music and art and of the world. This pedagogy sought to inculcate the celebration of Filipino cultural identity and diversity and the expansion of the learner’s worldview. (https://www.academia.edu › K_to_.12_Curriculum_Gui..) A bachelor’s degree in education, usually majoring in MAPEH and graduating with a master’s degree in music education, must pass the teacher’s license exam to be officially a teacher of music.

Music conservatories. Students wishing to study music performance instead enroll in a performance and composition section of a music department more formally labeled as a music conservatory. In addition to honing students in musical composition, a conservatory teaches students to perform, such as playing musical instruments and singing. The Britannica informs that the term “conservatory” is derived from the “Italian conservatorio”. In the Middle Ages “choral schools were attached to churches”. “Music in medieval universities was a theoretical subject comparable to mathematics) as in the Ospedale della Pietà, founded in 1346 in Venice. Then came the Renaissance during which the Conservatorio made its debut. This term Conservatorio “designated a type of orphanage often attached to a hospital.” “The foundlings (conservati) received musical instruction at state expense. Naples was the center for the boys and Venice for the girls. Thus, we can consider that “the conservatori were the first secular institutions equipped for training in practical music. “The Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo (founded 1589, Naples) trained or had as faculty members most of the leading Italian opera composers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.” From the Britannica we learn that the first secular school of music for students founded in Paris in 1784 “was reorganized and renamed Conservatoire National de Musique et d’Art Dramatique in 1795 by the National Convention (the Revolutionary regime of 1792-1795). Throughout the 19th century, the French model was copied, with modifications, in Europe and the United States.” Of these conservatories, the Juilliard School seems to be popular among our musical virtuosos. (https://www. .britannica.com/art/conservatory-musical-institution) Among Philippine universities, besides colleges, the University of the Philippines, University of Santo Tomas, Silliman University, University of Filipino Women, University St. Paul, Adventist University (Silang Cavite), University of San Agustin, and Liceo de Cagayan University maintain music conservatories.

Pedagogy of music education. In a broad sense, the pedagogy of music education refers to “all practical, application-oriented, as well as scholarly endeavors aimed at teaching and instruction.” That being so, music teachers focus their music education classes on making learners know, understand, and perform all of the musical areas covered in the respective K-12 music education curricula. (Google, August 1, 2019) Although engagement in music education may not be a route to a professional career in music, music education in the Philippines aims to develop in students an “appreciation, participation, enthusiasm and a sustained curiosity for music, to benefit from their musical experiences through active involvement as creators, performers and listeners of music from a wide range of styles, traditions and cultures.” (https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teaching resources/discipline/arts/Pages/QMEF.aspx)

Teresita Tanhueco-Tumapon, PhD, one of the Philippines’ most accomplished educators and experts in the management of higher education institutions, studied at top universities in the Philippines and in Germany, Britain and Japan. She has held senior academic positions at Xavier University, Ateneo de Cagayan; was appointed by the president after EDSA 1986 to standardize campus operations at state institutions and served 17 years later as president of SUC. She is the director of the internationalization office and a lecturer at the Liceo University of Cagayan. Awards include the CHEd Lifetime Professional Achievement Award, the British Council Valuable Services Recognition Award, the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, and the Ministry of Education Award for his initiatives as a pioneer member of the Philippine Teacher Education Council.

E-mail: [email protected]


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Beth Rivar Slusher of Give A Note on Equity in Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 14:51:08 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/beth-rivar-slusher-of-give-a-note-on-equity-in-music-education/ Where you grew up and where you live now. I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside […]]]>
Where you grew up and where you live now.

I was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up mostly in Indiana and Michigan. We moved about every four or five years because my dad was a JCPenney store manager and that’s how they did it back then. I live in Noblesville, Indiana now, just outside of Indianapolis.

Your first musical memory.

Singing in the cherub choir at church when I was 4, and our family gathered around the piano to sing together at home.

Your first gig.

My first big gig was Elton John, he blew my mind!

Your favorite bands/musicians.

Elton John – his unparalleled ability with lyrics and music that made his songs resonate so deeply with his audience. Master musician and showman!

Chris Stapleton – an amazing raw talent who shows true gratitude to his fans.

Jennifer Hudson – her incredible voice and artistry for knowing when to belt her and when not to. Few people can navigate a song’s styling like she can!

How do you get your music these days.

Streaming—mainly Spotify.

Your favorite place to see a concert.

Intimate places with emerging artists. Nothing better than seeing someone before they become a household name and knowing they will!

Your favorite music video.

I loved and admired all of Michael Jackson’s videos, especially “Billy Jean” and “Thriller”. He had an incredible talent for weaving history through music, dance, costume, and drama. His attention to detail showed in every aspect of every video.

Your favorite music-focused TV show and/or podcast.

The Voice for a music-focused TV show. I’m not much of a podcaster.

A recent project you are proud of.

The pandemic has upended the music education programs in our schools. Many students, especially those from historically marginalized communities, were unable to participate in their school music programs simply because they could not afford the music-specific PPE that was needed. to play. And music is often the only reason some of these kids go to school every day. I’m extremely proud that Give A Note established the Let’s Play Music Fund during this time, providing over 13,000 specialized PPE, helping over 7,000 students from 86 schools in 18 states get back into the music classroom to play. Our mission is deeply rooted in creating equitable access and participation in music education, and while this was outside of our normal grant funding programs, it was exactly what teachers and the students needed – a way to bring the group together!

Someone else’s project you admired recently.

Last November, the Fisk Jubilee Singers celebrated their 150th anniversary with a benefit concert at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. One of Give A Note’s board members, Eric Holt, was on the organizing committee that produced the show. It was a remarkable tribute to the history of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, their contribution to music and to the city of Nashville and raised more than $1.5 million to secure an endowment for the sustainability of the organization. It was an impressive show of talent, history and philanthropy, all rolled into one incredible package!

How musicians should approach working with brands.

Musicians have a unique opportunity when working with a brand to change and expand the audience of for-profit and non-profit brands. The impact affects both the musician and the brand – and hopefully in a positive way. They need to have the endgame in sight when deciding if/when they want to line up on that mark.

How brands should approach working with musicians.

It’s the same idea in terms of knowing the endgame in advance. Brands should apply when they have a clear strategy on how much impact they want the musician to have on their brand, and know what benefits it will also create for the musician.

What music can do that nothing else can.

Music always makes us feel something, and often in a deeply profound way.

What you would be doing if you weren’t in the music business.

Marketing and advertising. I like the idea of ​​collaborating with others to create something that could change the way people think.

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Bienen School of Music Music Education Program https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 06:36:28 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/bienen-school-of-music-music-education-program/ Podcast (nu-declassified): Listen in a new window | To download Subscribe: Spotify | Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music […]]]>

Whether a student is in primary or secondary school, music teachers can transform children’s lives. This episode of NU Declassified takes a look at what the Bienen School of Music’s music education major is and the opportunities it presents for future music teachers.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

FELIX GARKISCH: People have this stereotype of a music major. It’s like, “Oh, they don’t have to do much. All they have to do is practice their instrument or they don’t have to do any real work,” which I think is right — totally, completely wrong.

ERICA SCHMITT: It was Felix Garkisch, a freshman in the music education program at the Bienen School of Music. Félix’s main instrument is the violin.

[music, Violin Concerto Vo. 2 in d minor by Henryk Wieniawski, performed by by Felix Garkisch on violin]

ERICA SCHMITT: While some Bienen students plan to play their instrument professionally, others, like Felix, strive to become teachers themselves.

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. This is NU Declassified, a look at how the Wildcats thrive and survive in Northwestern. I don’t know much about Bienen, but I always thought music was a really cool field to study at university. So, in this episode, I spoke to students and faculty in the music education program about the unique opportunities and challenges of the major. Felix said the music education major is slightly different from other Bienen majors.

FELIX GARKISCH: We have a lot of courses that we have to take by the time we graduate not only for our teaching students but also to get our teaching license. So it’s like all the other music majors. I would say that our courses are more academic, in general. There are certainly other practical or performance-based courses, like the various methods courses that I have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha Hussain is a freshman pursuing a dual degree in Music Education and Chemistry. One of the first classes she took in the music education program was Music Education 260-0, or Introduction to Music Education.

RISHA HUSSAIN: We will visit many middle schools, high schools and elementary schools in Chicago, and observe the teachers and their different styles. Teachers who are more active, teachers who let the children take the lead more, and we write a lot of observational reports and we discuss in class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha said she learned a lot about different teaching styles in her class.

RISHA HUSSAIN: In terms of teaching, we talk a lot about the types of teachers there are, so we’ll be playing with teachers who let the students do whatever they want. We call it a musical playground. So you don’t leave anything forbidden, like you sit on the floor with your children, if they are sitting on a carpet instead of standing on top of them. As body language is something we talked about a lot.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he liked the small classes in the music education program.

FELIX GARKISCH: Most of my teachers are really, really, really approachable. And that also means that even during class, they can see what your progress looks like, so even if you’re late or something, they can really, really, really easily help you out.

ERICA SCHMITT: For Risha, the program’s small size creates a sense of community and cohesiveness.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I feel like my teachers actually know me, which I guess feels a bit more like high school, at least for the standard high school experience where you have these consistent teachers. Like, if I take theory for two years, and it’s like I have this little tight-knit group of people because you usually take the same amount of time. And it’s as if you were part of the same group. And so you get to make a friend, and you feel comfortable around everyone. And then you don’t feel weird asking questions and stuff like that. It’s really nice to sit in there.

ERICA SCHMITT: In these classes, students must learn many different instruments as well as vocal and musical composition in order to prepare for the teaching environment. But on top of that, students also specialize in a specific instrument – ​​or voice.

RISHA HUSSAIN: So we have to take classes like percussion and strings and woodwinds to get used to the music that might be taught in an elementary school. And then you come into your concentration later.

ERICA SCHMITT: The music education program also offers three different paths for students to choose from: General Music Education, Instrumental Music Education, and Choral Music Education. Felix said the general track prepares students to –

FELIX GARKISCH: Entering an elementary or middle school class (and) teaching a music class.

ERICA SCHMITT: Félix pursues the instrumental music track.

FELIX GARKISH: This usually involves a band or orchestra, but it can extend to other things as well. Like, I know, some music teachers who run guitar lessons or also like music production lessons. So it’s not like the traditional stuff. There are so many things, it’s so open. And it’s really like, I can shape it however I want, which I think is really cool.

ERICA SCHMITT: Risha is on the choir track.

RISHA HUSSAIN: The person who had the most impact on me was my choirmaster. And just kind of watching her watch all these kids grow up and teach and use music as a vehicle to not only talk about you know, music is pretty, but it can be a vehicle to inform a wider audience about things like social justice, and it can bring awareness to many things.

ERICA SCHMITT: Like Risha, Felix said he –

FELIX GARKISCH: Really, really admired my high school music teacher. And the experience I had in that class made me think, “Okay, I want to be able to give this to my own students one day.” So music education seems like the right choice for me.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: All music education majors must participate in a student teaching program, where they often work with certified Northwestern teachers. Each student works with two mentors during their teaching. To find out more about this, I spoke with Professor Stevi Marks, the student-teacher and assessment coordinator at Bienen.

STEVI BRANDS: So, to get a license in the state of Illinois, you must have completed all levels of prerequisite training. So that means let’s say, Erica, you came to me and said, “Man, I’m really interested, I want a high school experience.” But I love elementary kids, I’d like to be, you know, run an elementary program where I first introduce the kids to the instruments and then maybe rehearse them in middle school and then have an experience in high school. So I would be looking for something like that.

ERICA SCHMITT: Teacher mentors guide education majors through the teaching process in a hands-on environment. Marks said she matches students with mentors based on a variety of factors, asking questions like –

STEVI BRANDS: Who can we match you with that will work well for you? And do you have a car or do you rely on public transport? What kind of experiences do you want? Do you want a marching band? Do you want a mariachi? Do you want to work with a show choir or do you want to help direct the musical? We try to match our students with a position that will benefit them and really, really take them to another level as a teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Felix said he had a student teacher for his high school music program.

FELIX GARKISCH: I remember she was a music education student in the North West and she was a phenomenal teacher.

ERICA SCHMITT: Although the music education program is full of opportunities, it can be a heavy workload. For some dual degree students, the program can last five years.

RISHA HUSSAIN: I think mine is a bit heavier, because I have a four-year plan instead of a five-year plan but I’m, I was at 5.8 units right now. And the rest of my plan is around 6.3 to 6.8 units per quarter. And most of it is Bienen.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said the program has made some changes to its curriculum over the past few years to ease the workload for students.

STEVI BRANDS: We know that music education students have to take more credits than I think almost anyone across the University. So we were looking for ways to consolidate some of these courses. And so I incorporated some of the technical things about singing into my choral methods course, which all students have to take.

ERICA SCHMITT: I asked Félix about his experience with the workload in music education classes.

FELIX GARKISCH: I mean, I love them. But they are designed to be difficult. And I appreciate that. It’s not like you can browse them all, you have to put in the effort to get a quality product out of it.

ERICA SCHMITT: Marks said that ultimately her goal is to motivate students to remain passionate about teaching students as she always has been.

STEVI BRANDS: Music education offers every child the opportunity to express themselves in a way that they will not find in any other discipline. And so that’s the most valid pursuit. And we need great music teachers and I’m proud to serve in that capacity. It scares me, Erica, it’s a big responsibility. These fabulous young adults are going to come out and they’re going to have their own classroom. And God willing, they’re going to make a difference like someone did in their life, a positive difference. And that’s what I think about every time I go to class.

[music]

ERICA SCHMITT: From the Daily Northwestern, I’m Erica Schmitt. Thanks for listening to another episode of NU: Declassified. This episode was reported and produced by me. The Daily Northwestern’s Audio Editor is Will Clark, Digital Editor is Jordan Mangi, and Managing Editor is Isabelle Sarraf. Be sure to subscribe to The Daily Northwestern podcast on Spotify, Apple Podcasts or SoundCloud to hear more episodes like this.

[music]

E-mail: [email protected]
Twitter: @eschmitt318

Related stories:
– Captured: Bienen’s fall concert series marks the return to in-person performances
— In Focus: Diversifying classical music through education
— NU Declassified: A Day at the Opera

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Santa Maria-Bonita Receives $3.6 Million Gift for Music Education in the Form of Apple Stock | Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-maria-bonita-receives-3-6-million-gift-for-music-education-in-the-form-of-apple-stock-education/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 03:30:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-maria-bonita-receives-3-6-million-gift-for-music-education-in-the-form-of-apple-stock-education/ The Santa Maria-Bonita School District will be able to increase local K-8 students’ access to musical instruments with an unprecedented donation of nearly $3.6 million given in memory of the local music lover Elizabeth Anne Brooks. The funds were provided by the Brooks Family Trust in the form of 20,818 shares of Apple – each […]]]>

The Santa Maria-Bonita School District will be able to increase local K-8 students’ access to musical instruments with an unprecedented donation of nearly $3.6 million given in memory of the local music lover Elizabeth Anne Brooks.

The funds were provided by the Brooks Family Trust in the form of 20,818 shares of Apple – each valued at $172.79 as of Tuesday – and formally accepted by the district board of directors at their meeting on 9 February.

The Brooks family has requested that the funds be used exclusively for the purpose of encouraging children to learn to play a musical instrument and continue long enough to become proficient, by making instruments available for rental to any student from Santa Maria enrolled in a public school music class. .

Acting Superintendent Matthew Beecher said the district will cash in the shares as soon as they have access to deposit them into the new Elizabeth A. Brooks Music Fund.

“We’re very excited about this and what it means in the long term for our children and their access to instrumental music,” Beecher told the district council.

Brooks, who died in 2012 at the age of 44, was known for her love of the flute as well as other instruments like the piano. She performed in the Junior National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, DC, and studied flute at Stony Brook State University in New York and the Suzuki Institute of Music in Japan.

Upon arriving in Santa Maria in 2004, she became a member of the Allan Hancock College Concert Band and the Christ United Methodist Church Choir, and was also known to have attended the Battle of the Bands competition at Ethel Auditorium. Pope of Santa Maria High School.

“It was his enjoyment of these performances that led his parents, Martha and Norman Brooks, to honor his memory by directing these resources to support the instrumental music program in the Santa Maria-Bonita School District,” Beecher said.

Board members marveled at the size of the donation for a public school district like theirs.

“This is probably the most gracious and grandest gift I’ve seen of this nature in a public setting like ours – we’re not a university, we don’t have deep-pocketed alumni or anything like that, so the generosity is just amazing,” said board member John Hollinshead.

Upon access to the shares, the district will immediately open an investment account with Fidelity Investments to execute the sale. Proceeds from the sale will then be placed in the Elizabeth A. Brooks Music Fund under the direction of the Santa Barbara County Treasurer.

Funds can also be used to provide access to musical instruments for students around Santa Maria, such as Orcutt.

Board member Ricardo Valencia noted that improving access to musical instruments for elementary students will also greatly benefit the Santa Maria Joint Union School District, where there is already a strong music program. with talented students.

“Now imagine what the possibilities will be for our young people when they get these resources at an even earlier stage in their lives. I get chills just thinking about it” Valencia said.

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Santa Barbara Education Foundation, 99.9 KTYD Instrumental in Local Music Education | School zone https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 18:05:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/santa-barbara-education-foundation-99-9-ktyd-instrumental-in-local-music-education-school-zone/ Posted on February 1, 2022 | 10:05 a.m. Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments. The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a […]]]>

Posted on February 1, 2022
| 10:05 a.m.

Since 2003, the Santa Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) has kept school music programs going by raising funds to pay for instruction and collecting instruments.

The efforts allowed every elementary student in Santa Barbara Unified to learn to play an instrument as part of their school curriculum, a rarity for California school districts.

In recent years, SBEF staff and local music education advocates have taken to the airwaves on 99.9 KTYD to ask for community support.

During last year’s Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, SBEF provided $30,000 in funding and 60 donated instruments, including Indian string instruments, accordions, cellos and a piccolo that will go straight into the hands students in SB Unified music programs.

With so much hanging around the annual event, SBEF will once again join 99.9 KTYD for the entire month of February for the Keep the Beat Instrument Drive. The on-air event will serve as an outreach and celebration for SB Unified student musicians.

“We are always amazed at how our community comes together to support students with the gift of music,” said SBEF Executive Director Margie Yahyavi. “This is a huge victory for our students.

“In addition to the problem-solving and cooperative learning skills gained from playing music, having a creative outlet can be a huge benefit for a child, especially during this difficult time,”

The month-long radio event will feature SB Unified music teachers and local professional musicians taking to the airwaves to rally community support for music education at local public schools.

This year’s guests include George Pendergast of Dishwalla, Dylan Aguilera, music and band director of Santa Barbara High School, and Rick Boller of the Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation.

SBEF will also host a contactless instrument donation site from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Friday in February at its offices, 1330 State St. Instrument donations are also accepted at Nick Rail Music at 2801 De La Vina Street.

Do you have an instrument that collects dust? Donate your used instruments to put them directly into the hands of a student through a local school music program.

For more information about Keep the Beat Instrument Drive, visit keepthebeatsb.org or call 805-284-9125.

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Shillong Chamber Choir founder and music composer Neil Nongkynrih dies in Mumbai https://russjohnsonmusic.com/shillong-chamber-choir-founder-and-music-composer-neil-nongkynrih-dies-in-mumbai/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 15:48:27 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/shillong-chamber-choir-founder-and-music-composer-neil-nongkynrih-dies-in-mumbai/ [ad_1] Shillong Chamber Choir founder and music composer Neil Nongkynrih died in Mumbai on Wednesday following a brief illness, choir officials said. The 52-year-old conductor and composer who brought CSC to national fame after a reality TV show a decade ago has died at Reliance Hospital in Mumbai after a brief illness, have they declared. […]]]>


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Shillong Chamber Choir founder and music composer Neil Nongkynrih died in Mumbai on Wednesday following a brief illness, choir officials said.

The 52-year-old conductor and composer who brought CSC to national fame after a reality TV show a decade ago has died at Reliance Hospital in Mumbai after a brief illness, have they declared.

Neil and the whole choir had been in Mumbai for the past three months for work. “He was admitted to the hospital yesterday and died the evening of today after an operation,” a spokesperson for the group told PTI.

He said the remains of Neil, who received the Padma Shri, in 2015 will be returned to his home here as soon as all formalities in Mumbai are completed.

A former student of the prestigious Trinity College of Music in London and the Guildhall School of Music, Neil returned in 2001 after years of playing and teaching music in England, to found the Shillong Chamber Choir.

In 2009, the Shillong Chamber Choir collaborated with the famous Vienna Orchestra for a series of concerts.

The following year, the choir also won gold medals at the World Choir Games in Shaoxing, China in three categories – Music Sacra, Gospel and Popular.

However, India woke up to this talented choir and its founding mentor after winning the reality show “India’s Got Talent” in 2010. Initially, the choir was reluctant to participate in the show because it was about ‘a western classical music choir and the members were unsure. whether their music would go well in a mainstream show. However, as they say, the “rest is history”. The choir conducted by Neil has also collaborated with the world-renowned Fitz William Quartet. He has also partnered with big names in the world of Indian music including Ustad Zakir Hussain, Usha Uthup and Shankar Ehsan Loy. Their Christmas album in 2011 became the best-selling non-cinematic music album in India.

In 2010, the choir performed for former US President Barack Obama and then-First Lady Michelle Obama during their visit to India.

Notably, the SCC’s version of “Vande Maataram” was played on the live television broadcast of the Indian space rocket Chandrayaan – 2 landing on the moon.

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Posted on: Wednesday January 05, 2022 9:18 PM IST

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Savannah Music Stores Aim To Give Students A Quality Music Education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 12:25:55 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/savannah-music-stores-aim-to-give-students-a-quality-music-education/ [ad_1] Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat. It often starts with […]]]>


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Music education and playing an instrument has long been proven to contribute to children’s development by improving their language, memory, listening and coordination skills. In times like this when the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted lives, it can also help them reduce their anxiety and act as a sort of retreat.

It often starts with that decision in elementary school where students have the option of choosing an after-school program, such as a band or orchestra, which often continues through high school. In this journey it is common to see the relationship and collaboration between students, group programs and music stores that champion music education.

The legacy of Portman’s Music Superstore

Portman Music Superstore, a longtime Savannah staple, has an intimate relationship with group programs across the Southeast. Founded in 1936 by Ben Portman, Portman’s has been instrumental in the development of band and orchestral programs in the region. Jerry Portman, son of Ben Portman, currently owns the store and his wife Myra oversees the office. He said that prior to his and his father’s involvement in schools in the early 1950s, there were little or no band programs in the public school system and private schools in Savannah-Chatham County.

“My dad got a call from a few musical instrument companies that make instruments, and they said, ‘If we sent you horns in August, would you give them to the kids in the school marching band? beginner? And then whatever you don’t rent, send it back to us in October, and we can calculate the payment for the horns that have been rented. That’s how he officially got into the business, ”explained Jerry Portman. “He and I helped start music programs in schools that had never had music programs before. “

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

Portman’s has other locations in Albany, Augusta and Brunswick and rents instruments to thousands of students each year. They also offer full repairs and music lessons with 45 qualified instructors. They laid the groundwork for the group programs students participate in today and, at the forefront, they emphasize the importance of music education.

16-year-old Anne Ou takes piano lessons with instructor Hannah Wong at Portman's Music Superstore on Abercorn Street.

“We are proud to have done this for 85 years. We created it. We are still going strong. We are dedicated to music education. We are doing everything we can, ”said Myra Portman.

Guitar and Music & Arts Center

Students and parents alike looking for places to rent and purchase instruments don’t have to look far. On the same street as Portman’s, Abercorn is lined with two other stores that emphasize the importance of music education: Guitar Center and its subsidiary Music & Arts, the two retail chains, they claim, provide the largest selection of instruments in the United States.

The Music & Arts storefront located at 7805 Abercorn St., Suite 20A.

“Music education is what it all comes down to at the end of the day,” said Mike Marra, Retail District Manager for Music & Arts. “We can offer students the opportunity to explore a new art and give them a platform to express themselves. Music education has been proven to increase test scores and academic ability. For us to bring that into this community, that’s who we all are.

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Both stores also offer private and group musical instrument lessons with qualified instructors, rentals and repairs, contributing to the many choices available to students in acquiring a quality music education.

The Guitar Center showcase located at 7700 Abercorn St.

Guitar Center opened on the lot next to Portman’s in November 2021. Music & Arts opened across the street in April 2021; However, said Marra, prior to the physical establishment, Music & Arts had worked in partnership with directors of local bands and orchestras for more than six years, helping students choose the instruments that were best for them.

“A big part of educating and maintaining music is about getting kids interested. And we provide services that help these principals go into elementary schools and reach out and motivate these people to try and get started so that we can continue to bring music to life in schools, ”said Marra.

Music during the pandemic

Like many businesses, the pandemic has affected the operation of these music stores. Guitar Center and Music & Arts offer virtual lessons, and Portman’s installed an air purification system to make lessons safer for educators and students.

Rodney Gerido is a 52-year-old tank top who started taking guitar lessons with instructor Lee Cheek at Portman's Music Superstore in January 2021.

As the COVID-19 pandemic has changed operations, music education has persisted, from children to adults.

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Jerry Portman said when people started to come back, it wasn’t the kids who came through the doors first, but more adults.

Studies have shown that music helps people get through the pandemic, which is evident in trends such as increased sales of musical vinyls since 2020 and increased sales of guitars. According to a study by Fender YouGov, nearly 16 million people have taken back the guitar since the COVID-19 pandemic.

A wall of guitars at the Savannah Guitar Center.  Will Bryant, chief executive, said there was an increase in the number of people wanting to learn to play the guitar during the pandemic.

“There was certainly a great deal of interest in people looking to buy a new instrument, whether it was a seasoned musician who has been playing drums for years, who perhaps wanted to get into the guitar.” , said Will Bryant, Managing Director of Savannah Guitar. Center. “We’ve also had a lot of people who were just looking for a hobby to take their time while they’re stuck at home. And a lot of people kind of look to the guitar for that because so many people would come and say that they wanted to learn to play guitar for years and years and years. Now that they are kind of forced to take that free time, it has given them the opportunity to follow that passion. ”

Following:Gene Dobbs Bradford to lead Savannah Music Festival as first black executive director

The stores also make an effort to supply musical instruments to other organizations in Savannah. Friends of Ben Tucker Inc., the charity honoring jazz great Ben Tucker, partners with Portman’s to provide musical instruments to underprivileged children in the Savannah area, and Music & Arts has partnered with Savannah Jazz to sponsor the 2021 festival master classes.

For a city like Savannah that is teeming with music, music stores are providing the next generation with the tools to acquire a quality music education.

“It just means the music is always popular. The groups will be there forever. School music will be here forever, ”said Myra Portman.

Laura Nwogu is the Quality of Life reporter for Savannah Morning News. Contact her at lnwogu@gannett.com. Twitter: @lauranwogu_

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Many children “do not receive any musical education” https://russjohnsonmusic.com/many-children-do-not-receive-any-musical-education/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 15:33:46 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/many-children-do-not-receive-any-musical-education/ [ad_1] A survey found that a significant minority of primary school teachers say music is “non-existent” or “virtually non-existent” in their schools, reports Emma Seith. The research – carried out by the Royal Conservatory of Scotland (RCS) – also found that nearly one in ten teachers surveyed answered ‘never’ when asked how often children in […]]]>


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A survey found that a significant minority of primary school teachers say music is “non-existent” or “virtually non-existent” in their schools, reports Emma Seith.

The research – carried out by the Royal Conservatory of Scotland (RCS) – also found that nearly one in ten teachers surveyed answered ‘never’ when asked how often children in their class attended music lessons. , although the largest proportion (33 percent) said music lessons were taken weekly.

Meanwhile, only 3 percent of elementary teachers said their schools had a “structured and cohesive curriculum” in music education.

Respondents to the survey of 437 primary school teachers most often indicated that music education varied from class to class depending on the comfort level of each teacher (60%) and that music was predominantly covered by the preparation of assemblies and school performances (55%). .

Only 6 percent of those surveyed said music lessons involved children playing various instruments.

Dr Lio Moscardini, one of the report’s authors and Senior Lecturer in Learning and Teaching at RCS, said: ‘Probably what worried me most was that 15% of all respondents indicated that music education was either “non-existent” or “virtually non-existent” in their schools, with 9 percent of those surveyed in the study stating that children in their primary schools do not take any music lessons.

“That’s a lot of kids who don’t get any music education. Evidence from the data is that this was three times more likely to be the case in SIMD [Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation] 1 and 2 zones compared to rich zones. “

Almost all respondents – 98 percent – considered music education in elementary school to be important, but most (73 percent) said their initial teacher education had not prepared them to teach music, while more two-thirds stated that they had not participated in any professional learning activity related to music education.

About three-quarters of the staff surveyed (73 percent) felt that music should be taught by someone other than the regular teacher.

However, the report – released this month and titled Primary school music education in Scotland – stressed that “this proposal is problematic on a number of fronts”, not least because “the reality is that there are only 49 music specialists in primary schools in Scotland”. Dr Moscardini argued that “a more pragmatic solution is to focus on how best to help elementary teachers develop their ability to teach music”.

He added: “Teachers already have the pedagogical knowledge to do this, what many lack are content-specific knowledge. This could be developed through a more collaborative approach where music organizations are working to support teachers in their classroom practice in a way that connects with what teachers already know and do and that supports a more sustainable model. “

Ultimately, the report calls for a national campaign to raise the status of music in primary schools and for each primary to have a designated “music coordinator” from among the teaching staff who helps colleagues to teach “class music”.

It also calls for an audit of all professional learning opportunities throughout the career in primary music education.

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A game changer for music education https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 00:22:42 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/a-game-changer-for-music-education/ [ad_1] Reading time: 4 minutes The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional […]]]>


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Reading time: 4 minutes

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

Sydney Catholic Schools has launched a landmark new music education program that will not only help foster the careers of professional musicians, but will also lead to better academic performance and student well-being.

Through Amadeus’ Music Education Program, 33,000 students in Sydney’s 150 Catholic schools will benefit from a quality music education, including learning to play a musical instrument by early 2024.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said the program builds on the great tradition of music education in Catholic education, with benefits extending far beyond the curriculum. music itself.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus. “

“There is a strong correlation between excellent musical progress in schools and better academic performance in reading, writing, arithmetic and analytical skills. So this was a time when we could put it all together and create a huge opportunity for all the students in our system, ”he said.

The program offers students in-class music lessons, ensemble lessons and small group lessons and will be led by more than 80 classroom music teachers and 270 specialist music teachers.

Tutors bring with them professional experience of orchestras and ensembles across Australia and the world, with strong program support from the Sydney Youth Orchestra, Sydney Conservatory of Music and Opera Australia. .

Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre” width=”808″ height=”488″ srcset=”https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4.jpg 808w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-300×181.jpg 300w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-768×464.jpg 768w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-696×420.jpg 696w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-695×420.jpg 695w, https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Kenny-Music-261121-4-600×362.jpg 600w” sizes=”(max-width: 808px) 100vw, 808px”/>
Students of the Amadeus Music Education Program at St John Vianney Elementary School, Greenacre. Photo: St John Vianney Primary, Greenacre

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large,” said Opera Australia Artistic Director Lyndon Terracini.

“We need a solid musical education in schools, and I applaud the Catholic schools in Sydney for their commitment and investment in Amadeus.”

The program started with a successful pilot project involving 13 schools in the Auburn-Lakemba network.

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case, and even show up for the tutorials on time.

One of the schools involved, Holy Spirit College mixed secondary school in Lakemba, said it was already reaping the rewards.

Principal Phillip Scollard said this has helped to dramatically expand access to music education for students from all socio-economic backgrounds.

“With our 7 years, even though it’s been up for a year, we can see that it really helps them engage in their learning more effectively, including better focus. Music is not a cheap business and therefore a program like this is also a real social leveler, ”he said.

Grade 7 student Elyssia Deeb started playing the transverse flute and said she had benefited greatly from the Amadeus program.

“It also helped me improve my memory because I have to remember all the notes. It gives everyone the opportunity to play musical instruments that we might not have otherwise been able to access. It’s a wonderful program and we get constant support and guidance from our music teachers, ”she said.

His classmate John-Paul Sukkar also had a very positive experience learning to play the viola.

“The Amadeus program is visionary and of enormous value to the orchestral world at large. “

“It gave me more skills and personal responsibilities. I have to keep the instruments clean, loosen the bow before putting it back in the case and even show up for the tutorials on time, ”he said.

The Creative and Performing Arts Coordinator at Holy Spirit College Ms Emma Hughes said the Amadeus program is starting to unlock many previously untapped musical talents among students.

“They never had the experience of playing the flute or the cello or anything and some students never even knew these instruments existed,” she explained.

The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program.  Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools
The students of Holy Spirit College Lakemba were one of 150 Catholic schools in Sydney participating in the Amadeus Music Education Program. Photo: Natalie Roberts / Sydney Catholic Schools

“So it has been very exciting to unlock these abilities that you would never have known existed without this program.”

Head of St John Vianney Elementary School in Greenacre, Mr. Justin Coupland said classes in the program had moved online during the recent lockdown, but face-to-face tutoring would resume soon.

“COVID embarrassed a bit, which made face-to-face teaching quite difficult, but tutors continued to post online through Google Classroom,” he said.

“As our grade 3 students start and enter high school, we’ll see the music programs evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary school, but particularly in high schools…”

Thanks to the program, students in grades 3 to 8 will have access to 52,000 different instruments by 2024 and in-class music lessons will begin in kindergarten.

Sydney Catholic Schools executive director Tony Farley said it would have many long-term benefits.

“As we have our grade 3 students starting and entering high school, we will see the music curricula evolve in all of these schools, throughout elementary, but especially in high schools, we will have students who have benefited from four years of practice, working in ensembles and bands which will then enter our high schools with real confidence and will greatly contribute to the music programs of our schools, ”he added.

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Music composer, Zachary J. Friedland, of Richmond, turns 31 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-composer-zachary-j-friedland-of-richmond-turns-31/ https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-composer-zachary-j-friedland-of-richmond-turns-31/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://russjohnsonmusic.com/music-composer-zachary-j-friedland-of-richmond-turns-31/ [ad_1] Saturday 09 October 2021 Shalom Memorial Chapel Enlarge + Friedland, Zachary J., 31, of Richmond, died on Friday October 8, 2021 at his home, surrounded by his family. He was the beloved son of Kevin Friedland and Beth Dworetzky of Richmond, RI and cherished grandson of Florence Dworetzky of White Plains, NY. Born in […]]]>


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Saturday 09 October 2021

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Friedland, Zachary J., 31, of Richmond, died on Friday October 8, 2021 at his home, surrounded by his family.

He was the beloved son of Kevin Friedland and Beth Dworetzky of Richmond, RI and cherished grandson of Florence Dworetzky of White Plains, NY.

Born in Plymouth, MA, he had lived in Richmond for 16 years, previously living in Hadley, MA.

He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Rhode Island, received his MA from the Longy School of Music at Bard College, and his Doctorate in Musical Arts from Ohio State University. He was a life member of KKΨ, the honorary national fraternity of the marching band.

Zachary was a composer and wrote music for orchestra, wind ensembles, chamber music and vocal. He was civic and organized music consortia as fundraisers for organizations, like his joint Notes of Remembrance for Wind Band consortium project as part of the Alzheimer’s Association’s The Longest Day project to help fund a cure. and hope for a world without Alzheimer’s.

A strong advocate of new music and young emerging composers, Zachary founded the Rhode Island Recording Ensemble (RIRE), which he directed with fellow Rhode Island composer and band director Michael Konnerth.

Funeral and shiva services will be private.

In lieu of flowers, contributions to his memory can be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 245 Waterman St., # 306, Providence, RI 02906.


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